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On the Margins of Citizenship: Intellectual Disability and Civil Rights in Twentieth-Century America
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On the Margins of Citizenship: Intellectual Disability and Civil Rights in Twentieth-Century America

3.8  ·  Rating details ·  5 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
"On the Margins of Citizenship" provides a comprehensive, sociological history of the fight for civil rights for people with intellectual disabilities. Allison Carey, who has been active in disability advocacy and politics her entire life, draws upon a broad range of historical and legal documents as well as the literature of citizenship studies to develop a 'relational pr ...more
Hardcover, 286 pages
Published August 13th 2009 by Temple University Press (first published 2009)
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Blyden
Sep 10, 2009 rated it really liked it
This is a sociological history of intellectual disability with a focus on how both the concept of disability and the existence of civil rights have been variously socially constructed through U.S. history. The historical data come from case studies, the written discourse among the relevant social movements, agencies, and key figures, and judicial cases.

It is an important book, I think, for two key audiences: those with an interest in the history of intellectual disability, and those with an inte
...more
BHodges
Nov 06, 2012 rated it really liked it
Carey gives us a brilliant analysis of the shifting concept of intellectual disability (alt., idiocy, feeble-mindedness, mental retardation, and a host of other labels) through the lens of citizenship and human rights in the United States of America. Ideas about what it means to be human, a citizen, a free agent, are tied to discussions about rationality and the ability to communicate and make choices in public life. Carey demonstrates how discussions about rights intertwine with discussions abo ...more
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