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Time to Eat the Dog?: The Real Guide to Sustainable Living. Robert and Brenda Vale
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Time to Eat the Dog?: The Real Guide to Sustainable Living. Robert and Brenda Vale

3.15  ·  Rating details ·  34 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
The world and its resources are finite, yet we are seemingly locked into a system based on growth: growth of population, growth of income and growth of consumption. This title attempts to uncover what sustainability really means.
Paperback, 384 pages
Published November 1st 2009 by Thames & Hudson
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Rachel
Aug 25, 2011 rated it really liked it
This book has been reviewed as being very dry, and I would imagine for those that don't work in the environment sector may find there is too much maths. However, I thought the way things were calculated allowed you to understand where the conclusions came from and how certain things can really alter your footprint on the world.....suffice to say I will never own a dog and be looking to visit Europe via train rather than aeroplane. A must read for those who want to live more sustainably!
John Bull
Mar 22, 2018 rated it did not like it
'A bit disjointed, over-elaborate, and vague, but you do appear to be heading in the right direction', or perhaps not.

The title of my review was inspired by a comment my physics teacher made on a piece of schoolwork of mine. When reading this book, I could not help but be reminded of my old teacher's kind but critical words, and wonder if the Vales truly deserved the same leniency the twelve-year-old version of myself had been shown.

In concept, Robert and Brenda Vale's "Time to Eat the Dog: The
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Aiste
Nov 16, 2016 rated it liked it
I started reading this book in search of tips on actually how can we live more sustainable. More sustainable from the environmental perspective. This book is great on providing analysis of our day to day choices but actually does not provide anything revolutionary. On the other hand, what evolutionary ideas am I looking for? Unfortunately, in this current overpopulated world the most sustainable living is no living. But lets come back to the book.
Interesting calculations, good tables for compari
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Margaret
Really liked it. Sometimes the stats got a bit boring and I found myself skimming them in places. But really good to have them to back up the argument if you need it. I really liked the fact that each chapter finished with a summary of what you should do/try to change. Means you have a shortlist of things to give to people who what to improve their footprint but can't be bothered reading the whole book.
Texas
Mar 04, 2010 rated it it was ok
Very uneven book. Some tips are good and easy to implement, but some ideas are either too extreme (eg. not to flash the toilet regularly) or unrealistic (do not get divorced until you have found a new partner).
Cara Kennedy
May 14, 2017 rated it did not like it
Shelves: architecture
I don't normally review books, especially if I've something negative to say, but after meeting Brenda, she affirmed that she was in fact, clinically insane. It's clear that she has no concept of reality, and definitely needs to get in touch with the real world. Going into depth wit what is wrong with her analysis of becoming more sustainable people would not fit in the 20,000 character limit Goodreads provides.
Maya Panika
Jun 25, 2009 rated it it was ok
A tedious, dry read which wants to reduce the entire concept of sustainability to the nuts and bolts of carbon production/reduction which is a long way from the core principles; sustainability is far more muddied and grey than this black and white list-book seems to suggest.

For the first few dips, it’s intermittently fascinating but eventually very repetitive! It reads more like a doctoral thesis than a book intended for mass/popular consumption, it's certainly not what the cover blurb would su
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