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Alexander and the Wonderful, Marvelous, Excellent, Terrific Ninety Days: An Almost Completely Honest Account of What Happened to Our Family When Our Youngest Son, His Wife, and Their Baby, Their Toddler, and Their Five-Year-Old Came to Live with Us for...
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Alexander and the Wonderful, Marvelous, Excellent, Terrific Ninety Days: An Almost Completely Honest Account of What Happened to Our Family When Our Youngest Son, His Wife, and Their Baby, Their Toddler, and Their Five-Year-Old Came to Live with Us for...

3.46  ·  Rating details ·  349 Ratings  ·  90 Reviews
Judith Viorst's most adored book is undoubtedly the children's classic Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. In this new book, fans will recognize and be drawn to the Alexander they know and love—only now he's all grown up, with three kids of his own.

When Judith's son Alexander announces that he, his wife, Marla, their daughter, Olivia (age five), a
...more
Audiobook, 0 pages
Published November 6th 2007 by Tantor Media (first published 2007)
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Sarah
Aug 02, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
There are no new revelations here, no observations that have not been made by previous witty biographers. There are no disappointments either. This book was exactly what I expected it to be. As touted by its description and reviews, Alexander is a rather tongue-in-cheek light-hearted romp in which Viorst chronicles her 90 day "adventure" housing her grown son and his family. Because Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day is one of my all-time favorite children's books it tic ...more
Tom
Oct 24, 2009 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This is the author's account of what happened when her son, daughter-in-law and three grand children move in with her and husband for three months. I experienced the author's account of her family as disappointing to say the least. The author/grandmother seemed arrogant, snobbish, neurotic, controlling and self-centered. A neat freak who allows order and possessions to trump feelings for husband,children and grand-children. There is little to nothing said about her husband's involvement in paren ...more
Theresa
Sep 20, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was a short fun book. If you remember the children's books about Alexander (Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day and others), well this is Alexander all grown up and forced to move back to his childhood home with his wife and three young children while their home is being remodeled. His mother used his childhood as the model for many of her fictional books. She now relates the real life story of replacing quiet dinners using her flowered china plates and Mozart playin ...more
Linda
Jun 01, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: memoir
This was a sweet, light read. It was fun to catch up on the grown up Alexander, who has to be one of my favorite characters ever (immortalized by his mother in Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No-Good, Very Bad Day as well as one or two other books for kids). This is emphatically NOT for kids (a fair amount of swearing and adult musings on relationships that would bore kids to tears), but it is an interesting look at the ties that bind.
Laura
Jan 07, 2009 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction, read-2009
I enjoyed this book a lot - there were some real laugh-out-loud moments, and lots of things that most people can relate to. The one quibble I had was not with the story or the writing, but with the perspective of the author (and perhaps her family as well), namely that there is less (a lot less) value placed on a mom who does not also have a career. She seemed to suggest without actually saying it directly that the highest level of respect for mothers should (and does) go to those who "successfu ...more
Robin
May 22, 2010 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Just a fun, light-hearted look at what it's like for parents when their adult children move back in and bring a family with them. The author admits that she is controlling, but trying to do better. It shines some light on the difference in child rearing between the two generations. She also discusses how others she talked to dealt with it.

An overall enjoyable experience, but I can't say I really learned a whole lot. Just popcorn for the brain. But after what I've been reading lately, I needed so
...more
Kathy
This is what might be called a chapter book for adults: it's easy to read, consistently interesting and short! Judith Viorst describes how life changed when her son, Alexander, and his wife and three children moved in with them for three months. Among the descriptions of her own situation, are various examples of intergenerational family living from her friends and neighbors, some lovely, some horrible. Well worth the read, as Judith Viorst's books always are.
Sue
Sep 25, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I listened to this book as it was read by Laural Merlington. Despite (maybe because of) the fact that I don't have children, I could identify with Viorst's life changes as her adult child and his family come to live in her house for 90 days. This book is touched with light humor, but is primarily a reflection of multi-generation household living and family relationships.
Britt, Book Habitue
Aug 02, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: book-group
Reading this a mere 8 days after moving into our new house, having spent the last 6 months living with my parents.... Hilarious.
Andrea Greene
Dec 21, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Such a fun book! As a mom of adult and near adult children and a grandma, this book hit the spot of info and insight for this new phase of my life.
Tracy
Dec 28, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: memoir
I give this short (115 pages) memoir 4 stars primarily b/c it was enjoyable without trying to be more than it was. Fast read about the period of time when Judith Viorst's adult son moves back home for 90 days with a wife and three young kids (5, around 2 and one under 1). She talks of the challenges that she had to face (that parenting is different, her house was essentially trashed, but she didn't say that exactly and the lack of privacy). I'm interested in the fact that despite the fact that s ...more
Kim
Mar 27, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In 1972, Judith Viorst wrote Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day which she followed up with 35 years later with this lighthearted book about the now grown up Alexander returning home for 3 months with his family of 5 while their house was being renovated. What happens when two at home writers suddenly have their daily routine of quiet perfection, calm and order replaced by diapers, disorder and daily chaos? Like a wise woman, Judith develops a mantra of "Don't judge, advi ...more
Shellie
May 06, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I had no idea this was not a children's book and non-fiction until I had it in my hand at the library. The beginning was weak and I almost put it right away, but something kept me going and I'm glad because I ended up really liking it. Thurs out Judith Viorst has a really cute sense of of humor and the way she handles the invasion of the (as she puts it) The Alexander 5 is really fun. The Alexander 5 is Alexander his wife and three children who live there for 3 months while the home they're buil ...more
Victoria Lees
Aug 28, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Alexander and the Wonderful, Marvelous, Excellent, Terrific Ninety Days by Judith Viorst is a wonderful memoir about what it’s like for parents to take in their adult child’s family to their home for a period of time.

Once all the children finally leave the home, many times parents redecorate, enjoy peaceful meals together at a time they choose, even use pretty flowered dishware. Mothers can finally organize like they weren’t able to do when the family was all living under one roof. I mean, I’d
...more
Melissa
I did find this book amusing but didn't like the rough language used sometimes. Also, it seemed obviously exaggerated for the purpose of omitting things that you wouldn't exactly want to say against immediate family (or yourself, although I do think she was trying to be fair about her own negative feelings.) But I think it's a fairly accurate account of what might happen when children move back in with their parents and end up staying longer than expected. Neither party is necessarily going to b ...more
Sarah
May 31, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day has always been one of my favorites books of all time, so I admit that I picked this book up for the title alone. Luckily, I wasn't disappointed. Viorst's wry humor works just as well in her writing for adults, including in this short little (128 tiny pages) tale about the summer when her Alexander, all grown-up, married, and with three children of his own, moves back in with his parents, while his house is being remodeled.

Viorst doesn
...more
Chana
I liked this book about the ninety days that Judith Viorst's son Alexander, his wife and 3 young children move into the parental home while their own home is being remodeled. This Alexander is the famous Alexander from the book "Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day" but he has grown into quite a nice man since his no good day. His wife and kids are nice too. Judith (JuJu) and her husband Milton are really good grandparents in my opinion. As a grandmother of 3 I found mysel ...more
Marian
Mar 14, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: biographies
I expected hilarity, while not that funny, it was an amusing book. I think the true things that happen in families (at least ours)are funnier than most humorous fiction. Consequently, I had hoped for more from this little book of intergenerational experiences. Perhaps the author felt constrained to end everything with a positive note because it was about her family and her children's "perfect parenting skills" and the overall darlingness of her grandchildren while saving the self deprecating ton ...more
Ingrid
Jan 23, 2011 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I have to admit I'm on the fence about this book. The first few chapters of this short book come across as a long rant about why having her son and his family stay with her for 3 months proved to be an inconvenience, absolutely ruined her sense of order, and temporarily cured her OCD. I was beginning to wonder why I'd picked up the book in the first place. I don't want to hear about someone complaining about having family over, but she wrapped it up pleasantly enough with decent introspection an ...more
Sue Myers
Son of the author, Judith Viorst, moves into his mother's house with his wife and 3 children while renovations are being done on their house. Humorous account of the trials and joys of living with one's children and grandchildren. Judith is concerned about her velvet furniture, because meals are eaten in the kitchen but snacks may be eaten everywhere. This book was perfect timing for me for my role of grandmother in Sept.--what they do not use playpens anymore? how to unlock the safety locks on ...more
Vivian
May 01, 2015 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
Written by a grandparent for grandparents, it's the sort of book you pack around in your bag for those odd minutes you find yourself waiting -- in the car, at an appointment, for a timer beep.

The author shares the plans, process, and recovery of a family (which includes a son, daughter-in-law, baby, toddler, and six year old) sharing her home for three months.

I am very different from her so would not share many of her issues. However, I found some value in seeing a different approach than I wou
...more
Beth
Aug 29, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: grandparents
"Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible No-Good Very Bad Day" is one of my favorite childhood books of all time. I was extremely enthusiastic about the opportunity to catch up with Alexander in mid-life.

The book offered more of an opportunity to hear Viorst whine about how intolerable life was with three small children. Not to undersell the experience-no one doubts it was difficult. Children, even well behaved ones, are bound to be disruptive to a home of two senior citizens. Olivia, the single gr
...more
Kristen
Feb 05, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: moms and grandmas
Recommended to Kristen by: saw it in the book store, checked it out at the library
Any teachers/moms will know about "Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good, Very Bad Day" by Judith Viorst. All of her Alexander books were based on her own three sons. Now she's written a true account of the recent time when her grown son, his wife, and their three kids moved in for three months. This is a fun, quick read. It speaks a lot to generational differences (and similarities), about how to be flexible and get along, and about the things that are really important. I laughed a lot, a ...more
Joanne
Dec 17, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
By the author of one of my favorite children's books (Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day). A grown-up Alexander and his family come to live with Ms Viorst. It's a little funny and a little charming, but doesn't get very specific about the experience, just an overview of some of the bumps and joys. Might have been more engaging if written in diary format.

Viorst says Alexander and his wife had veto privileges on the book, so perhaps that made it a little more generic than
...more
Cindy
Apr 20, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Light reading about Alexander (of the Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No-good, Very Bad Day fame) and his lovely family. Due to some renovations in their current house, they move in with his parents. This is a look at the problems and challenges of combining two families for an extended time. There are negotiations and accommodations to be made. The author comes off as a bit whiny and controlling at first, but there are many wonderful trade-offs to living so closely.
Mary Kay
You remember Alexander & his terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad day, of course. Well, Alexander is now 39 & he, his wife, & their 3 children under the age of five, have come to live with the senior Viorsts for THREE months while their house is being remodeled. This is Judith Viorst at her mature best. I think you have to be a grandparent to fully appreciate the nuances here. I was shouting, "Right on!" a lot.
Amy
Jun 22, 2010 rated it really liked it
Fun commentary on modern parenting and intergenerational living. I wouldn't have liked it, though, before I had children. Short enough to keep my interest and make points. I found myself smiling, laughing, and agreeing with Viorst. I definitely want to read more by her.

Didn't give it 5 stars because of occasional profanity that limited the audience. The passages would have worked well without the f-bomb or Gd.
Ashley
Viorst, the author of Alexander's Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day recounts what happens when Alexander his family move in for 3 months while their house is remodeled.

While I'm sure her emotions were accurately portrayed, she complained an awful lot. I can't use my flowered dinner plates. I had to remove all my knick-knacks. No more fresh flowers. There were happy moments, too, but overall I wasn't a huge fan of this one despite my love for the original Alexander book.
Janille
If Judith Viorst's Alexander books tickle your funny bone (or remind you of anyone in your family) you will also enjoy this one. This is about the "real" Alexander, her son (all grown up), and his family. With children who apparently take after their father. But it was also surprisingly introspective, as a mother of adult children learns to live with her adult children and grandchildren. Some interesting parts in it.
Gphatty
A very short tale of a mom, her husband, and how they dealt with their son moving back into their house with his family of five. There are some good observations of generational differences, as well as some witty "kids say/do the darnest things" stories. I'd like to think that most grandmas/mothers-in-laws would be as smart as Viorst, but I know that's probably too much to hope for. The difficult ones could always read this book -- they could learn something.
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Judith Viorst is the author of several works of fiction and non-fiction for children as well as adults. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, her most famous children's book, was first published in 1972 and has since sold over two million copies. Ms. Viorst received a B.A. in History from Rutgers University, and she is also a graduate of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institu ...more
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