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Federalist Papers Nos. 10 and 51

3.67  ·  Rating details ·  12 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
The Federalist Papers were eighty-five essays in support of the U.S. Constitution written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay in 1787 and 1788, and published under the pseudonym "Publius" in New York newspapers. They are invaluable resources for understanding the intentions of the drafters of the Constitution.(particularly important to adherents of the legal ...more
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Published (first published February 19th 2008)
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Kendall
Aug 19, 2014 rated it really liked it
(see separate review of Federalist #10)

Federalist No. 51 is the fifty-first Federalist paper, also written by James Madison. It was published on Friday, February 8, 1788 under the pseudonym Publius. Federalist No. 51 addresses how appropriate checks and balances can be created in government and also advocates for a separation of powers within the national government. One of its most important ideas and most often quoted phrases is, “Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.” Federalist No. 5
...more
Carla
Apr 08, 2014 rated it really liked it
"It is in vain to say that enlightened statesmen will be able to adjust these clashing interests and render them all subservient to the public good.
Enlightened statesmen will not always be at the helm."

Tucked into all of that big thinking was that little gem. Reading his biography prompted me to read a couple of these. Gosh, I wish we had leaders like this now.
TheObsessiveCupcake
Sep 22, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: school-books, f, 2016
Go Jemmy Mad!
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James Madison, Jr. was an American politician and the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817), and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Madison was the last founding father to die. Considered to be the "Father of the Constitution", he was the principal author of the document. In 1788, he wrote over a third of the Federalist Papers, still the most influential commentary on th ...more
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“From this view of the subject it may be concluded that a pure democracy, by which I mean a society consisting of a small number of citizens, who assemble and administer the government in person, can admit of no cure for the mischiefs of faction. A common passion or interest will, in almost every case, be felt by a majority of the whole; a communication and concert result from the form of government itself; and there is nothing to check the inducements to sacrifice the weaker party or an obnoxious individual. Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths. Theoretic politicians, who have patronized this species of government, have erroneously supposed that by reducing mankind to a perfect equality in their political rights, they would, at the same time, be perfectly equalized and assimilated in their possessions, their opinions, and their passions.” 9 likes
“on Democracies:

"there is nothing to check the inducements to sacrifice the weaker party or an obnoxious individual. Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.”
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