Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Angel of Darkness (Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, #2)” as Want to Read:
The Angel of Darkness (Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, #2)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The Angel of Darkness

(Dr. Laszlo Kreizler #2)

by
3.99  ·  Rating details ·  26,507 ratings  ·  1,509 reviews
In The Angel of Darkness, Caleb Carr brings back the vivid world of his bestselling The Alienist but with a twist: this story is told by the former street urchin Stevie Taggert, whose rough life has given him wisdom beyond his years. Thus New York City, and the groundbreaking alienist Dr. Kreizler himself, are seen anew.

It is June 1897. A year has passed since Dr. Laszlo
...more
Paperback, 752 pages
Published 1997 by Ballantine Books
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The Angel of Darkness, please sign up.
Popular Answered Questions
Lauralyn Padglick If there is I'd really love to see it written from Sara Howard's perspective!…moreIf there is I'd really love to see it written from Sara Howard's perspective!(less)
ephyjeva
This answer contains spoilers… (view spoiler)

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 3.99  · 
Rating details
 ·  26,507 ratings  ·  1,509 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of The Angel of Darkness (Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, #2)
Will Byrnes
Mar 02, 2017 rated it really liked it
description
Caleb Carr - from Lapham's Quarterly
If we succeed in bringing Libby Hatch to trial, it won't be just the outrage of the humble citizens in town like Ballston Spa that we'll have to deal with. No, no - all the mighty weight of this sparkling society will come crashing down on our heads, too. For it's the essence of hypocrisy, isn't it, Doctor, that it requires masks to hide behind? And the masks of the idyllic home and the sanctity of motherhood are the first and most untouchable of all.
Carr
...more
Adina
Jun 04, 2021 rated it liked it
The Angel of Darkness is the follow up to The Alienist, one of my favourite historical mysteries. This novel together with the first Shardlake introduced me to this genre that I now consider them among my favourites. As you can imagine, it is hard to reach the quality of its predecessor, a standard for me.

One of the elements that impressed me in The Alienist was the excellent sense of place the writer managed to capture in his novel. New York, 1890s. The sights, the beautiful and the filth, the
...more
Bobby Underwood
Oct 24, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
All those who read and loved Caleb Carr's "The Alienist" were ecstatic to once again take a carriage ride over the cobblestone streets of Old New York as a mystery is solved. This one involves the kidnapping of a woman's child which becomes a race against time when Dr. Lazlo Kreizler uses psychiatry to paint a portrait of a very dangerous woman.

Stevie tells the story this time rather than Moore, as our group of friends use Dr. Kreizler's revolutionary methods to solve this mystery. He is a pione
...more
Nick Borrelli
Mar 24, 2017 rated it liked it
Nowhere near as good as Carr's first effort - The Alienist. This just seemed like a bad clone of that book where Carr was trying to incorporate the same elements. Unfortunately the story wasn't as good and it felt forced. It has all the same characters that you loved in The Alienist but for some reason it just didn't make me swoon the way its predecessor did. Do yourself a favor and stop with The Alienist. This one was just unnecessary. ...more
Rachel
Sep 03, 2008 rated it it was ok
I remember thinking this book was incredible the first time around. Now, 6 years later, all I could think about was how ridiculous the narration was. You can't be all like, "I'm Stevie Taggert which means I'm all about turn of the century New York street patois even though my diction is actually really elevated and the only difference between my speaking style and that of John Moore, a Harvard-educated New York Times reporter from a high society family, is that I say "what" instead of "that" but ...more
Bettie
Description: In The Angel of Darkness, Caleb Carr brings back the vivid world of his bestselling The Alienist but with a twist: this story is told by the former street urchin Stevie Taggert, whose rough life has given him wisdom beyond his years. Thus New York City, and the groundbreaking alienist Dr. Kreizler himself, are seen anew.

It is June 1897. A year has passed since Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, a pioneer in forensic psychiatry, tracked down the brutal serial killer John Beecham with the help of a
...more
Laurie Anderson
May 11, 2018 rated it really liked it
With one glaring exception* this is an extremely enjoyable, well-researched, and well-written piece of historical fiction. I was a huge fan of Carr's The Alienist and now want to go back and reread it. Carr brings a wonderful combination of the story-teller's craft and the history-lover's attention to accuracy and detail to his work.

If you want to know more about The Angel of Darkness and Carr's earlier hist-fic (with many of the same characters) The Alienist, head over to http://17thstreet.net/
...more
Louize
Jul 12, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone
Shelves: favorites
It took me two years after I read The Alienist to pick up its sequel. It was a challenge that prompted me to read this gargantuan. But it was the challenge that gave me a chance to reacquaint myself with some of my favorite characters.

Unlike The Alienist, which was told in Charles Schuyler Moore’s point of view; The Angel of Darkness was told by the former street urchin, Stevie Taggert, ward of renowned alienist Dr. Laszlo Kreizler. It was narrated in a lighter, fresher and a more witty tone. In
...more
Allison
Jun 03, 2010 rated it did not like it
I've always had a personal law that requires I finish any book I start. Lately, I've been reconsidering. It all started when I tried to read The Devil Wears Prada and was forced to throw it out the window in horror and disgust after 25 pages. That's when I realized I needed to amend the law to specify that I don't have to finish books so poorly written that I end up holding them out away from myself with two fingers while cringing as if they reek of garbage while I read. This allowed me to leave ...more
Trisha
Not as good as the first one, but that doesn't make it any less enjoyable! This book takes you on a detailed exploration of a female serial killer's mind, delving deeper into her psyche to assess the reasons that converted an otherwise nurturing woman capable of love into the angel of darkness. The plot is sensational and thrilling, the writing is gripping and the criminal is more cunning and smarter than the one in the first book. A perfect mix for a good book!

The best part of the book is the r
...more
Lauren
Jul 03, 2008 rated it liked it
I really enjoyed The Alienist, the first book by Caleb Carr about Dr. Laszlo Kreizler and his "colleagues". When I finished that story, I was very curious for more details. Angel of Darkness picks up soon after the previous case, and the action begins almost immediately. This story is narrated by the teenage Stevie Taggert, the street kid that Dr. Kriezler has taken in, and saved from a life of crime. A Spanish diplomat's child is kidnapped in public, and the mother sees her daughter a few days ...more
Laura
Oct 25, 2011 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Bettie
Just arrived from USA trough BM.

Even if I haven't read the first book of this series, The Alienist, it didn't compromise this reading.

The plot starts with the kidnapping of a Spanish diplomat's baby but then the main story switched to the suspect of this crime, Libby Hatch, a nurse who is the suspect murderess of her own children.

Dr. Lazlo Kreizler, a psychologist or “the alienist” who tries to help the only surviving child to testimony against her own mother, leads the investigation team.

It sho
...more
Amy
Aug 03, 2007 rated it did not like it
Recommends it for: no one
This is one the worst books that I've actually read all the way through...though I'm not sure why I even bothered. The author's point is that if you really believe in women's equality, you have to believe that women are as capable of evil as men. I don't disagree, but I do have some problems with the way the author attempted to prove this idea, which I think he considers more controversial than it really is. First of all, the characters in the novel who espouse the author's view are preachy, pre ...more
Brad
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Amanda NEVER MANDY
The group is back to investigate another crime.

This book read the same as the first so all that charmed me before lost its luster.

The top two things I have to say:

Slow start and monotonous middle and end.

Predictable formula.

The endless amounts of side story that delayed the finish still haunts me. I had a chant going in my head as I read: get to the point, get to the point, get to the point. It didn’t help matters that I tried to watch the television series at the same time which was as dry
...more
Marnie


Fans of historical detectives and even the television show Criminal Minds will enjoy the sequel to The Alienist. The first 1/4 of this book started slow and had me worried that what I liked so much about the Alienist would not be present in this sequel. It took a bit for the story to build but then I thoroughly enjoyed the story.

Set in the 19th century when crime fighting techniques were at their infancy I enjoyed hearing the theories behind fingerprinting, ballistics and using sketches of poss
...more
Lynn
I liked this book better than I did The Alienist. I think mainly because there was less blood, guts, and gore. But also due to the subject matter. Carr is excellent at blending historical data with the story arc. And can he ever create suspense! This was more complex and relatable for me than the first book. Perhaps because I am female? There was much psychology, politics, and sociology in this second installment and I didn't get all that so much in the first book. I would definitely read anothe ...more
Kalyn
Apr 02, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Love these two books. This is the sequel to The Alienist and is a turn of the century (more or less) historical mystery, set in New York. That would be last century, by the way.
Lupinus Texensis
It had all of the flaws of the first, and none of the charm.

The Flaws:

1) Female characters killed off to advance a man's character development, no matter how gratuitous.
2) Said female character was a coke fiend who didn't notice her coke was laced with arsenic. Right after spending time with a notorious murderer. Really? REALLY? She didn't notice her own cocaine was, shall we say, OFF?
3) Only one female character with lines, who represents everything of the Strong Female Character.
4) Everyone e
...more
Amanda
Sep 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing
2018: I really enjoyed this sequel. It being told by Stevie originally worried me. I didn't want the narrative style to change. But I had nothing to worry about. I enjoyed the frame narrative of the novel and how the different pov made me reevaluate characters I was familiar with. I enjoyed this mystery, though I wish the focus had not narrowed so much in the second half of the book. If another book is published and narrated by George Guidall, I'll for sure be listening to it!

2019: I loved this
...more
Susy
Jan 04, 2018 rated it really liked it
3.5 stars
An exciting story which has you alternately sitting on the edge of your seat waiting for what is coming next and sitting back enjoying the descriptive (background) passages. Sometimes it did feel like Carr was dwelling too long on certain past incidents or backgrounds that, at least to me, were not that interesting, though not often. I really grew to like the main characters, felt a connection, even to the more secondary characters. All in all a very good read that made me curious about
...more
Josh Morgan
Apr 25, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: fiction
While the Alienist seem to be the classic of the two Dr. Kriezler books (it's ranked near the top of the 'best of' fictional crime book lists), I think Angel of Darkness was a far better book in both quality of writing and storytelling. While AOD is longer than the Alienist, the added length is justified with a more satisfying complicated plot and better character development. I just hope there will be at least a third book, taking place towards the end of Kriezler's career in some final epic ca ...more
Frank
Jul 14, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
Had to read this one before the show airs.
Another great period mystery by Carr, that picks up a year after the Alienist ends, bringing in most of the same characters, however with a new narrator.
The story here is every bit as gruesome, with a new set of plot turns and a trial, with none other than a young Clarence Darrow.
if you liked the Alienist grab this one.
Anthony
Dec 13, 2019 rated it it was amazing
If I don't declare this my favorite book of 2019, it's at least up there on my list. Wow, I thought this was really good. I'm still surprised that this had the negative reviews that it did, but maybe too many folks were comparing this too much with The Alienist? Or maybe because it was narrated by Stevie and so the language was a bit different? Who knows (who cares)? All I know, is that this hit all the right spots for me. A phenomenal detailed description of the time period --1897 New York, gre ...more
St Jerome
Mar 27, 2020 rated it really liked it
I really enjoyed ‘The Alienist’ but I have to say that ‘The Angel of Darkness’ is even a better read.
Carr’s writing is full of historic details that bring not only the characters but their time and environment so vividly to life I promise you will not forget this book.
A solid 41/2 stars....
Steven Belanger
May 21, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Almost as quick a read as its predecessor, this one is told from the point of view of Stevie, from his cigarette shop, as he looks back on his past. The cast is all here, and a few more characters show up, including one of the all-time bad women you'll ever read about--who unfortunately reminded me of a few people I used to know, but that's a review for another day.

NYC in the late 1890s is brought to vivid life again, but with a bit more of a bittersweet tinge to the tale, as Stevie also writes
...more
Ian
I did not enjoy this as much as Alienist #1, could have done without the unnecessary part about Lazlo being brought up on charges and ultimately declared innocent as it did nothing for the story and, perhaps showing my ignorance of all wars involving Americans, was it important to include the fact the kidnapped child was from Spain and "Lazlo and company" had to be careful not to upset political leaders from both countries.

Other than that, loved it. Great idea to have it told from the view point
...more
The Celtic Rebel (Richard)
~ Great World Building ~ Original ~ Page-Turner ~ Witty ~ Action-Packed ~ Tragic ~ Wonderful Characters ~ Unpredictable ~ Haunting ~ Tear-jerker ~ Informative ~ Entertaining ~ Twisted ~ Realistic ~

I have read the reviews of quite a few who did not like this and heavily compared it to the first book in the series, The Alienist. I will say up front I liked this book a little less than The Alienist but I still recognize how wonderful this book was. I liked the story and loved hearing it from the na
...more
Squire
Jan 07, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This sequel to the Alienist is as exciting and fast-paced as the orginal, though somewhat less accomplished in presentation. Nonetheless, it is an invigorating read.

This time around, the team that solved the Beecham murders is reunited for a kidnapping case that has potentially explosive international implications. The daughter of a Spanish diplomat is kidnapped in broad daylight with no ransom. During their investigations, Kreizler and company come face to face with a woman who just might be a
...more
QOH
Dec 24, 2015 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »

Readers also enjoyed

  • The Adventure of the Peerless Peer
  • Redcoats and Rebels: The American Revolution Through British Eyes
  • Blazing Star: The Life and Times of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester
  • The Nature of Monsters
  • Gone to Darkness (Sydney Rose Parnell, #4)
  • The Yard (Scotland Yard's Murder Squad, #1)
  • Vogue: The Covers
  • Make Russia Great Again
  • Creative Dreaming: Plan And Control Your Dreams To Develop Creativity Overcome Fears Solve Proble
  • Obake: Ghost Stories of Hawaii
  • Glen Grant's Chicken Skin Tales
  • Confessions of an Antinatalist
  • The Air Loom Gang: The Strange and True Story of James Tilly Matthews and His Visionary Madness
  • Passions and Tempers: A History of the Humours
  • Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America
  • The Devil's Workshop (Scotland Yard's Murder Squad, #3)
  • Memories of Underdevelopment
  • The Forbidden Experiment
See similar books…
See top shelves…
2,653 followers
Caleb Carr is an American novelist and military historian. The son of Lucien Carr, a former UPI editor and a key Beat generation figure, he was born in Manhattan and lived for much of his life on the Lower East Side. He attended Kenyon College and New York University, earning a B.A. in military and diplomatic history. He is a contributing editor of MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History an ...more

Other books in the series

Dr. Laszlo Kreizler (3 books)
  • The Alienist (Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, #1)
  • The Alienist at Armageddon (Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, #3)

Related Articles

If you ask us, it's always the perfect time to lose yourself in a page-turning mystery. To help you sleuth out a new read, we asked the...
169 likes · 101 comments
“She has that quality, does the Hudson, as I imagine all great rivers do: the deep, abiding sense that those activities what take place on shore among human beings are of the moment, passing, and aren't the stories by way of which the greater tale of this planet will, in the end, be told.” 22 likes
“It didn’t make any more sense to me then than it does now, how life can pile troubles up on a man what don’t deserve them, while letting some of the biggest jackasses and scoundrels alive waltz their way through long, untroubled existences.” 13 likes
More quotes…