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Color for Philosophers: Unweaving the Rainbow

4.04  ·  Rating details ·  28 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
This expanded edition of C. L. Hardin's ground-breaking work on color features a new chapter, Further Thoughts: 1993, in which the author revisits the dispute between color objectivists and subjectivists from the perspective of the ecology, genetics, and evolution of color vision, and brings to bear new data on individual variability in color perception.
Paperback, 268 pages
Published January 1st 1988 by Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. (first published December 1st 1987)
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Nat
Jul 02, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Why have I waited until now to read this? I remember flipping through it in the Seminary Co-op and being deterred by the variety of different charts and what to my myopic eyes looked like the expression of some kind of unsavory scientism. That was sheer silliness. Hardin manages to communicate the basics of the science of color perception and at the same time show how mere conceptual analysis and thought experiments are totally insufficient for a philosophically adequate account of color. I rema ...more
Dr Brown
Jul 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Best book on color perceptions. Period.
Peter
Jan 22, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: neuro, phil, psych
One often hears that "people see colors differently depending on their culture" in support of a generalized concept of cultural or linguistic relativism. While I'm a fan of relativism in general, color perception is an EXTREMELY poor example of it: decades of research have turned up far more that is biologically determined then linguistic. Hardin ably walks through the field as it stood in the late '80s.

Hardin's primary aim is to advance philosophy by making a case that common philosophical tho
...more
Robert Bagnall
Dec 01, 2016 rated it really liked it
Bought this during my first degree in philosophy with a strong interest in cognitive science twenty-plus years ago, but never got past the first few dozen pages. I was determined to read it before I die; not sure whether I read it or merely looked at the words in the order they were printed, up to and including the appendix. Not everything stuck in my mind, particularly towards the end, but I think that's a reflection on me rather than the accessibility of what's here.
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Arthur Coleman Danto was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan on January 1, 1924. He is an American art critic and professor of philosophy. He is best known as the influential, long-time art critic for The Nation and for his work in philosophical aesthetics and philosophy of history, though he has contributed significantly to a number of fields. His interests span thought, feeling, philosophy of art, theor ...more
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