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The New Penguin Atlas of Recent History: Europe Since 1815
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The New Penguin Atlas of Recent History: Europe Since 1815

4.1  ·  Rating details ·  49 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
This bestselling atlas is an ideal introduction to the major events and developments in Europe from 1815 to 2000. It now includes more than fifty completely new and updated color maps complemented by accessible, concise text. This revised edition also includes a new section covering 1980 to the dawn of the twenty-first century, with information on a wide range of issues, f ...more
Paperback, 112 pages
Published May 27th 2003 by Penguin Books (first published 1982)
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Huntington Sharp
Sep 13, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Colin McEvedy's Penguin Atlas of Modern History was a fixture on my bookshelf as a child. It's Eurocentric and Anglocentric as hell, and gets the reasons for the American War of Independence wrong. However, his witty, concise description and maps of history from 1485 to 1815 have always stuck with me. "While Europe accepted Prussia's annexation of Silesia, Maria Theresa did not."

I finally got around to picking up the follow-up, used. McEvedy is even less apologetic about ignoring the rest of the
...more
Kevin Vejrup
Feb 15, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A run-through of European history from 1815 to 2000 told through maps. It makes some superficial conclusions, but they don't seem directly wrong. And the speed of which we are going through the events is great.

Of particular interest was the following:
-The Netherlands had been divided into protestant Holland and catholic Spain (now Belgium). The south was inherited by Austria, annexed by France, placed under Holland, rebelled and established itself as Belgium in 1830
-The French revolution of 1848
...more
Susan Rainwater
Dec 27, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In my late 20s, it dawned on me that part of my sketchy understanding of history (which I was attempting to remedy) was fueled by an even more sketchy understanding of geography. Why, in particular, did Galicia seem to be in both Spain and Poland? (because there are two of them) Why was the same piece of territory sometime called Alsace and other time called Lorraine? (depends on who owned it - France or Germany) What was up with all of these Italian city-states? Or German duchies? Why weren't t ...more
James
Sep 14, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, history
A breezy visual look of European history from 1815 to after World War II, as defined by the nation's borders. The book's format has the left-page text describes the right-page map, whether that's battle maneuvers, ceded territories or growing cities. McEvedy does a good job distilling the complex history down to a few paragraphs, and he's not afraid to poke fun at the statesmen of the era either. Sometimes his commentary can be a little too dismissive, but this is a nice visual reference and a f ...more
Dennis Boccippio
I found McEvedy's medieval Atlas to be the more useful (and entertaining); something about the heavy and recent stakes in the 20th century doesn't gel perfectly with his glib style (which is great from a distance). The selling point continues to be whirlwind but not shallow tours of the subject matter and the beautiful use of fixed-reference frame, simplified, evolving maps to tell the story. McEvedy's maps help you quickly understand the content as it strings over time.
Ike Sharpless
Aug 14, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: reviewed, maps
This is a review of all four "Penguin Atlases of...History". Four stars because of the engaging and informative chronological and topical charts, but not so much for McEvedy's left-page analysis, which was at turns soporific and, if i recall, borderline chauvinistic.

I imagine the interwebs can provide much more in the way of an interactive flashy light show-type map experience these days, but these books worked for me in the '90s.
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