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When Old Technologies Were New: Thinking about Electric Communication in the Late Nineteenth Century

3.88  ·  Rating details ·  76 ratings  ·  5 reviews
In the history of electronic communication, the last quarter of the nineteenth century holds a special place, for it was during this period that the telephone, phonograph, electric light, wireless, and cinema were all invented. In When old Technologies Were New, Carolyn Marvin explores how two of these new inventions--the telephone and the electric light--were publicly env ...more
Paperback, 272 pages
Published May 24th 1990 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1988)
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Sarah
Aug 18, 2019 added it
Shelves: 2008
I only read parts
李 曾
Jul 21, 2017 rated it liked it
an interesting topic but not elaborate explain
Michael
Jun 08, 2010 rated it really liked it
In When Old Technologies Were New (1988), Carolyn Marvin explores the drama around new technologies in the 19th century (especially the telephone and electric light) "in which existing groups perpetually negotiate power, authority, representation, and knowledge with whatever resources are available" (5). She shows how old practices shift, new practices develop, and relationships change as people re-interpret their world (5). She defines media as "constructed complexes of habits, beliefs, and pro ...more
Elizabeth
Mar 14, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2009
I wish all histories could be this compelling while maintaining a high-degree of theoretical relevance. Marvin's history of electronic communication (think its earliest manifestations: lights, telephones) compiles an impressive and provocative array of primary source documents to expose the mindsets of these technologies' earliest users. She chooses examples that (one hopes) are representative, but that mostly stand out because they are memorable (Yale undergraduates unearthing a lamp post becau ...more
Arash Kamangir
به‌قدری که می‌خواستم روی کتاب وقت گذاشتم و بعد کنارش گذاشتم.
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Carolyn Marvin is the Frances Yates Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication.

note: there are two authors with the same name

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