Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Noc” as Want to Read:
Noc
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Noc (The Night Trilogy #1)

4.3  ·  Rating details ·  713,876 Ratings  ·  22,188 Reviews
Jedna z najgłośniejszych książek o Holokauście, ciągle utrzymująca się szczytach zachodnich list bestsellerów. Wspomnienia pisarza, dziennikarza i działacza żydowskiego Elie Wesela, który jako 15 latek został z rodziną wywieziony w 1944 r. do Birkenau. Po selekcji na rampie i kwarantannie trafił do Auschwitz, potem do jednej z jego filii - Monowitz. W 1945 r. został ewakuo ...more
Paperback, 166 pages
Published 2007 by Wydawnictwo Literackie (first published 1958)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Noc, please sign up.

Popular Answered Questions

Sam Ben Avraham My grandmother's brother was Elie Wiesel's best friend. This book is not made up, to that I can attest to through this connection. In addition, Mr.…moreMy grandmother's brother was Elie Wiesel's best friend. This book is not made up, to that I can attest to through this connection. In addition, Mr. Wiesel is a professor at Boston University, lecturing in the Holocaust Studies department. As a respectable University, I do not think that BU would hire someone who has done what you are accusing Elie Wiesel of. And something to reflect on... Let's assume it is true. Doesn't someone who has gone through something as horrific as the Holocaust deserve the respect to have extensive research done before calling him a fraud? You mention believe the Auschwitz Museum. Are you referring to the Camp itself that is now a museum, or is there a museum about Auschwitz you know that maybe I am simply unaware of? You also claim that Elie Wiesel never shows his number. How do you know this? And could it possibly be that people respond to such horrific traumas as the Holocaust in different ways, and Mr. Wiesel finds it too difficult to show other people?
Another note that should be interesting to everyone who posted here: Elie Wiesel wrote night when he was in the hospital he refers to at the end of the story. But he originally writes it in Yiddish. What takes longer is for him to write it in English and to publish it at all. Immediately after WWII the world was in such a state of shock, people couldn't comprehend and understand a story like 'Night.' It took a lot of bravery to publish such a book. The picture Aetna refers to below can be seen in the Israeli Holocaust Memorial, Yad Veshem, and I believe in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial in Washington D.C. I'm sure it can also be found on the internet.
May I ask you 1 more question? What is it about this story that made you suspect it was unreal? And not simply unreal, but fraud? You did research after reading it, but what prompted this research? (less)
Analecta Books "Page 999 is a thing"? The synopsis states the book is 115 pages long?
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Sasha Alsberg
Jan 05, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
"Our lives no longer belong to us alone; they belong to all those who need us desperately." - Elie Wiesel
Kim
There is little that freaks me out more than the Holocaust. And I'm not belittling it at all with the phrase 'freaks me out.' Growing up in the 1970s and 80s, I felt sufficiently desensitized enough by television violence to be able to gauge how often I need to shake the jiffy pop and run to the bathroom before the program/violence resumes.

Elie Wiesel's Night brings me back to my senses, makes me hate the cold hearted bitch I've learned to be. And not by some overtly dramatic rendition of the ho
...more
Navessa


The author, who is actually in the above picture, said it best in the forward; “Only those who experienced Auschwitz know what it was.” I think we can all agree with that. But can we, the reader, even understand what happened there? Can modern men and women comprehend that cursed universe?

I’m not entirely sure.

I first read this in my eighth grade History class. I was 13. It changed my life. Before this book my world was sunshine and rainbows. My biggest concern was whether or not a boy named Ja
...more
Stephen
This book is a hard, righteous slap in the conscience to everyone of good will in the world and should stand as a stark reminder of both: (1) the almost unimaginable brutality that we, as a species, are capable of; and (2) that when it comes to preventing or stopping similar kinds of atrocities or punishing those that seek to perpetrate such crimes, WE ARE OUR BROTHERS' KEEPERS and must take responsibility for what occurs "on our watch."

This remarkable story is the powerful and deeply moving acc
...more
Chris Horsefield
Upon completion of this book, my mind is as numb as if I had experienced this suffering myself. So much pain and suffering are thrown at you from the pages that one cannot comprehend it all in the right perspective. One can only move forward as the victims in this book did. Step by step, page by page. Initially, numbness is the only way to deal with such anguish.
Otherwise one becomes quickly overwhelmed by the images that evoke questions that cannot be answered. And yet, I read this book from t
...more
Brina
Sep 30, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The first time I read Night by Eli Wiesel I was in an eighth grade religious school class. At that time it had recently become a law in my state to teach the Holocaust as part of the general curriculum, and, as a result, my classmates and I were the torchbearers to tell people to never forget and were inundated with quality Holocaust literature. Yet even though middle school students can comprehend Night, the subject matter at times is still way over their heads. The book itself although a prize ...more
Stephanie
I am at a loss for words - just moved beyond belief. I decided to re-read this book in 2016 - the year that Elie Wiesel passed away.

He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 where the Norwegian Nobel Committee called him a "messenger to mankind," stating that through his struggle to come to terms with "his own personal experience of total humiliation and of the utter contempt for humanity shown in Hitler's death camps", as well as his "practical work in the cause of peace", Wiesel had delive
...more
Candi
"I was the accuser, God the accused. My eyes had opened and I was alone, terribly alone in a world without God, without man. Without love or mercy."

These words and this book just tore at my heart. I have seen Night, have heard of Night for many years now. I waited to read it, unsure what I could possibly gain from reading another account of the evil existing among our fellow human beings – I will become enraged and depressed. I can’t change history. I will be forced to examine my own faith and I
...more
Martine
This book has garnered so many five-star reviews and deals with such important subject matter that it almost feels like an act of heresy to give it a mere four stars. Yet that is exactly what I'm going to do, for while Night is a chilling account of the Holocaust and the dehumanisation and brutalisation of the human spirit under extreme circumstances, the fact remains that I've read better ones. Better written ones, and more insightful ones, too.

Night is Elie Wiesel's somewhat fictionalised acco
...more
Kat
Dec 17, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: anyone with a soul
Shelves: eyeopening
I teach this book yearly, but my students seemed distant from the true reality of the story. When I use the Holocaust Museum's interactive of Lola Rein's dress, it hits them. Real people, real history. The immediacy of the tragedy that was Wiesel's then comes to life in a way that a junior or senior can grasp. I also tell the story of my friend, Ida, and her "no grandparents". That is the hardest part for me as it is so personal. She was the daughter of survivors - she had no grandparents and I ...more
Lindsay
Jan 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
5 stars......I am at a loss for words.......upon finishing this memoir, I am so full of intense emotion yet I feel empty at the same time......

This is a DEEPLY moving and powerful book about the author's experience in concentration camps and the atrocities that happened during the Holocaust. Words cannot describe how I truly feel about what I read on these pages. It is impossible for us, as readers, to truly fathom this piece of history, unless we lived it. I hope everyone takes the time to read
...more
Councillor


Night is perhaps one of the most remarkable, harrowing and haunting accounts of the events in the Nazi Germany concentration camps Auschwitz and Buchenwald. I read this powerful work only a few days before news of the author's, Elie Wiesel's, death were announced, and both shocked me. The first, because unless you have experienced it for yourself, you will never be able to realize the full extent of what happened in the Second World War with all its different facets and emotions, and the latter,
...more
Heidi The Hippie Reader
Night is Elie Wiesel's memoir about his experiences during the Holocaust. It is shocking and sad, but worth reading because of the power of Wiesel's witnessing one of humanity's darkest chapters and his confession on how it changed him.

In the new introduction to the ebook version I read, Wiesel talked about the difficulty he had putting words to his experience. "Convinced that this period in history would be judged one day, I knew that I must bear witness. I also knew that, while I had many thin
...more
Erika
Jan 16, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I’ve been meaning to read Night for years and finally picked it up shortly after hearing about Eli Wiesel’s death. Night is not a book that I can review. It defies critique, and even analyzing it from my sunny porch with a cup of coffee, feels wrong. Yet it’s the reasons that Night belongs outside of criticism that make it so important.

There is the Holocaust and then there is the world’s relationship with the Holocaust. By the end of the 60s that relationship encompassed adult children of survi
...more
Kristen
Jun 06, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
Shelves: 5-star
A poignant and unforgettable 5 star read.

“Human suffering anywhere concerns men and women everywhere.” ― Elie Wiesel, Night

It's been years since I've read this book, but as my son needed to read it for school, I decided to read it with him. I'm glad I did.

Night, which is one man's tragic yet remarkable survival of the Holocaust, is a powerful, shocking, heartbreaking, poignant, yet triumph-of-the-soul biography. This book speaks to humanity about the atrocities man is capable of committing. It
...more
Kelli
Sep 09, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: not-fiction
This is not a review. I am not worthy to review this book. This is my third time reading Night, having read it as a requirement in both high school and college. I picked it up at the library because it was upright on a shelf and I noticed it had a new preface by the author. I have read that preface four times so far. The PREFACE is that important, that thought-provoking. I am speechless. I am awestruck by the tremendous person that Elie Wiesel is. The story is a heartbreaking, terrifying account ...more
Steven  Godin
From the first few sentences, to the final closings words, I did not move. Elie Wiesel had my complete attention, and total respect, for the immense courage it must have taken to relive the horrors he went through in writing this book. Harrowing and chilling but told with great compassion, his struggle for survival during the holocaust is almost too unbearable to contemplate. But this has to be read, and everyone should do so, it makes all the mundane things in life seem far more important. Afte ...more
Vanessa
Jan 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Wow this book..can't express the feelings during my reading of this, so enthralling, captivating but oh the horrors! Unimaginable horrors. Tore my heart out into a million pieces. I regret not having read this earlier, this is a true account of Elie Wiesel as a young Jewish boy who has no foreseeable knowledge and understanding of what was around the corner when his family are forced to flee from their home in Romania, and the unknown horrors that awaited them. Even though I've read and have stu ...more
Sean Gray
Jan 12, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: eh
Recommended to Sean by: the michigan state board of education
Night, was possibly one of the worst books I've ever read. I was suprised when I logged on to find, Five star reviews of this book. Yeah, so it was written by a holocaust survivor. It doesn't make it well written. From a literary standpoing, purely. It was terrible. As Ms. Hawley would say, It lacked sentence variation. Maybe it was better when it was written in German? Maybe he should have let a "professional" writer, write it for him. I'm not bashing him, or his writing. Kind of. His writing n ...more
Tom Mathews
Mar 03, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone and everyone.
July 2, 2016: On hearing of the passing of Elie Wiesel, President Obama, who visited the site of the Buchenwald concentration camp with Wiesel in 2009, said "He raised his voice, not just against anti-Semitism, but against hatred, bigotry and intolerance in all its forms. He implored each of us, as nations and as human beings, to do the same, to see ourselves in each other and to make real that pledge of 'never again.' "
I first read this book about 40 years ago and it has stayed with me ever sin
...more
K.D. Absolutely
Aug 02, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to K.D. by: Oprah Book of the Month
If Anne Frank was 13 when Germans came to Netherlands, Elie Wiessel was 15 when the same thing happened in Romania. Two teenage children who saw the atrocities of the German armies who were blinded by their loyalty to Hitler. There were a few differences: Anne Frank died in the concentration camp while Elie Wiessel survived. Anne Frank's diary, first published as The Diary of a Young Girl in 1950, was written in young girl's language while she was on a hiding while Night by Elie Wiesel tells the ...more
Lyn
Dec 15, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Terrifying.

I have read two books that described a nightmare, painted a picture of hell. The second was Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy and first is Night.

I still think of this book sometimes and shudder and I realize that evil is never too far buried in us. The scene where the line of doomed prisoners splits in two with Mengela conducting, a perverse parody of the last judgment seems ripped from Dante.

description
Katie
Feb 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: holocaust
Difficult to review. Night is a brutal first-hand account of life in Auschwitz. We’re all very familiar with the visuals of the journey in the cattle truck, the arrival in Auschwitz, the squalor and deprivations of life in the barracks, the selections. Wiesel tells us with simple but supremely eloquent prose what effect these daily horrors had on the human soul. Tells us, in effect, how low we can go, how even a son can kill his own father for a morsel of bread if subjected to inhumane treatment ...more
Elyse
Nov 15, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I read this book once before
but read it again yesterday---with the new preface by his wife Marion Wiesel.

I did not plan on reading the whole thing--I just wanted to read the new Preface---but then while sitting around (with sick people in the house)--I just dived into the horror again.....(with expanded thoughts than in years pass).

Daniel
Jul 20, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I had put off reading this story for a variety of reasons, main among them that I knew what I would be facing, and was eager to find an excuse not to. After having been to the Dachau Concentration Camp in Germany, the images of the now-dead ovens still linger somewhere in the recesses of my mind, and to back to it, to read from someone who went through it, was not something I readily wanted to do. But I did; I gathered myself up and read through in a couple of days, the end of the book taking me ...more
Sidharth Vardhan
"Why did I write it? Did I write it so as not to go mad or, on the contrary, to go mad in order to understand the nature of madness, the immense, terri- fying madness that had erupted in history and in the conscience of mankind?"


The second Holocaust account I read this year is from an author who was a teenager when he was in camp, and who then turned first journalist and then writer. The other was 'Fateless' by another Nobel laureate Imre Kertész.

The less you know about before starting the boo
...more
Paquita Maria Sanchez
I had trouble discerning whether this book was actually incredibly well written, or just horrifyingly honest enough to shock you into awe. What I have pulled from it is less the prose, and more the images burned in my brain from the chilling facts that they express. Having read The Lost, I was at least somewhat prepared for the places Wiesel was to take me, and the terror contained within this short volume is actually minor compared to the extensive atrocities researched and transcribed by Mende ...more
Duane
In 1944, at the age of fifteen, Elie Wiesel, his parents and three sisters, were transported from Sighet to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. Upon arriving they were ordered, "men to the left, women to the right". Elie would never see his mother and younger sister Sarah again. What followed was two years of living hell, two years of "night".

What it was like in a concentration camp, what it was like for Elie and his father, can not be put into words that would be adequate to describe t
...more
Diane Barnes
Jul 11, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
What can I say about this book that hasn't been said better by Wiesel himself? Powerful and moving. My copy has his 1986 Nobel Acceptance Speech at the end, and there is so much there that applies to this moment in our history that it's eerie.
Mario
Dec 30, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed....Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust. Never shall I forget these things, even if I am condemned to live as long as God Himself. Never.


I picked up this book from the library just because it was short, and I wanted a short and easy read. I've never heard of it before, so I had no idea what I
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Elie Wiesel 1 3 Sep 14, 2017 10:11AM  
HMSA Summer Reading: Book Review: Night 1 4 Aug 22, 2017 10:22PM  
HMSA Summer Reading: Book Review: Night 1 1 Aug 21, 2017 08:24PM  
HMSA Summer Reading: Book Review: Night 2 7 Aug 21, 2017 05:09PM  
  • In My Hands: Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer
  • All But My Life: A Memoir
  • The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million
  • A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy
  • ...I never saw another butterfly...
  • This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen
  • Maus II: A Survivor's Tale: And Here My Troubles Began (Maus, #2)
  • Thanks to My Mother
  • Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland
  • Four Perfect Pebbles: A Holocaust Story
  • Surviving the Angel of Death: The Story of a Mengele Twin in Auschwitz
  • The Cage
  • The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness
  • The Invisible Wall: A Love Story That Broke Barriers
  • The Drowned and the Saved
  • The Good Old Days: The Holocaust as Seen by Its Perpetrators and Bystanders
  • Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland
  • I Have Lived a Thousand Years
1049
Eliezer Wiesel was a Romania-born American novelist, political activist, and Holocaust survivor of Hungarian Jewish descent. He was the author of over 40 books, the best known of which is Night, a memoir that describes his experiences during the Holocaust and his imprisonment in several concentration camps.

Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. The Norwegian Nobel Committee called him a
...more
More about Elie Wiesel...

Other Books in the Series

The Night Trilogy (3 books)
  • Dawn (The Night Trilogy #2)
  • Day (The Night Trilogy #3)

Share This Book

“Human suffering anywhere concerns men and women everywhere.” 2028 likes
“To forget the dead would be akin to killing them a second time.” 874 likes
More quotes…