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Drive (Drive #1)

3.47  ·  Rating details ·  6,126 Ratings  ·  704 Reviews
Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. Later still, of course, there'd be no doubt. But for now Driver is, as they say, in the moment. And the moment includes this blood lapping toward him, the pressure of dawn's lat ...more
ebook, 158 pages
Published May 27th 2010 by Poisoned Pen Press (first published September 1st 2005)
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Richard Derus
Sep 13, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Rating: 4* of five

The Publisher Says: “Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. Later still, of course, there'd be no doubt. But for now Driver is, as they say, in the moment. And the moment includes this blood lapping toward him, the pressure of dawn's late light at windows and door, traffic sounds from the interstate nearby, the sound of
...more
Lou
Driver did not want to know the details of the job he was on, all he did was drive.
He was on the streets in the beginning without a penny to his name then a fate encounter in a bar hooked him up with the stunt car driving world. You won't find this great story telling but a biography of one man's plight in the concrete jungle. He was not brought up with a silver spoon in his mouth but was street savvy and knew how to get by. He could out smart the players. As always the glamorous life of a stun
...more
James Thane
Mar 23, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: crime-fiction, noir
This is an excellent contemporary noir novel in which a character becomes caught up by circumstances largely beyond his control and must then struggle to somehow survive.

The main protagonist, Driver, is a stunt driver for the movies, and there's none better. But he also moonlights driving for robberies, and the thrill is principally in the driving itself rather than in the monetary rewards. He makes his position clear to anyone who wants to employ his services: "I drive. That's all I do. I don't
...more
Tfitoby
May 21, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: black-as-night
Did you see the movie yet? I saw it last year, expecting to be overwhelmed by a genius piece of film making; the hype was massive, the right people were saying the right things, Oscars were mentioned and instead what I got was a very good but not brilliant, subtle piece of noir film making.

Moving on to today and I have read the novel, complete with the face of Ryan Gosling on the cover, my first experience of James Sallis and a novel that has been called "a minor masterpiece by at least two sepa
...more
Ben Winch
May 07, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
What the f**k is this about? Why's the chronology all skewed? Does Driver give back the money or doesn't he? If he does, why?! And what's in the bag he leaves for his foster parents?!! If he doesn't, then why's he so pissed at Nino for not honouring the deal? Who set him up anyway? Why?! How?!! Maybe there are answers in here - maybe I just can't be bothered finding them. But my strong impression is that Sallis can't be bothered either, that to him it's all about style, and that some part of him ...more
Gabby
Long story short: I saw this book at the library and I wanted to read it. I saw the movie a few years ago and it's one of my favorite movies and I wasn't even aware that it was a book, and the book is only 150 pages with pretty big font so I was able to finish it in a little over an hour, but wow this was nothing like the movie. I mean it was, but it wasn't. I didn't like how it was written, it's so detached from the main character Driver, and maybe it's meant to be that way (I mean we don't eve ...more
Trekscribbler
There's an old adage amongst some of us online reviewers that kinda/sorta goes like this: if you have to resort to frequently using words like "perfect," "riveting," "startling," and "stunning," you're more than likely describing what the story isn't for the average person because the average person -- the casual reader, Joe Six Pack with a good in his hands -- tends to find these adjectives descriptive of very specific events in his life ... events like falling in love, throwing the game-winnin ...more
Adam
Apr 10, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: crime-fiction
The NY Times called James Sallis's Drive, "a perfect piece of noir fiction," but as usual they've got their heads up their asses, since Drive is a book that would be more accurately described as, "a perfect piece of shit." Sallis is actually a pretty good writer line-by-line and paragraph-by-paragraph, but he can't construct a book-length narrative to save his life. Drive jumps around in time, mostly to disguise the fact that its plot is stupid, its main character is less interesting than Of Mic ...more
Richard
*Re-Read in 2015 (originally read in May 2011)*

I've been on sort of a casual James Sallis binge lately, so I decided to squeeze in a re-read of the first book I read by him. I liked it a lot more this time, which might be due to the fact that I'm more familiar with his writing, or I'm in just a different mindset. In Drive, Sallis tries his hand at a hard-boiled, Parker-style heist story. And while being true to all the conventions of the genre, he still infuses it with his own trademark style: m
...more
Wendy,  Lady Evelyn Quince
When the best thing I can say about a book is that at the very least I can say I've read it, that’s sort of like saying, “Oh, chicken pox, I had that once! Root canal with Novocain wearing off, yup, I know the feeling. ! Hemorrhoids, and explosive diarrhea, I hear you!”—well, you get my drift…

Writer James Sallis's novella, “Drive” reads like something that would be assigned in a freshman English college course: a terrible, post-modern action tale with tons of characters, ever-changing POVs and a
...more
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Which is better: the book or the film? 7 47 Jul 19, 2015 04:32PM  
Some, ambiguous expressions in James Sallis' 'Drive' 2 39 Feb 27, 2012 03:23AM  
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91115
James Sallis (born 21 December 1944 in Helena, Arkansas) is an American crime writer, poet and musician, best known for his series of novels featuring the character Lew Griffin and set in New Orleans, and for his 2005 novel Drive, which was adapted into a 2011 film of the same name.
More about James Sallis...

Other Books in the Series

Drive (2 books)
  • Driven (Drive, #2)
“Maybe he should turn around. Go back and tell them that’s what life was, a long series of things that didn’t go down the way you thought they would.
Hell with it. Either they’d figure it out or they wouldn’t. Most people never did.”
18 likes
“He existed a step or two to one side of the common world, largely out of sight, a shadow, all but invisible. Whatever he owned, either he could hoist it on his back and lug it along or he could walk away from it. Anonymity was the thing he loved most about the city, being a part of it and apart from it at the same time.” 15 likes
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