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Iron Council (New Crobuzon, #3)
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Iron Council (New Crobuzon #3)

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3.69  ·  Rating details ·  11,514 Ratings  ·  752 Reviews
Following Perdido Street Station and The Scar, acclaimed author China Miéville returns with his hugely anticipated Del Rey hardcover debut. With a fresh and fantastical band of characters, he carries us back to the decadent squalor of New Crobuzon—this time, decades later.

It is a time of wars and revolutions, conflict and intrigue. New Crobuzon is being ripped apart from
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Paperback, 576 pages
Published July 26th 2005 by Del Rey (first published 2004)
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Owen Iron Council's story is set roughly two decades after the events in Perdido Street Station and The Scar (themselves both distinct from one another)…moreIron Council's story is set roughly two decades after the events in Perdido Street Station and The Scar (themselves both distinct from one another) and makes only brief passing references to them. The main thing you may miss out on is descriptive details of the world of Bas-Lag that emerged through the other novels. Having said that, Mieville still gives enough detail throughout Iron Council for it to stand on it's own, so if you want to jump right in then feel free to do so and don't worry about missing anything mission critical.(less)

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Patrick
Mar 04, 2016 rated it it was amazing
I've known *about* Mieville for a long time. But I don't know if I've ever read one of his books before. Generally speaking though, people I respect enjoy his books, and that's the best way I know to find new things to read.

Simply said? I really enjoyed it. Strange enough to be wondrous, but not so bizarre that it's nonsensical. Good story. Good use of language. Good characters.

Perhaps more than anything else, I was impressed by the moral ambiguity of the book. And I'm not talking about cheap
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Brad
Mar 25, 2008 rated it really liked it
Overtly political, teasingly intricate, and deeply intertextual, China Miéville's Iron Council is everything I expect to love in great speculative fiction, and nearly everything I know I love in Miéville's work.

Yet, since its publication, I have only read it once, and I still find myself ranking it third of Miéville's Bas-Lag books. I've been baffled by my restraint with Iron Council. My admiration of Miéville's other books is boundless, bordering on madness, and I haven't understood how a book
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Nataliya
Iron Council is China Miéville's most overtly political fiction work, but don't pigeonhole it.



Between the revolutionary fervor, fantasy, trains, and Western-like parts runs a common theme of love and the painful, desperate, doomed human longing.

I loved this book. It was not the insta-love like it was with "The Scar" but a long, careful, slow-to-build-up affair that by the end of the story fully blossomed. This book is fascinating, passionate, brutal at times, thought-provoking and deliberately
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Lyn
Jun 22, 2014 rated it liked it
Dear China,

It’s not you, it’s me.

I wanted to like Iron Council more, and there were parts of it I really did like, but the old magic was just not there.

I remember first meeting you on the pages of Kraken, and your fantastic images, scenes and people made me want to spend more time with you.

Then we spent some time together stepping in between Besźel and Ul Qoma and I realized the depth and virtuosity was more than a flash in the pan, you were on to some heady stuff, THE NEW WEIRD. I was hooked.

Th
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Mona
Feb 17, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition





I gave this four stars, but I also gave Mieville's "The Scar" four stars.

But they aren't equal. (This highlights the difficulty with the Goodreads rating system).

"The Scar" probably deserved a 4.5 (nearly perfect), where this rates more like a 3.5.

This is the third book in the New Crobuzon/Bas Lag series.

The first two were "Perdido Street Station" and "The Scar".

"The Iron Council" takes place in the same universe but many years later, in the nineteenth century (where the earlier two books were i
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Ivan
Apr 02, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Full review to come at some point in future hopefully.

For now like the rest of the series, combination of very weird but very well written steampunk and real world politics with ambiguous sides and no truly right answer.
Jacob
Jul 12, 2008 rated it it was amazing
December 2008

Gods and Jabber, I don't know why I love this one the most. It's not necessarily better than the other Bas-Lag Books (don't you dare call them a trilogy, don't you dare. Old China says he'll always come back to this; there's more to come), and it's nowhere near the worst. There's just something about this that feels so radically different, so alien, so apart from the others. Perdido Street Station was new and fresh and amazing, yeah, but it felt familiar enough--while still being st
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Apatt
Jul 03, 2013 rated it liked it
I love the first two Bas-Lag books but it took me ages to get around to this third volume due to the relatively high number of less than enthusiastic reviews on Goodreads and elsewhere. Yes, I can be swayed by reviews if the consensus opinion leans towards the negative. At the end of the day though I could not resist picking this book up as it is the last Bas-Lag volume for the foreseeable future (Miéville may come back to it but he seems to have no plan to do so at the moment). Another thing in ...more
Brad
We live in a culture that desires fragmented stories; stories that are told quickly and compellingly, so we can move on to the next tale. It is why we love visual forms so much. It is why YA fiction is increasingly popular with older crowds. It is why graphic novels are on the rise as a literary form. But where are the novellas? Where are books like One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, The Old Man and the Sea, Heart of Darkness, The Awakening, A Clockwork Orange?

I have been looking, waiting,
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Ben Babcock
Recall in my review of The Scar how I was whining about my opinion of China Miéville and his novels remaining relatively constant? How I wanted to read something different, something I could say didn't rank equally with the other three novels by him that I have read?

This is the story of why I should have been more careful with my wishing.

I knew something was wrong—perhaps I should say off—almost from the beginning of this book. The opening was grandiose in Miéville's usual style (which, if you'v
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A British "fantastic fiction" writer. He is fond of describing his work as "weird fiction" (after early 20th century pulp and horror writers such as H. P. Lovecraft), and belongs to a loose group of writers sometimes called New Weird who consciously attempt to move fantasy away from commercial, genre clichés of Tolkien epigons. He is also active in left-wing politics as a member of the Socialist W ...more
More about China Miéville...

Other Books in the Series

New Crobuzon (3 books)
  • Perdido Street Station (Bas-Lag, #1)
  • The Scar (Bas-Lag, #2)
“When the rich grow afraid, they get nasty.” 6 likes
“Imagine if one of them were turned. Imagine if one could be bought.'
'But they're chosen just so's they can't be bought...'
'History...' Jacobs spoke with terse authority. Brought Ori to a hush. 'Is all full. And dripping. With the corpses. Of them who trusted the incorruptible.”
6 likes
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