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The Currents of Space (Galactic Empire, #2)
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The Currents of Space (Galactic Empire #2)

3.81  ·  Rating details ·  10,834 Ratings  ·  439 Reviews
[From Amazon.com]
High above the planet Florinia, the Squires of Sark live in unimaginable wealth and comfort. Down in the eternal spring of the planet, however, the native Florinians labor ceaselessly to produce the precious kyrt that brings prosperity to their Sarkite masters.

Rebellion is unthinkable and impossible. Not only do the Florinians no longer have a concept of f
...more
Audiobook
Published 2009 by BBC Audiobooks America & Doubleday/Random House (first published 1952)
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Sesana
Mar 25, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Currents of Space is technically in the middle of the Galactic Empire series, which is technically connected to Asimov's Foundation series. I say technically because The Currents of Space has virtually nothing to do with the previous Galactic Empire book, The Stars, Like Dust, and doesn't seem to have much, if anything, to do with the robot books that were set even earlier. It's more like these Galactic Empire books are serving as snapshots, showing the reader how Trantor grew as an empire w ...more
Manny
Dec 01, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science-fiction
So he's lost his memory, but he's sure there's some terribly important thing he knew that he just has to tell people. And as his mind starts coming back, he finds that the black hats are chasing him and want to make sure they can shut his mouth permanently before he...

I know. It's been done so many times that I'm sure you lost count years ago. I certainly have. But here's one detail I really liked. The aforementioned black hats are close behind him, he's in this deserted park, and he runs into t
...more
Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali
*No real spoilers, so please do read.*
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Asimov, an absolute science fiction great, is genius in his ability to remain timely with The Currents of Space, nearly 60 years after it was published. He has successfully woven a comprehensive and complex tale that weaves a valid story that features so many aspects such as politics, race and class, economics, love and loyalty, psychology, and good 'ole basic human weakness. You'd think that with all of that, The Currents of
...more
Michael Fierce
 description

The Currents of Space is a fast paced "lesser novel" by Isaac Asimov I found engaging and hard to put down.

Part 2 of 3 of his Galactic Empire Series, it does not have to be read with the others, as I understood each and every facet of the book and did not feel at anytime that I was missing something from the storyline, characters, or worlds involved.

Our main character, a man we know only as Rik, a Spatio Analyst - one who measures the matter of space, suns/stars and planets, and the outcome al
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Ms. Smartarse
Once upon a time, one of my classmates had enthusiastically shoved a rather drab copy of Prelude to the Foundation in my hand. Not sporting a particularly handsome cover, it didn't exactly excite me, but I read it nonetheless. And for the next few years, Isaac Asimov's reputation remained firmly parked on the absolute best author pedestal.

So when I picked up his books again, I was naturally expecting to be just as bowled over, excited, engrossed in the story... you name it. Is it any wonder tha
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Sandy
Aug 02, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"The Currents of Space," the third entry in Isaac Asimov's loosely linked Galactic Empire trilogy, is a prequel of sorts to book 1, 1950's "Pebble in the Sky," and a sequel of sorts to book 2, 1951's "The Stars, Like Dust," and if you by any chance find that statement a tad confusing, trust me, that is the very least of the complexities that this book dishes out! "The Currents of Space" originally appeared serially in the October – December 1952 issues of John W. Campbell's "Astounding Science-F ...more
Denis
Jul 06, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: b-c
Written in 1951, it is a great example of fifties classic Scifi. Better than most of its day. Asimov, at this time, is not quite as natural with characterization as is Heinlein, Sturgeon, de Camp or Pohl, but he cobbles up a good tightly written yarn here. I believe Asimov, based on works I've read so far, really wished to be a mystery author but loves science so much that he can't help but write in this genre.

The device of a planet having a unique production of a universally desired substance,
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Nandakishore Varma
This is one of the early Asimov novels, when his Galactic Empire was just beginning. A man has lost his memory because of psychoprobing (some kind extremely invasive and destructive futuristic procedure done on the human brain) by the powers that be. Why? is the question that he, and a lot of other people, try to answer. The answer leads to an unwelcome scientific fact that the authorities want to conceal so that they can continue their money-making activities, even while the planet goes to hell ...more
David
Jun 04, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Psycho-probed spacial analysts, kyrt pickers
Asimov has never been one of my favorite SF authors, but I fondly remember reading many of his short stories when I was a child. He seemed to do best in that form, as he was full of ideas and could pack his encyclopedic knowledge of everything under the sun into a few pages, and never mind the cardboard personalities of his characters.

The Currents of Space is set on the planet Florinia, whose inhabitants harvest "kyrt," which can be made into the most desirable cloth in the galaxy: it is super-d
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Hernan Garcia
Publicada originalmente en Trántor

“Las Corrientes del Espacio” es el segundo libro que compone la trilogía de Imperio, de la cual, lamentablemente, no tiene muchos aires de continuidad. Esto tiene su explicación viendo el orden en el cual fueron escritos. El primer libro publicado de Asimov fue “Un guijarro en el cielo“, ultimo libro de la trilogía, la cual es la saga intermedia ente Robots y Fundación.

Esto hace que no tengamos una “saga” como estamos acostumbrados a leer, donde la correlación
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Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine o
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More about Isaac Asimov...

Other Books in the Series

Galactic Empire (3 books)
  • The Stars, Like Dust (Galactic Empire, #1)
  • Pebble in the Sky (Galactic Empire #3)
“How then to enforce peace? Not by reason, certainly, nor by education. If a man could not look at the fact of peace and the fact of war and choose the former in preference to the latter, what additional argument could persuade him? What could be more eloquent as a condemnation of war than war itself?” 11 likes
“Galaxy, he hated them! He stopped himself, drew a firm breath...There was no use thinking hate...He had learned to bear in silence. He ought not forget what he had learned now. Of all times, not now.” 9 likes
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