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Resilience Factor

3.94  ·  Rating details ·  397 Ratings  ·  40 Reviews
Resilience is a crucial ingredient-perhaps "the" crucial ingredient-to a happy, healthy life. More than anything else, it's what determines how high we rise above what threatens to wear us down, from battling an illness, to bolstering a marriage, to carrying on after a national crisis. Everyone needs resilience, and now two expert psychologists share seven proven technique ...more
ebook, 224 pages
Published October 14th 2003 by Broadway Books (first published October 2002)
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Okta Ardiansyah
my name okta ardiansyah putra, iam from indonesia, now i'am college in university of muhammadiyah malang. this book is very importent to me couse, in this book i take the teory of recilience about aspect of recillience. i tried to looking for this book at many libraries but i cant fine it. please allow me to read this book. my parrent very hope i can finis my collage in november bucouse my dad retired on this month and he want to see me on the graduation day in that month. so please give me oppo ...more
Michelle
Jul 23, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very practical guide to the thinking traps that make us turn mountains into molehills and build walls between people who really, truly want to get along. I was frankly surprised by my results on the "resiliency quiz" in the beginning of the book, and knowing my own resiliency profile made the suggestions in the rest of the book much more relevant and real.

Shares a good deal of theory with "Learned Optimism" by Marty Seligman.
Glen Templeton
Could have been boiled down to a pamphlet. I skimmed the beginning, mostly because it didn't hold me interest. I am vet interested in the positive psychology movement, but I suggest you just read the practical applications section of this book.
Bridgett
May 17, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: psychology
A dry book in some ways, but filled with useful information. I was already familiar with the cognitive distortions, but it was nice to go over them again. I'm going to try to apply what I've learned here because I am not a very resilient person.
Meadow Johnson
This is a self-described self-help book, so I shouldn’t be critical of that format...

The information was great. I particularly liked the part about ‘iceberg beliefs.’ I’ve thought about those a lot over the past few weeks as I analyze my interactions and responses.

In general, I prefer books that talk about methods and the science behind them. But, this was a good resource nonetheless.
Sydney Major
Read this for class. Wasn’t my favorite.
Cindy Rahmawati
Jan 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
i do my thesis with this book
Harry Brake
Mar 08, 2015 rated it it was amazing
In for the long haul, I started this book back in March - so returned to it off and on for over 8 momths (testing the aspects of Resilience!) In the beginning, the aspects of methods and strategies to really,

I mean REALLY, outline the beliefs you have, then take a look to see if they are accurate, those that might be a little skewed, and be realistic enough to be applied to real life - it seems like "Who takes the time to do this?" YET

Doing so calms not only that urge to jump on a gut reaction
...more
A.E.
Jul 20, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
One of the key skills and traits often missing from people who suffer from depression and anxiety-related disorders is resilience. I didn't realize how adverse an effect it can have on a person to not have resilience, which ties in to not having enough self-esteem, self-confidence and a general sense of feeling good about oneself. People who lack resilience and are pessimists often don't do as well in school or at the workplace, have a negative outlook on life and can sometimes bring about self- ...more
Justin
May 17, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: psychology
How does one respond to adversity? The Resilience Factor brings a practical approach to how to better our lives by changing our self-destructive thinking and beliefs into a constructive response. Revich and Shatte discuss the basics of resilience, seven skills, and applying these skills to various domains of life.
The Resilience Quotient test measures your resilience across various aspects, and gives a sense of areas of strength and improvement. The seven skills provide the most practical steps a
...more
Shannon
This book is a bit dated, and much of the advice is geared toward people working in corporate environments that don't really even exist anymore. I generally don't find most self help books and worksheets and canned exercises to be helpful to me; however, I was able to glean a few pieces of advice and get some perspective that I didn't have before. If anything, it made me think more deeply about the concept of resilience and the core beliefs that resilient people share. So, I took from it what wa ...more
Erin
Sep 29, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: od, own
I'm cheating a little bit here--I haven't finished this book, but I'm decluttering my reading list. However, what I DID read of it was fantastic (I'm about halfway through) and really made me look at the people in my life, who's resilient, who's not and why that may be (and how I could improve my own resilience). Being resilient allows you to navigate the choppy waters more deftly and not immediately react to the stresses that happen in all our lives. I thought it was practical, easy to read and ...more
Shannon
Aug 04, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
The book started out really well. As it progressed though it became several pages of Cognitive Behavior Therapy exercises. It got a little clunky, same thing over and over again. I am sure that was the point so that people would USE the book, not just read the book. I just found it to be CBT re-written and I was looking for information specifically on resiliency not CBT. But the first few chapters on resiliency are excellent.
Alexander Belotserkovskiy
I have found that book as a book that is difficult to read. Actually i did not read it to the end. Authors do have extremely smart thoughts and big experience still book sometimes is boring.
However, if you have enough time to read that from time to time, it will be absolutely OK and i would recommend that as a good source of inspiration and resilience.
Jagadeesh
Sep 10, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: self-improvement
This book was tough to read but I persevered because the concepts are worth learning. The key takeaways are very much worth the effort it took to read: ABCs, thinking traps, icebergs, dimensions of cause, why/what-next beliefs. I wish the book had templates for the things they talk about that one could use.

Nonetheless, I recommend this book!
Elizabeth Olson
Why are some people more resilient than others? Why do some people bounce back from seemingly crushing tragedies while others are derailed by relatively minor travails? Is it set by our genes? Early experiences? Do we have any control over our own resilience? Can we develop the trait, build it like a muscle? These and more questions are engagingly explored.
Andrew Seng
Jan 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: psychology
It is a good read. There are a few parts where it is a little hard to get through, but the content is s solid base for understanding an applicable technique to help get through the hard parts in life.
Melissa
Oct 22, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great book, helped me begin to learn about a lot of thinking pitfalls I get stuck in. Not a treatise to practice positive thinking, instead, a set of practical tips for how to try and think more accurately. Exercises, graphs, and good stories.
Kenneth
The concepts are good. It seems that most of the methods described would work best with two people at least to start. It also feels like the ideas are stretched in some cases and shortened in other instances. The flow is not smooth.
Phyllida
Aug 09, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was a really practical guide to how you can make yourself more resilient. I did the exercises but only produce a few examples of each so as to finish reading it so I have a lot more work to do to get good at it.
Jim Maxwell
Nov 20, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a well written book providing the reader tools to use in daily life. Cognitive-behavioral psychology and positive psychology have plenty of evidence in the literature and this book makes tools from these disciplines available to everyone.
Lucille Zimmerman
Mar 11, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Important information but it was hard to get to it. The gold nuggest were buried in academic detail. I wish it had been edited for major points and a few examples.

I'd recommend but it's burdensome. Obvioulsy these authors know what they are talking about.
Farrell
Oct 09, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Really good stuff! Recommended reading. Was having a rough week and didn't feel too resilient myself, but will go back and re-read and actually actively DO some of the exercises suggested, instead of just reading about them.
Annamir
Apr 09, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another one I wish I'd read earlier -- like when I was trying to get ESTABLISHED IN THE BIG BAD REAL WORLD. Written in laymens terms, digestible chapters. I'd read the first two, then decide what you need to work on.
Swati Sharma
Dec 09, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book needs constant work. Inspired me to work on myself to become more resilient.
Jennifer
Aug 25, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good advice for the kid that never gets a b and worries more about the grade than the learning
Amalia
Apr 03, 2014 marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
good
Paul Stonge
Jul 10, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
life changing book ,use to see obstacles now i see solutions
Louise Ennesser
Jan 08, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Took a training course on resilience, after two weeks it was clear that Karen not only knows her stuff she lives it.
Chris Vega
Mar 04, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good book overall with a number of self-assessments. Not a traditional "self-help" book, really insightful and looking towards what makes you more capable of bouncing back when life happens.
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“The worst possible way to build someone’s self-efficacy is to pump them up with you-can-do-it platitudes. At best, putative self-esteem–enhancing slogans and motivational talks do nothing. At worst, they actually further undermine resilience and effective coping. Why? Because self-esteem is the by-product of doing well in life—meeting challenges, solving problems, struggling and not giving up. You will feel good about yourself when you do well in the world. That is healthy self-esteem. Many people and many programs, however, try to bolster self-esteem directly by encouraging us to chant cheery phrases, to praise ourselves strongly and often, and to believe that we can do anything we set our mind to. The fatal flaw with this approach is that it is simply not true. We cannot do anything we want to in life, regardless of the number of times we tell ourselves how special and wonderful we are and regardless of how determined we are to make it” 2 likes
“The worst possible way to build someone’s self-efficacy is to pump them up with you-can-do-it platitudes. At best, putative self-esteem–enhancing slogans and motivational talks do nothing. At worst, they actually further undermine resilience and effective coping. Why? Because self-esteem is the by-product of doing well in life—meeting challenges, solving problems, struggling and not giving up. You will feel good about yourself when you do well in the world. That is healthy self-esteem. Many people and many programs, however, try to bolster self-esteem directly by encouraging us to chant cheery phrases, to praise ourselves strongly and often, and to believe that we can do anything we set our mind to. The fatal flaw with this approach is that it is simply not true.” 0 likes
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