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Full Moon at Noontide: A Daughter's Last Goodbye
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Full Moon at Noontide: A Daughter's Last Goodbye

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4.17  ·  Rating details ·  24 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
This is the story of my mother and father and my dashing, bachelor uncle, my father’s identical twin, and how they lived together with their courage and their stumblings, as they made their way into old age and then into death. And it’s the story of the journey from one twin’s death to the other, of what happened along the way, of what it means to lose the other who is als ...more
Hardcover, 255 pages
Published November 23rd 2009 by Southern Methodist University Press
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Rebecca Foster
This is a wrenching memoir about the last years of the author’s parents and uncle. The dynamic between this trio – lifelong bachelor Uncle Henry was her father’s identical twin and lived with them for many years – is unusual and makes for some narrative drama. Although the subject matter is similar to Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant?, Putnam’s tone is much more melancholy. A Hemingway scholar based in Washington State, she brings a literary style and a journalistic knack ...more
Jennifer
Jun 05, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: memoir, non-fiction
From my blog...[return][return]Ann Putnam has written a straightforward, honest and loving look at the process of aging, dying and death. A potentially frightening and morbid topic for many and yet Putnam writes her memoir, Full Moon at Noontide, about her parents, Grace and Homer, and her Uncle Henry, her father's twin, in the most loving and tender of manners. This is indeed a book about the struggles one faces at the end of life, yet it is so much more, it is a book about love, dignity, and h ...more
Athira (Reading on a Rainy Day)
Ann Putnam had just reached home after a day at work, when her daughter tells her that "Grandpa had a stroke", with "no preamble and no way to soften it".
Doesn't it always begin that way? A telephone call across the miles, one reality exchanged for another in an instant. Not that you weren't waiting for it all along in some dark place of your mind where you hold such things that cannot yet be brought into the light. You wish for a bad connection, crossed lines, a lapse in hearing, a rush into dr
...more
Christine Plaisted
Jun 21, 2010 rated it really liked it

4.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Sad, July 26, 2010
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Full Moon at Noontide: A Daughter's Last Goodbye (MEDICAL HUMANITIES SERIES) (Hardcover)
Full Moon at Noontide is a beautiful book about a woman who loses her parents and uncle, and the trials they go through along the way. This wonderful look at the end of life, is a beautiful tribute to her parents and a stark reminder to all of us who live in the "Sandwich Generation" of what is important, our family and the l
...more
Bookventures Book Club
May 27, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Full Moon at Noontide is a memoir of Putnam’s cherished moments with her family. Putnam is an English professor whose writing resonates with you. Aside from the fact that the material is touching, her writing just helps to push you over the edge until you do either one of two things: you laugh out loud or you just start crying.

The theme of this story was the issue of getting older and the little things that people do when they get to that stage in their lives. I found that the story was an attra
...more
Melissa
Jan 27, 2010 rated it liked it
This book was going to get a two until I read tearfully through the last quarter. I guess it took that long to connect. The story to tell was wonderful, but the author - though writing about her mother, father, and uncle - seemed disconnected. Considering the subtitle, I was expecting more of Putnam's thoughts and feelings throughout that period of caregiving, instead of a fairly objective re-telling of the trio's lives and last years together. But we all process grief and reflect in different w ...more
Christy
Jan 25, 2016 rated it it was amazing
A powerful book that really hit home for me in many ways. The writing was flowing and insightful, but I recognize that a lot of what drew me in was the relevance of what I'm going through in my own life right now. The location being the Puget Sound area didn't hurt either. Sad, thoughtful, empathetic, realistic. I could not put it down. I had to stop in places because I couldn't see the words through my tears. Ultimately uplifting, but with both feet on the ground.
Although it may be difficult to
...more
Rachelle
Mar 22, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the true story of old age and death in the United States, the nursing homes and falls down the stairs, the dirty details of dying and the transformative experience. Putnam uses beautiful prose that succinctly get to the heart of the matter, creating a surprisingly compelling read (you know how it ends before it begins) that I couldn't put down.

I loved this book, especially after having experienced much of the same with family members and in-laws, this story let me know that it is someth
...more
Judithproller
Nov 21, 2010 rated it liked it
This is a good book to read about death and dying . However, I thought it was more depressing than spiritual and accepting. Her losses were profound. Her perspective brought the process of the aging body front and center. I could relate to so much of it in reference to my parents and to working as a hospice volunteer. However, it didn't really provide mne with peace and acceptance. It is more about acknowledging what happens to the body as we slowly die. Shas writes beautiful prose. I thought it ...more
Kappy
Apr 17, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
A sobering but not hopeless look at aging. Also as a nurse I see the continuing need for coordination of care at the end of our lives.
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