Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “21 Nights in July: The Physics and Metaphysics of Cycling” as Want to Read:
Blank 133x176
21 Nights in July: The...
 
by
Ianto Ware
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

21 Nights in July: The Physics and Metaphysics of Cycling

4.25  ·  Rating details ·  32 ratings  ·  8 reviews
'Laugh along as actual doctor and professional nervous bachelor Ianto Ware turns his powerful doctoral brain to the art of bicycling. Documenting the history and mechanics of the machine itself, alongside a detailed analysis of the 2008 Tour De France and an exhaustive literature review, this groundbreaking new publication draws from the high-stakes fields of Cultural Stud ...more
Paperback, based on the original zine, 210 pages
Published 2009 by Format Press
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about 21 Nights in July, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about 21 Nights in July

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 4.25  · 
Rating details
 ·  32 ratings  ·  8 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of 21 Nights in July: The Physics and Metaphysics of Cycling
Sophie
May 23, 2013 rated it it was amazing
I borrowed this from my boyfriend who has recently started riding everywhere and I read it while my beautiful but clunky, heavy steel frame bike sat sadly outside, alone and cold. Then, while lapping up the musings on 20-something privileged whining which I relate too completely, I had an epiphany. About bikes and life and Tom Simpson, and now I'm determined to sell my clunky bike, get a speedy road one and ride no matter. I even bought gloves in preparation.
Victoria
Sep 01, 2011 rated it it was amazing
A history of cycling. But also a humorous examination of what's wrong with - and right with - the modern age.
Brian Degger
Aug 24, 2010 rated it it was amazing
a wonderfull book, 30000 words on bikeriding and the modern condition.
Caitlin
Jun 07, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Tour de France is always the exception for people like me - I don't really like sport, especially watching it, and I absolutely loathe the Australian cultural need to absolutely shove sport (certain sports) down everybody's throat.

And yet, I have a warm relationship with the Tour de France - my grandfather had been a cyclist, but of the older era when it was a sport that grew out of necessary transport and men who had day jobs. Ianto Ware uses his extensive knowledge of cultural theory to ar
...more
Nicholas Carlton
Sep 26, 2014 rated it really liked it
This book is pure genius, whose genius is built upon two oddly symbiotic foundations. Ware makes insightful, metaphysical discoveries about cycling, and the role cycling has for professionals and amateurs alike. Personally, I found this to be a deeply resonating journey about how I might be able to approach an understanding of what it means to be human, and what it means to ride. The lessons that the book covers throughout it's aptly named 21 stages (including a prologue) are lessons that everyo ...more
Patricia
Sep 27, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In twenty one chapters disguised as twenty one stages over various years Ware talks about the wins and losses and chances and the all too human stories that the Tour de France throws up. For Ware the Tour is not about winning or even about doping but about these human stories of men and bikes. That the Tour is so often won or lost on these chances makes it a sort of metaphor for life and Ware draws these parallels nicely. He never lets it get too wordy or too abstract and is always able to bring ...more
Patrick
Sep 14, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Recently due to the anticipated closure of the great website Adelaide Cyclists (http://www.adelaidecyclists.com/) I was reminded about this book - at the time I lived in Adelaide, the same city as the author, and I bought it soon after release. As the blurb says it's a great eclectic mix of discussion about cycling linked in to various political, sociological, and other discussions. So you won't enjoy the book if you just want a good cycling run-down - but if you're keen on philosophy as well, i ...more
Albert
May 27, 2015 rated it really liked it
The most satisfying read I've had all year: personal, insightful, well-researched -- not written just for cycling fans, but for anyone who craves another way to make sense of a few of the bigger questions in life generally. It's may not be the easiest title to order but the six-week back-and-forth with this tiny publisher in Australia was worth it.
Karina
rated it really liked it
Sep 25, 2016
Tom Bryan
rated it really liked it
Jun 03, 2016
Leigh Jamieson
rated it it was amazing
Mar 08, 2015
Matias
rated it it was amazing
Aug 27, 2012
Col
rated it really liked it
Apr 18, 2016
Simon Loffler
rated it it was amazing
Nov 13, 2011
John
rated it really liked it
Sep 09, 2014
Elise
rated it it was ok
May 17, 2015
Dean Fawcett
rated it it was amazing
Mar 10, 2015
Kirk Marshall
rated it really liked it
Dec 15, 2011
Alexander
rated it it was amazing
Mar 16, 2014
Joel D
rated it it was amazing
Feb 10, 2019
Cameron Solley
rated it really liked it
Feb 27, 2015
Stella
rated it really liked it
Feb 02, 2016
Matias
rated it it was amazing
Aug 27, 2012
Casey
rated it really liked it
Dec 20, 2014
Stuart
rated it it was amazing
Jul 08, 2018
Ben Mostafa
rated it liked it
Dec 19, 2014
Lindsay Foster
rated it really liked it
Aug 24, 2016
Talbet
rated it really liked it
Oct 05, 2015
Alyson
rated it really liked it
Sep 21, 2018
Tom Doig
rated it really liked it
Jun 30, 2014
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

News & Interviews

We're halfway through the year that time forgot! Ahem...I mean, 2020. Believe it or not, it's June. Traditionally, this is when the Goodr...
153 likes · 154 comments