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Soccernomics

3.91  ·  Rating details ·  12,305 Ratings  ·  555 Reviews
Just in time for the world's most anticipated and watched sporting event-the World Cup-two award-winning journalists reveal the secrets, mysteries, and oddities of the beautiful game
ebook, 336 pages
Published September 1st 2009 by Nation Books (first published 2009)
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Md. Amin Got to read few pages of it and I am certainly interested.
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Erich Franz Linner-Guzmann
As soccer being my favorite sport, I was really hoping to like this a lot more than I actually did; and it did have some really interesting parts to it. A big problem it had in fact was it took way to long to actually get to those good parts. If it had kept in my favorite sections and cut the length of the book in half, I would be giving this book 5 stars easily. I can't complain too bad though, because I did get some enjoyment out of it and I did get some really interesting facts as well.
Tfitoby
Jun 25, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, football
Fascinating use of statistics to disprove the prevailing social mindset on how football functions, a real easy and enjoyable read.

Quick answers for you:
Why doesn’t America dominate the sport internationally? Actually it's because they still don't care too much and haven't imported enough European knowledge.
Why England loses? They're actually better than they ought to be.
Why Australia is destined to become the kings of the world's most popular sport? That's a lie designed to sell copies of the b
...more
Daniel Solera
Soccernomics is a statistical study of the world’s most popular sport in the vein of Steven Levitt’s bestseller Freakonomics. Authors Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski delve into soccer by abandoning all conventional wisdom about the sport and studying it strictly by the numbers. Because of their data-heavy approach, the majority of the book focuses on European soccer, because it is from European sources that their findings are most reliable.

The book is framed around several questions: Which coun
...more
Sumit Singla
This book is the Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything of football. The book explores common questions in football and uses data to dispel many mythical notions.

Why don't England win more often? Who are the best fans? What is the best business model in club football? What is the link between medical facilities in a nation and its on-field success? Why aren't there more Champions League winners from the biggest capital cities across Europe?

Apart from answering the
...more
Mark
May 04, 2011 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kindle, sport, soccer
For a book that tries to equate MoneyBall to soccer it completely misses the point. It picks and chooses facts, wraps it in very basic stats to make it sound like they have done some work and maths and present there theories as fact which don't stand up to any scrutiny.

I have never been so relived that the last 10% of the book was acknowledgements and and index.

That said the passages about OL was interesting but the only thing I really took from it was under 23 is an ideal age to buy a player.
James Van
Interesting take on lots of stuff about soccer, and I learned a bunch of stuff, but I think some of the conclusions are flat-out wrong.

I think the authors tried to draw too many conclusions from a relatively small amount of knowledge of baseball and football. Many lessons have been learned since Moneyball (defense is valuable), and there's a lot more knowledge about football (running backs, not so much) than what was stated.

One chapter tried to argue that the NFL has no more parity than the EPL
...more
Cristian
Aug 23, 2009 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
As I salivate over the obscenely large television I might be purchasing just in time for this year's world cup, I was really hoping this book would give me an overview of the global soccer business. Instead, it was a disconnected series of not-that-interesting anecdotes, with lots of statistics, some of which weren't bad, but none that exciting. These guys could have used Michael Lewis as an editor -- he could have maybe spun the book into decent shape.
Alicia
Mar 13, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Marcelo and I got into a screaming fit last night over this book. I was trying to tell him some things that this book said and he didn't believe me. And so he started going off about how anyone can put ANYTHING in a book, and how you can't always believe what books say. (I think he was supposed to be talking about the Internet, but whatever). I think he was offended when I said that English Soccer owners run their clubs very unlike Americans. So the English almost never make money, but the Ameri ...more
Rob
Aug 01, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, sport, 2015
Being precisely one of the people who tends to scoff at the supposedly American use of the word 'soccer', preferring and even insisting on 'football', there's a chastening moment in this tome when the writers, who have been using the word enough by that stage to really be sticking in my craw, point out that in fact the decline in the use of the word essentially dates to the late 1970s, when the NASL was formed. That it's essentially a form of cultural snobbery: you use it, then we won't. Which I ...more
Indecisive79
Jan 10, 2016 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
As a recent (~last five years or so) fan of soccer beyond watching the US at the World Cup, and as someone who respects how insightful data analysis can help us see through what turns out to be weakly justified or even flatly erroneous received wisdom, this book should have been in my wheelhouse. And indeed, parts of it were. There are a lot of interesting points made here about a range of topics, like how, contra the complaints of supposedly beleaguered fans, England actually overperforms in in ...more
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soccer 1 19 Oct 28, 2013 07:35AM  
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“It seems that soccer tournaments create those relationships: people gathered together in pubs and living rooms, a whole country suddenly caring about the same event. A World Cup is the sort of common project that otherwise barely exists in modern societies.” 17 likes
“Whereas fanatic is usually a pejorative word, a Fan is someone who has roots somewhere.” 8 likes
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