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Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China
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Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China

4.21  ·  Rating details ·  19 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
This book exemplifies the best sort of work being done on Chinese religions today. Christine Mollier expertly draws not only on published canonical sources but also on manuscript and visual material, as well as worldwide modern scholarship, to give us the most sophisticated book-length study yet produced on the textual relations between the Buddhist and Taoist traditions. ...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published May 20th 2009 by University of Hawaii Press (first published January 2008)
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Mel
Buddhism and Taoism face to face looks at the exchange of scripture, ritual and deities in Medieval China. Mollier covers nearly all of my favourite concepts of Chinese religion, talismans, witchcraft, ghosts, exorcism and possession, astrology and Guan Yin. She makes tremendous use of the Dunhuang manuscripts, contrasting Buddhist and Taoists texts which have previously been studied separately. Her knowledge of both Taoism and Buddhism is remarkable and as such is able to look at similarities o ...more
Patricia
Nov 24, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: buddhism
Brilliant, absolutely brilliant book on how Daoism and Buddhism cosied up to one another from the 3-9C in China. Mollier is a superb scholar and this work deserves the Stanislas Julien Prize for Scholarship in Asian Studies it was awarded. Mollier's meticulous studies include examples of plagiarism, forgery, evolution and influence as these two religions (one native and one foreign) vied for popularity and followers in medieval China. There is an excellent introduction, which introduces the diff ...more
Alex
Nov 21, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Remember when... Buddhists copied Daoist texts and tried to pass them off as their own?
Jessica Zu
Mar 16, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: ge
religious identity is complicated
Jacopo
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Nov 12, 2015
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Stephen
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Jessie
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Mar 19, 2008
Michael
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Aug 16, 2012
Michael Lloyd-Billington
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Jul 14, 2017
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