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In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto
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In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto

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4.07  ·  Rating details ·  88,379 Ratings  ·  7,131 Reviews
What to eat, what not to eat, and how to think about health: a manifesto for our times Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. These simple words go to the heart of Michael Pollan's In Defense of Food, the well-considered answers he provides to the questions posed in the bestselling The Omnivore's Dilemma. Humans used to know how to eat well, Pollan argues. But the balanced ...more
ebook, 232 pages
Published November 12th 2008 by Penguin Press (first published January 1st 2007)
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Kimball Because Scott Brick was the narrator for the audio book and I hate that guy. Worst narrator ever.

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Virginia Messina
Feb 16, 2008 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Actually, there is enough good material in this book that it probably warrants another star or two. But I was so alarmed at the amount of misinformation here that one star is the best I can do.

Michael Pollan is right about some of the big stuff. Nutrition research is badly flawed. It has sometimes led us down the wrong road (although it has also provided life-saving findings). The government is far too slow to change its recommendations and has strong ties (to put it mildly) to the food industr
...more
E.A. Quinn
Mar 04, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In the Buddhist tradition there is a level of hell whereby the dead, known as hungry ghosts, are trapped with enormous stomachs and tiny throats unable to swallow anything but the smallest bites of food. Their particular brand of torture is that they are always eating and yet their hunger is never satisfied. These hungry ghosts sound an awful lot like the modern American eater trapped in the unhealthy western diet demonized in Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto.

You may be
...more
Ken-ichi
I am conflicted about this book. On the one hand, I agree with Pollan's thesis: food science has not served us well over the past 100 years, and we really should "Eat Food. Not too much. Mostly plants." I believe that partially because of Pollan's arguments, and the revelatory reporting he did for The Omnivore's Dilemma, but mostly because I've studied biology, and have at least a limited idea of how complex human bodies and human food can be, and how evolution may not have prepared us for Twin ...more
Happyreader
I hated reading this book. And that's sad because I agree with his basic premise. Just eat real food. Not too much. Mostly plants. And I would add, try and get off your ass once in awhile. But this book was excrutiating to read. I read the first 50 pages, gave up, and went to the last section on his very basic food rules, gave up again. His language was all black and white with blanket condemnations and blanket recommendations, ironic since that's what he condemns in scientific thinking and food ...more
Jason Koivu
Oct 19, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, food
Books like this make me afraid to eat. Then they make me mad at the way I've been eating. Finally, they make me a better eater.

At the start, the idea seems simple: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." When I read that I thought, okay I can stop reading. I know that already, so I've got this shit down.

But what is food today? It may not be what you think it is. Most of what you find at the grocer's is not food. That complicates things just a little bit, doesn't it?

Pollan complicates that sim
...more
Will Byrnes
Oct 29, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: food-nutrition
One of the more pernicious aspects of nutritionism is that it encourages us to blame our health problems on lifestyle choices, implying that the individual bears ultimate responsibility for whatever illnesses befall him. It’s worth keeping in mind that a far more powerful predictor of heart disease than either diet or exercise is social class.
Pollan contends that Western society has replaced our relationship with food to a relationship with nutrition, to our great loss. Science has sought to f
...more
Charlotte
Michael Pollan is absolutely on to something with his central thesis; namely, that the American diet has been taken over by "edible foodlike substances" (ie, hyper-processed foods) and the American approach to health as it relates to eating has been taken over by "nutritionism" (ie, the idea that food is nothing more than the sum of its nutrient parts). He makes an excellent case that the current epidemics of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, etc. are the inevitable result of this perverse relat ...more
Trevor
Oct 14, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
One of the most remarkable meals I’ve ever eaten was here - http://www.royalmail.com.au/Pages/Foo.... Now, Dunkeld is a long way to go for a meal, even if you do live in Melbourne – and a ten course meal served over many hours with matching wines that costs an arm and three toes possibly isn’t something everyone would think of as value for money. However, unlike the said value for money meals I will never forget the evening I spent at this restaurant. Fantastic food, remarkable wines and delight ...more
James
Mar 01, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I am deeply ashamed, depressed, and embarrassed by the fact that such a book as Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food need be written, much less published, critically acclaimed, and enjoyed by someone such as myself. Pollan himself acknowledges the perverse state of affairs saying, “That one should feel the need to mount a defense of ‘the meal’ is sad, but then I never would have thought ‘food’ needed defending, either.”

We should be collectively mortified as a culture because though Pollan greets
...more
Ganesh
Jan 03, 2008 marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: environment, culture, food
Last night, I watched Pollan -- who looks just like one of my uncles -- on TV promoting this book. Something wonderful and empowering he said: the food industry pays very close attention to what consumers want.

In fact, they're terrified of us.

For instance, it only took a little over 100 concerned McDonald's customers writing to ask if it were true that the chain served genetically modified potatoes -- that was enough
to get the issue on the agenda at their shareholders' meeting.

Another example
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
  • Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health
  • Food Inc.: A Participant Guide: How Industrial Food is Making Us Sicker, Fatter, and Poorer-And What You Can Do About It
  • Real Food: What to Eat and Why
  • Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating with More Than 75 Recipes
  • Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food
  • Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty
  • Plenty: One Man, One Woman, and a Raucous Year of Eating Locally
  • Stuffed And Starved: Markets, Power And The Hidden Battle For The World Food System
  • Slow Food Nation: Why Our Food Should Be Good, Clean, and Fair
  • The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter
  • The End of Food
  • Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit
  • Hope's Edge: The Next Diet for a Small Planet
  • Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating
  • Organic Manifesto: How Organic Farming Can Heal Our Planet, Feed the World, and Keep Us Safe
  • Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly
  • Bottomfeeder: How to Eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood
  • Folks, This Ain't Normal: A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World
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Michael Pollan is an American author, journalist, activist, and professor of journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is also the director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism.

Excerpted from Wikipedia.
More about Michael Pollan...
“You are what what you eat eats.” 768 likes
“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” 548 likes
More quotes…