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The Ties That Buy: Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America

(Early American Studies)

3.55  ·  Rating details ·  29 ratings  ·  3 reviews
In 1770, tavernkeeper Abigail Stoneman called in her debts by flourishing a handful of playing cards before the Rhode Island Court of Common Pleas. Scrawled on the cards were the IOUs of drinkers whose links to Stoneman testified to women's paradoxical place in the urban economy of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Stoneman did traditional women's work--b ...more
Hardcover, 253 pages
Published February 1st 2009 by University of Pennsylvania Press (first published 2009)
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3.55  · 
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 ·  29 ratings  ·  3 reviews


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Josh
Nov 03, 2014 rated it really liked it
If you were a middling or elite white woman living in Charleston, South Carolina or Newport, Rhode Island during the late eighteenth century you were probably the treasurer and accountant of your household finances. You would administer family resources to purchase various commodities that included clothing, candles, victuals, or household ornamentation. Most often, though, you would have limited shopping forays to find and acquire these goods and instead rely on family members, friends, social ...more
Joseph Stieb
Nov 05, 2014 rated it it was ok
Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor’s The Ties that Buy presents the history of women in urban commerce in late eighteenth century Newport and Charleston. Her main objective is to put women back into the center of early American economic history by investigating their daily economic and social patterns of behavior. She succeeds in unlocking a history that portrays women as the lifeblood of local economies in which they created new roles and opportunities for themselves.
Hartigan-O’Connor’s effort to rescue
...more
Michael Hattem
Oct 29, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: early-america
This book examines the ways in which women in Newport and Charleston were “quintessential market participants” and “vital agents of connection not only within their communities but also between local urban economies and Atlantic ones." Hartigan’s story is not one of the empowerment of women through the extraordinary circumstances occasioned by imperial resistance and revolution. Rather, she delves into records from the Courts of Common Pleas, account books, newspaper advertisements, and personal ...more
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