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An Indian Odyssey
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An Indian Odyssey

3.78  ·  Rating details ·  37 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
The Ramayana - the Journey of Rama - is India's best-loved book, an inspiration to school-children, monks and moviemakers, yet it is virtually unknown in the Western world. The story of Rama, an exiled prince searching savage jungles for his kidnapped wife, it mixes Homer's Odyssey with Conrad's Heart of Darkness. It is an ancient epic, at once violent, spiritual and eroti ...more
Paperback, 368 pages
Published July 2nd 2009 by Vintage (first published 2008)
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Clive Walker
Martin Buckley's incredibly well researched investigation into the possible realities that lie behind the Ramayana. He reproduces the tale of the Ramayana, interspersed with his own travels around the holy sites featured, in such a way that you find yourself hurriedly turning the pages to find out what happens next to Ram, Sita, Hanuman et al. Buckley's writing is detailed, intelligent and interesting. He presents a contemporary India with compassion and insight bringing a viewpoint that is sens ...more
Aanjhan Ranganathan
Reading through the book, I went through a sinusoidal wave of like and dislike which culminated with me ending up on the author's side. One can sense the typical English view of Indian subcontinent and its people (superiority complex of the Brits) in the first 100 pages. This is the part of the book you have to pass through if you are a staunch Hindu and then I am sure you will start connecting with the author.

Buckley covers a lot of topics ranging from the LTTE to Indian Independence to presen
...more
Purabi
May 24, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
To say Buckley is honest about Indian politics, at times almost brutal, is an understatement but it opens one's eyes. He is fascinated by Ramayana, the Indian mythology of King Rama and his wanderings, and Buckley actually travels the same path that brings him to Sri Lanka. I found him very well-informed about Indian religions, politics, way of Indian life, the spirituality of the country whether it's found on a calm morning or in a cavernous temple. At times this book can be perceived as chaoti ...more
Sankarshan
Oct 13, 2008 rated it liked it
Super fast read about someone trying to get to the heart of the 'Ramayana' myth starting from Sri Lanka and thereon moving to Ayodhya. Quick inter-cuts of how the fascination of the author with the journey of Rama along with observations of a determined modern India make a nice and compelling read. There are witty one-liners, intended and unintended puns. This kind of book has its cousins and relatives from attempts by different authors. What makes it somewhat different is the lack of any slant ...more
Leon Taylor
Jun 01, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fascinating book. Combination of Indian mythology and travelogue. Really enjoyed it. Helping me plan for my upcoming trip to India.
Rasaya Marimuthu
Just got started a week ago. For a start, it is an intertwined saga of both the Sri Lankan conflict and the epic of Ramayana (the watered-down version, I might add).
Linda
Nov 29, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I loved this book! It took a bit to get into, but I like learning about India, from a foreign perspective.
Storyheart
rated it liked it
Aug 29, 2012
liza
rated it liked it
Apr 12, 2015
Sue
rated it it was amazing
Apr 19, 2011
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