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A Casa dos Espíritos
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A Casa dos Espíritos

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4.22  ·  Rating details ·  163,410 ratings  ·  6,746 reviews
O relato da vida de Esteban Trueba, da mulher, dos filhos legítimos e naturais, e dos netos vai levar-nos do começo do século até à actualidade; é toda uma dinastia de personagens à volta das quais a narrativa vai gravitando sem perder de vista os outros - mesmo depois de mortos. O temperamento colérico do fundador, a hipersensibilidade fantasista da sua mulher e a evoluçã ...more
Paperback, 360 pages
Published April 1st 1997 by Difel (first published January 2nd 1982)
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Oscar E There is quite a bit of domestic and social violence all through the book, but the fact is that it comes as a medullary part of the structure of the…moreThere is quite a bit of domestic and social violence all through the book, but the fact is that it comes as a medullary part of the structure of the book, not to mention that violence is a core behaviour in most city-societies in Latin-America. I rate it R. (less)

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4.22  · 
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 ·  163,410 ratings  ·  6,746 reviews


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Brina
House of the Spirits started my love affair with Isabel Allende's writing twenty years ago. I remember how the first line "Barrabas came to us from the sea" left me captivated and eager to read on. In college, I was fortunate that La Casa de los Espiritus was required reading for one of my classes, so I read the prose a second time in Spanish. Allende's writing is exceptional in both languages.

Recently, I completed Allende's memoir The Sum of Our Days. She reveals that Clara represents her own
...more
Claudia
Jun 16, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Gabriel Garcia Marquez comparisons aside, it's hard to review this book without references to the magical realism and the narrative styles of Latin America.

I truly believe that anyone not familiar with the above mentioned, would likely be a bit thrown, even put off by these influences. Still, this is a brilliantly written story, epic in its truest sense. Covering four generations of women (with a man as the common thread between them), it races through the simplicity of the old world into the c
...more
Emily May
When I was a kid, me and my brother used to spend most weekends at our grandparents house. And most of those weekends we would watch one of the same two movies on the good ol' VCR: Steel Magnolias and The House of the Spirits. No one seems to know the latter movie when I mention it, but it starred a bunch of impressive names: Meryl Streep, Jeremy Irons, Glenn Close, Antonio Banderas and Winona Ryder. My memory might be painting a better picture than the truth, but me and my brother LOVED the mov ...more
Kevin Ansbro
"If this world is going to be a better place for our grandchildren and great-grandchildren, it will be women who make it so."
-Isabel Allende.

Phewee!
The House of the Spirits is a tumultuous epic which chronicles four generations of two extraordinary families.
The eponymous house is large: it boasts three courtyards and a Chiléan version of the Addams Family.
Imagine too, if you will, Barrabás, the somewhat unnatural domesticated dog/horse, who was ill-advisedly fed olive oil until he covered the
...more
Aubrey
4.5/5

Esteban, Trueba,
how does your childhood grow?
With fear and guilt and such hard work
and a love that leaves you low.
In thoughts of grief and thoughts of rage,
and a slump of of broken land,
you will rape your heart out, Esteban,
set life to your demand.

Clara, Clara, clairvoyant,
how does your marriage keep?
With magic silent and so near,
to where your children sleep.
When tragedy has struck your home,
and the bull is in the shop,
reality will find you there,
your disengagement stop.

Humans, humans, high
...more
Ariel
Feb 10, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I have never in my life read a book where SO MUCH HAPPENS. AY. Generation after generation of DEATH AND DESTRUCTION, AMIRITE? I seriously don't know how to rate this book. Personally it wasn't a favourite, I found myself overwhelmed and bombarded with so much tragedy and injustice and found no love in any of the characters, but I really appreciated so much of what happened and really enjoyed learning more about magical realism.

Here's my video review of this! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awofw
...more
PorshaJo
Wow! If you look up 'epic family dramas, sweeping sagas' you are sure to find the The House of the Spirits at the top of the list. It's hard to capture what this book covers as it covers so much. The story of the three generations of the Trueba family. How their lives have changed over many, many years. Their loves, grief, joy, family, politics, greed, desires, and more. I felt that there was so much heartbreak and tragedy in this story. But I kept thinking about this one....even when I was not ...more
Luffy
I did not finish this book. I didn't think it was one of the worst books for me but it was simply not destined to entertain me. There was some potential in it. But it was disjointed. I tried further than I should've, because it's a rec, and I've already got 3 likes from it, but when a book is spurned in favor of David Copperfield, that tells the whole story. Another thing that made me try harder than usual is the cover. It's so wonderful. But the book, not for me.
Becky
Nov 26, 2009 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: foreign-language
2.5 stars, actually. (Still waiting for Goodreads to give me that half-star option.) Let's be honest, Isabel Allende is chick lit that you're not embarrassed to read on the Metro. It's got just enough faux-Garcia-Marquez, magical-realism-lite charm to fool people into thinking it's moderately intellectual. I don't have a big problem with that (as long as people realize what's going on) because Allende is a fine storyteller. This novel, her first and most famous, is a fairly traditional family sa ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
276. La casa de los espíritus = The House of The Spirits, Isabel Allende
The House of the Spirits (Spanish: La casa de los espíritus, 1982) is the debut novel of Isabel Allende. The novel was rejected by several Spanish-language publishers before being published in Buenos Aires in 1982. It became an instant best seller, was critically acclaimed, and catapulted Allende to literary stardom. The novel was named Best Novel of the Year in Chile in 1982, and Allende received the country's Panorama Lite
...more
Jen
Mar 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This took me some time to read as I wanted to savour it for as long as possible and not have it end. This is my first Allende novel which depicts an epic story of a Latin American family that spans 3 generations. Weaved throughout are hints of mysticism, history, political unrest, cultural richness along with vivid descriptions of a cast of characters in which some evoke ethereal auras and others violent furies.

Allende’s masterful style of writing is lavish with foreshadowing and thematic contra
...more
Luís C.
The House of the Spirits, a book we were advised one college professor by telling us simply: "It's a fun book."
This advice I followed - While "few" years later - proves to be notified.
Now that is my turn, I'll try to be more explicit than has been the teacher - That I thank!
The House of the Spirits is a novel that has it all. It is a family saga with the right amount of love and tragedy, which mingles the upheavals experienced by the Chilean company in the second half of the twentieth century. T
...more
Perry
Mar 31, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Passions, Politics, Psychics in Three Generations of Chilean Family


Isabel Allende's stunning saga, The House of the Spirits, spans three generations of the Chilean Trueba family ending a few years after the Sept. 11, 1973 government overthrow led by General Pinochet, the awful right-wing dictator who, with the U.S. govt's support, seized the chance opened upon fears that Marxists would take over Chile.

Ms. Allende', who to my mind should soon be Chile's 3d Nobel Laureate in Literature, wrote the
...more
Alex
Sep 06, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
100 Years of Solitude except not boring, is what Isabel Allende's 1982 landmark of magical realism is. Like Gabriel Garcia Marquez's epic, it follows several cyclic generations of a family through the history of a country. But it has an immediacy that 100 Years, with its frustrating mist, lacks; the story is better. It's a better book; it's the best book in the magical realism genre I've read.

South American literature is different from the rest - no, seriously, it is, I know that's a huge genera
...more
BrokenTune
Jul 02, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: reviewed
"Nana had the idea that a good fright might make the child speak, and spent nine years inventing all sorts of desperate strategies for frightening Clara, the end result of which was to immunize the girl forever against terror and surprise. Soon Clara was afraid of nothing. She was unmoved by the sudden appearance of the most livid and undernourished monsters in her room, or by the knock of devils and vampires at her bedroom window. Nana dressed up as a headless pirate, as the executioner of the ...more
stephanie
haha, so my sophomore honors english teacher decided he wanted to read a book with us for the first time, so he asked our department head to recommend a book. we all died, because mr. wells could not deal with talking about sex, and mr. hackling knew this, and he assigned this book. i mean, a couple of pages in, there's all this graphic rape in the fields going on! and then there's the creepy ass count . . .

i really loved the book though. it's layered, it's complex, it's beautiful. the imagery
...more
Nancy
May 10, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2008
I really wish I could say this is an amazing book, worthy of so much thoughtful praises, etc., but that would just be a lie. Given how much I enjoy good writing—and this book definitely has it all, like a beautifully crafted essay that speaks with prominent characters and conflicts between generations of families—it’s kind of weird for me to say this book is just okay. I mean, the only thing I like from this entire book is the language: the metaphors, descriptions, the lines that sound so poetic ...more
Lamski Kikita
Jan 12, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Allende's first and best work of art. The story of three generations of Trueba women that tells the history of a nation.

During the first 10 pages I was thinking to myself that there is way too much similarity on so many levels to One Hundred Years of Solitude, but why not, since it's the bible of Latin American magical realism?

In addition to Clara, the second Del Valle daughter who forsaw the future, communicated with spirits, and moved objects without touching them, and Blanca, her daughter w
...more
Markus
The House of the Spirits has a lot of aspects I normally wouldn't even consider reading about, and I only started reading this book because it is a famous classic that's been recommended to me several times before. I usually don't like historical fiction set in a modern period, and I am very skeptical towards the concept of a 'family saga', which is the major theme here. Nevertheless, rating this anything lower than five stars would be a great injustice to one of the absolute best books ever wri ...more
Maxwell
Nov 30, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: i-own-it, translated, 2018
[Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher with no obligation for a review. Also they sent it 2 years ago, so sorry, Atria! But I did finally get to it.]

How can so much happen in one book? And yet it's still pretty accessible and readable. There are a lot of characters—but the story is mainly seen through the lens of three strong women in a South American family: Clara, Blanca and Alba. They live through turbulent times, wars and rebellions, and are surrounded by violent men. Yet thr
...more
Phrynne
One of the problems with a family saga is that people inevitably have to get old and die and sometimes when the best character goes the story loses its focus. I enjoyed a lot of this book but felt that when one main character left the scene she was not really replaced by any of the others and my interest waned. I read on to the end but did not really become involved in the final chapters at all. Still a good book and I can understand why it is a favorite for many people.
Garrett
Nov 08, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone
Recommended to Garrett by: Cassie
Wow, what a remarkable novel. All over the book's jacket and in online reviews you'll find comparisons to Marquez's 100 Years of Solitude--rightfully so, I think. Both novels span decades and generations of families and are written in the magical realism style.
I can't say that I loved 100 Years of Solitude, but The House of the Spirits is certainly the best book I've read this year, my favorite book I've read this year.
I loved each character, particularly the women whose lives are the subject of
...more
Em Lost In Books
How I love these family sagas!
Joy D
Multi-generational family saga based upon the social, political, and historical events that took place roughly from the 1920’s to 1970’s in Chile. The narrative follows the Trueba family, including patriarch Esteban Trueba, his wife, Clara, their daughter, Blanca, and granddaughter Alba. It follows each character’s coming of age, their relationships, secrets, politics, and beliefs. Esteban represents the traditional conservative past. He is prone to bouts of temper, which lead to violent outburs ...more
Robert Beveridge
Isabel Allende, The House of the Spirits (Knopf, 1985)

The House of the Spirits has set a new record at Goat Central. I have been trying to read this book for three years. Three solid years (well, just shy. Another two weeks and I would have made the anniversary). Why did I keep trying? Because when I'm actually reading it, it's not half bad. But every time I put it down, there is nothing, not a single thing, about it that makes me want to pick it up again. So I'll end up going six to eight month
...more
Sue
I've not read much in the area of magical realism (except for my aborted attempt to read Borges' Ficciones). This was a much more successful reading experience I believe because it was grounded in an historical time/experience that interests me: the coming to power of the Socialist government of Salvador Allende and it's eventual overthrow by coup.

My experience of the book seems to have been opposite some others from what I have seen in some reviews. While I found the first half to be OK with so
...more
Abbie | ab_reads
Jul 27, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
Isabel Allende made it onto my auto-buy-author list with this masterpiece, and I will now be hunting down and devouring everything with her name on it!
.
The House of the Spirits (translated from the Spanish by Magda Bogin) is a sprawling saga that spans four generations of the del Valle/Trueba families with a healthy dose of magical realism. There are comparisons to Gabriel García Márquez's 'One Hundred Years of Solitude' and I can see why, except everything I loved about that book was multiplied
...more
Michael Finocchiaro
Isabelle Allende's first novel was a bildungsroman covering four generations of a family with lightly veiled allusions to actual people in Allende's family and circle of acquaintances and enemies. A true chef d'oeuvre, it is a book written with the courage of the daughter of the assassinated Salvador Allende and yet does not come off a just a bitter vengeful book but rather is a fictionalised history of Chile also incorporating the magical realism of Marquez with her own unique female perspectiv ...more
Nicole
Nov 29, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I have a really hard time getting into magic realism, I'm more of a realism-realism kind of gal myself, so I was surprised when I started semi getting into this. Although, characteristically, I got more into the less magic/more realistic parts of the novel. I think this book wants to be some type of a feminist novel, but it falls short in so many ways. Now, I am not the type of feminist who goes out looking for feminist novels (big Roth fan here, actually) but I do have a problem with anything t ...more
El
Barrabas came to us by sea, the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would use her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.

Thus begins Isabel Allende's debut novel from 1982 (English translation 1985). It amazes me that this is an author's first novel. It read to me as someone who has been doing
...more
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17,224 followers
Isabel Allende Llona is a Chilean-American novelist. Allende, who writes in the "magic realism" tradition, is considered one of the first successful women novelists in Latin America. She has written novels based in part on her own experiences, often focusing on the experiences of women, weaving myth and realism together. She has lectured and done extensive book tours and has taught literature at s ...more
“You can't find someone who doesn't want to be found.” 308 likes
“This is to assuage our conscience, darling" she would explain to Blanca. "But it doesn't help the poor. They don't need charity; they need justice.” 168 likes
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