Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Daddy Shift: How Stay-at-Home Dads, Breadwinning Moms, and Shared Parenting Are Transforming the American Family” as Want to Read:
The Daddy Shift: How Stay-at-Home Dads, Breadwinning Moms, and Shared Parenting Are Transforming the American Family
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The Daddy Shift: How Stay-at-Home Dads, Breadwinning Moms, and Shared Parenting Are Transforming the American Family

by
3.58  ·  Rating details ·  66 ratings  ·  23 reviews
A revealing look at stay-at-home fatherhood-for men, their families, and for American society
 

It's a growing phenomenon among American families: fathers who cut back on paid work to focus on raising children. But what happens when dads stay home? What do stay-at-home fathers struggle with-and what do they rejoice in? How does taking up the mother's traditional role affect
...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published June 1st 2010 by Beacon Press (first published June 1st 2009)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The Daddy Shift, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Daddy Shift

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Angela
Apr 22, 2010 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sd-fem-bookclub
The Daddy Shift provides a glimpse into the lives of stay at home dads, both anecdotally and statistically. Through interviews with SAHDs of all backgrounds, Smith does a great job of bringing out the diversity of their situations and backgrounds; the trend towards male caretakers isn't just a coastal upper middle class white thing, we learn.

The book's main flaws are that Smith tends to see his own situation as the ideal - a mother staying home with babies for the first year after which a fathe
...more
Scott
Sep 26, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: anyone that's interested in our future
I really liked this book. I'm a 40 year old dad currently deferring to my military wife's career. Obviously I could connect with the personal anecdotes in the book, but what I also found fascinating was the social science research that helped dispel myths, and explain the currently unfolding phenomenon of the stay at home dad. Another interesting note - I was mildly surprised to learn that my own father's equitable role in housework and raising three kids in the 1970s was practically unheard of ...more
Zach Freeman
Dec 30, 2015 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
This book started out interesting and helpful but at some point it started feeling more like an essay the author was forced to write and less like a helpful set of information for someone wondering about being a stay-at-home dad.
Kevin Summers
Jun 20, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: adult
I needed five months to finish reading this book! For me, Smith's most interesting point is that an unstable economy leads to more fathers being primary caregivers for their children.

Sample quote: "For many people, male and female, the question of whether men can effectively take care of children and homes remains open. But, after thirty years of research and growing male participation at home, we are now beginning to understand that the answer is yes, they can."
David Wunderlich
Aug 23, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
I think it was a reasonably thorough look at the ways things have changed and are changing for fathers in the last few decades. I wish it was published more recently than 2009 because he Great Recession and the nationwide advent of legalized same-sex marriage that have happened in the meantime probably would’ve been able to provide more good information.
Veronica
Jun 24, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: reviewed
Jeremy Adam Smith does a good job at laying out the path society took to get to where more dads are staying home with more and more moms leave in the morning for the office in "The Daddy Shift".

A collision of feminist wins (job discrimination protections, Title IX) and a change in economics (male-dominated jobs outsourced overseas) has lead to a moment where it appears that working women are on the uptick and working men on a downward slide. This has lead to the rise of bread-winning women and t
...more
Kristen Northrup
Rather than tell you what the modern stay-at-home father does, this book tells you what society thinks about them. Although written by a blogger, there are all sorts of studies and statistics. I got the feeling halfway through that it was a textbook for one of those progressive new family studies courses. Interesting as ever to compare east and west coast behavior, like whether working mothers regularly question their husband's basic domestic competence -- in here, no; in similar books full of M ...more
Will
Jul 07, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Will by: Meg
I really enjoyed this book. I think the author does a good job of being inclusive without sounding so much like a hippie that he's going to alienate folks. It's easy to be disheartened by the studies that are frequently cited about how little men still contribute to child care and to household work, and how rare equally shared parenting is. While Smith doesn't gloss over this, not only does he discuss many of the cultural and social factors that may contribute to this (and may contribute to unde ...more
Deron
Dec 14, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Usually when I start something new, I'll read a heavy cross-section of books on the subject, but for whatever reason when I became a Stay At Home Dad the only related "Dad" book I read was AlternaDad...until I stumbled upon this at the library. It's very well done -- intelligent and articulate writing that explores the history of fathers in these United States and where fatherhood (specifically those who are the primary caregivers) is headed. I was slightly disappointed that the statistics and h ...more
Chris Aylott
Wired writer and mostly-at-home dad Smith profiles a stay-at-home dads, and explores the social and economic changes that are making them more common.

It's a thoughtful book, reassuring even to us dads who work outside the home, mostly because it makes it clear that all those other parents my age have no clue what we're doing either. (Turns out we're all making it up as we go along.)

I'm a little too attached to our current standard of living to make radical changes in how I work, but this does e
...more
Kathleen
I recently met the author of this book on his book tour for Rad Dad. When I came home and spoke with my husband about how the reading went, I said of this guy "he was just so...earnest." He seemed like the kind of guy who looks you in the eyes when he's talking with you and speaks in the kind of unguarded way that one only can do when one is willing to be a bit vulnerable and completely forsake being cool. I loved this about him when I met him, and his book was endearing for pretty much the same ...more
Mike
Feb 15, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
As with all book that are putting forward a point of view, I spent a lot of time thinking about the audience. To fathers not interested in being primary or co-primary care givers, this isn't going to change their minds. To fathers who want that role, this is going to read like a lot of common sense. I think this book is best for those fathers who didn't necessarily want that role, but find themselves thrust into it.
Simon
Aug 09, 2009 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
It was an interesting read about issues that Stay at Home Dads (SAHD) face and how things have changed over the years. Economics is a big issue that required SAHDs to stay at home. I find it odd that conservatives want a woman to stay at home, but want to keep wages down.
Jill
This just couldn't hold my attention. Interesting stuff, but it was due back at the library and I just didn't feel strongly enough about it to renew it. Maybe because I'm neither a dad nor married to one nor do I have kids... but someday maybe I'll come back to it.
Vilo
Dec 05, 2009 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is an interesting look on changing work and child care patterns written by a writer who was a stay-at-home dad. I am glad the communities I am most involved in encourage dads to be as involved with their children as possible because it benefits children, dads and moms.
Matt Jorgenson
Jul 14, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
What a great find - props to Em! I thought it was going to be a collection of amusing anecdotes but it actually intersperses real stories w/ the changes and expansion of gender roles over time and various demographics.
Kara
Mar 17, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
I read this for research on an article I'm writing on stay at home dads, but it's interesting for many other reasons as well. It's a great book on the value of dads in parenting and our changing family structures. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Elizabeth
Mar 17, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Thorough overview of how fathers' roles are evolving, with a good mixture of data and case studies. And I'm in the index!
Kit
Mar 05, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great book overall.

My only criticism is the idea that one parent stay home for one year with the child after birth is ideal. That's just enough time to become truly irrelevant in the workplace.
Olivia
Mar 18, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I read most of this in draft form. It's an excellent, informative book for all dads and moms. A game changer, to use a popular phrase.
Joe
Jan 14, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Everything I wanted from a glimpse into the lives of stay at home dads. Some interesting history, a few sappy anecdotal stories, and some really genuine writing. Great read!
Jesse Bacon
A book about me!
Ildi
Jul 19, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very interesting. Lots of historical perspective.
Jenae
rated it really liked it
Oct 28, 2018
Nd
rated it it was amazing
Mar 27, 2013
Shan Lackey
rated it really liked it
Oct 16, 2015
tjandbaby
rated it really liked it
Jan 16, 2011
Jocelyn Thomas
rated it liked it
Jul 21, 2012
Lisa Diemel
rated it it was ok
Jun 03, 2015
Emanuella
rated it it was amazing
Mar 23, 2018
« previous 1 3 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
Jeremy Adam Smith is the author of The Daddy Shift, forthcoming from Beacon Press in June 2009; co-editor of The Compassionate Instinct, forthcoming from W.W. Norton & Co. in January 2010; and co-editor of Are We Born Racist?, which Beacon Press will publish in Spring 2010.

He is senior editor of Greater Good magazine, published by the U.C. Berkeley Greater Good Science Center. “Greater Good m
...more