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Angle of Repose
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Angle of Repose

4.27  ·  Rating details ·  43,892 Ratings  ·  3,684 Reviews
Wallace Stegner's uniquely American classic centers on Lyman Ward, a noted historian, who relates a fictionalized biography of his pioneer grandparents at a time when he has become estranged from his own family. Through a combination of research, memory, and exaggeration, Ward voices ideas concerning the relationship between history and the present, art and life, parents a ...more
Audio CD, 22 pages
Published March 1st 2010 by Blackstone Audiobooks (first published 1971)
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Deborah I think that the chapters on Leadville were among the most powerful in the book, mostly due to its exquisite description of the land and the mines at…moreI think that the chapters on Leadville were among the most powerful in the book, mostly due to its exquisite description of the land and the mines at that time in history. The Leadville mine in particular played a significant role in mining history. The book actually ends in Grass Valley, Ca., while the mining camp in Idaho is also written about. I think of the Idaho part as the more emotional part of their marriage, and the Leadville as a gripping description of what the land was really like. The Leadville writing is what stayed with me most, and and I have read it twice. I hope you liked the book..its my favorite! It is based on a true story of the artists life.(less)
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Randi They had an emotional affair for sure. As for physical, probably not "consummated," but there can be a lot of gray areas in between.
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Steve
Dec 12, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fellow Goodreaders know that feeling of exhilaration when a new entrant pushes its way onto a top-ten-of-all-time list. Wallace Stegner’s Pulitzer Prize winner from 1972 is my most recent example. Of course, Goodreads reviewers also know the pressure involved in justifying the choice. So what makes this one so good? As befits a top ten inclusion, here are ten factors that come to mind.

1. A Damn Good Story

Lyman Ward is a former professor of history with a bone disease that put him in a wheelchai
...more
BT
Aug 27, 2007 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Nobody
Recommended to BT by: Goodreads reviewers
I read this book based largely on the Goodreads reviews. Maybe I'm not as smart as other reviewers, or maybe other reviewers give it high praise because it was a Pulitzer Prize winner and they didn't want to look dumb (something to which I have no aversion), or maybe this was just a fluke, but I didn't think this book was worth reading. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. I started the book about 4 or 5 times, and when I finally did slog through it, it was in 5 and 10 page increments. I just coul ...more
Michael Finocchiaro
This book started out great, but quickly got repetitive for me. Learning on Wikipedia that Stegner derived (with permission!) large parts of it from real letters published the next year certainly took winds out of my sails. Several critics have mentioned that Stegner's version of Mary Hallock Foote diverges considerably from the original - a necessity for the author trying to fit his story to her narrative. That being said, it is impossible not to recognize the talent behind the writing and the ...more
Dolors
Mar 06, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Those brave enough to forgive
Little did I expect that the taming of the Wild West could be so intricately reflected in the ongoing evolution of a marriage, with all its tensions, compromises and sporadic moments of exultation; a marriage that seemed doomed to failure from the start.

Lyman Ward, retired historian and scholar, now prostrated in a wheelchair, sets his mind to write the story of his grandparents and their generation, of the many young adventurers who embarked on a non-return trip to the inhospitable Western land
...more
Beth
Apr 09, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I have read this book twice so far. The first time, I was a single college student. The second time, I had been married about five years. I'm sure I will read it again a few more times. And I'm sure that the more years of marriage I've logged, the more I will get out of this book.

Marriage, and what it takes -- and takes out of you -- to make it work is the main theme of this book. Stegner has some profound things to say about it. But even before I could personally relate to the story's main the
...more
Steven  Godin
Wallace Stegner was once quoted as saying " It’s perfectly clear that if every writer is born to write one story, that’s my story", this was referring to the tour-de-force novel that is 'Angle of Repose' which just about ticks all the boxes in terms of literary perfection, containing masterful writing of great prose and vision, an epic, engrossing and mature story charting four generations of an american family trying to carve a piece of history into the western frontier, and richly detailed cha ...more
Jonathan

Stegner is almost unheard of outside the U.S, and even in his home country he seems to remain at the periphery of the collective literary consciousness. For the life of me I cannot work out why. Apparently, even after winning the Pulitzer, the New York Times refused to review this novel.

The first point to note about Stegner is that he is a master of prose, a craftsman of great skill and control. Reading his work is a pleasure, pure and simple. There is perhaps something of the lyrical, or the R
...more
Sara
May 05, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone!
Recommended to Sara by: Elyse
Staggering. Riveting. Perceptive. Penetrating. Wallace Stegner knows how to get inside a marriage and pull at it and prod at it, until it settles down into what it cannot help becoming and finds its angle of repose. This story is the saddest kind of story possible, because it is about the loss of opportunity, the loss of happiness, and the loss of what might have been. It wrenches and tears and tatters the reader. I was gasping from the injustice, the cross-purposes, the lack of communication an ...more
Scott Axsom
Dec 05, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
Fiction moves me most when it’s most piercingly honest – when it reveals to me places in my heart that I’ve been afraid to recognize. Wallace Stegner’s Angle of Repose examines the part of us that's reluctant to forgive and that cannot seem to learn how to forget. The book is hauntingly true and ruthlessly introspective and it left me, at times, gasping for breath at the beauty of its lyricism - it could serve well as a master class in honest writing.

Stegner writes from the perspective of a not
...more
Ted
It's perfectly clear to me that if a writer is born to write one story, this is my story.
Wallace Stegner




Wallace Stegner (1909-1993), born in Lake Mills Iowa, died in Santa Fe. Historian, novelist, short story writer, environmentalist. Jackson Benson, in his Introduction to this edition, identifies the “major strands of his career” as his love of the land, his concern for history, his advocacy of cooperation and antagonism toward rugged individualism, and his dedication to writing. Some of his be
...more
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Wallace Earle Stegner was an American historian, novelist, short story writer, and environmentalist. Some call him "The Dean of Western Writers." He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972 and the U.S. National Book Award in 1977.
More about Wallace Stegner...
“Touch. It is touch that is the deadliest enemy of chastity, loyalty, monogamy, gentility with its codes and conventions and restraints. By touch we are betrayed and betray others ... an accidental brushing of shoulders or touching of hands ... hands laid on shoulders in a gesture of comfort that lies like a thief, that takes, not gives, that wants, not offers, that awakes, not pacifies. When one flesh is waiting, there is electricity in the merest contact.” 270 likes
“Home is a notion that only nations of the homeless fully appreciate and only the uprooted comprehend.” 197 likes
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