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Ignorance: A Case for Scepticism
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Ignorance: A Case for Scepticism

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  15 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
In these challenging pages, Unger argues for the extreme skeptical view that, not only can nothing ever be known, but no one can ever have any reason at all for anything. A consequence of this is that we cannot ever have any emotions about anything: no one can ever be happy or sad about anything. Finally, in this reduction to absurdity of virtually all our supposed thought ...more
Paperback, 336 pages
Published January 8th 1979 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published April 1st 1975)
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Jake Wojtowicz
Apr 03, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was a really enjoyable book. it was far less dry than I'd feared, and everything is well argued for - however I think it's false (the "inconsistencies" just don't ring as inconsistent to my ear) and the last chapter is befuddling (perhaps due to my aversion to metaphysics) and struck me as either obfuscation or confusion. There are some bits of gold in here though, such as the idea that if you don't know anything, you can't be angry at anything (as it would be apparently inconsistent to say ...more
Jordan
May 31, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: philosophy
outstanding. We know nothing!
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Peter Unger is Professor of Philosophy at New York University. He has written extensively in epistemology, ethics, metaphysics and the philosophy of mind. He has had fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation.
More about Peter K. Unger
“scepticism by means of classical arguments, the most effective means initially to promote arousal. And,” 1 likes
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