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The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Inheritance Trilogy, #1)
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The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Inheritance Trilogy #1)

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3.81  ·  Rating details ·  34,951 Ratings  ·  3,920 Reviews
Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle.
Paperback, 427 pages
Published February 25th 2010 by Hachette Book Group Orbit
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Popular Answered Questions

Lilith Johnson Only if you want a 6th grader reading about 'a phallic shape that only gods possess, because no penis could fill her like this.'
Cameron All 3 books in the trilogy take place in the same world in chronological order, so reading them out of order causes major spoilers for the previous…moreAll 3 books in the trilogy take place in the same world in chronological order, so reading them out of order causes major spoilers for the previous books. There are overlapping characters and plot points, and actions in one book have consequences in the next. For the most part there is not a continuous plot between the books, but you could argue that there is a continuous narrative surrounding how the fictional world changes over time due to the combined events of the books.(less)

Community Reviews

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Rick Riordan
Aug 24, 2015 rated it it was amazing
I picked up this book after reading a thought-provoking article about the author in The Guardian: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015.... I really liked what she said about coming to fantasy with no interest in maintaining the status quo. She's right that so many fantasy books are about restoring order to a kingdom, returning a rightful heir to the throne, or getting back to the good old days by defeating some dark power that threatens to unbalance society. Jemisin, as an African American fema ...more
Regan
Feb 28, 2016 rated it really liked it
3.5

I dont even know guys
Patrick
Mar 21, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Very much enjoyed it. I have a great love of fantasy that does something a little different, and this book is a little different in a whole lot of ways.

Good book. Recommended.
Vinaya
I think I may have read too much fantasy.

I'm always apprehensive when I read a book everyone loved and can't get worked up about it. I was expecting this book to be radical and innovative and unusual. It wasn't.

You've read this before.
You're too harsh.
This writing style-

**********

Makes no narrative sense.

Seriously, what is it about this book I'm missing? What makes it worthy of being a Hugo and Nebula nominee? The choppy writing style felt weird to me- not because I didn't understand the tran
...more
N.K. Jemisin
Aug 01, 2009 added it  ·  (Review from the author)
Just got the ARCs. Reading for typos and errors, and also for the thrill of READING MY BOOK YAY WHOA.
Felicia
May 27, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Well, I really loved this book. Not since I've read Jaqueline Carey's Kushiel series have I been as enamored, in fact they are very evocative of each other, these series.

I had no expectations of this book, in fact I've had an ARC copy by my bed for like a year and a half, and for some reason couldn't get myself to pick it up. I think the cover implies a more epic fantasy feel than it is, really it would appeal to most female-driven urban fantasy fans, but again, i guess it's smart not to slap a
...more
Carol.
I've just realized I'm about to give two entirely different books the exact same rating for entirely different reasons. Somehow, that is profoundly unsatisfying to my bookish need to categorize. I need a GR ratings intervention.

Something about "The Hundred" fails to digest well. Falling back on my inevitable food analogies, it felt like all those ingredients I love were there--sugar, flour, butter, vanilla, chocolate--but scrambled, fried and decorated into a concoction I wanted to love but just
...more
mark monday
Mar 23, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: fantastickal
a pleasingly old-fashioned fantasy - and by old-fashioned, i mean the opposite of the dense, complicated, multiple perspective, incredibly epic mega-fantasies that have had the most popularity over the past couple decades. this is something different. the language is straightforward, for the most part, and certainly beautiful at times. although the mystery is a complicated one, and deals with rather large issues such as the making and unmaking of an entire world, it still feels somehow 'miniatur ...more
Bradley
I am and always will be a huge fan of Godpunk fiction.

There's a bit of it floating around out there, but most of it is hidden behind the cloudy minds and bodies of mere mortals, only occasionally poking its bright sunny head out to dazzle and amaze.

Sometimes it's the sun. Sometimes it's not. At the moment, I'm feeling the blaze.

Fortunately for us, we've also got authors with great and deep understanding of the greater and lesser mysteries, the writing chops to pull off an entirely new mythos tha
...more
Stephen
4.0 to 4.5 stars. I learned something while I was reading this excellent fantasy story by Ms. Jemisin that may seem obvious to most but still has changed my outlook on fantasy stories going forward. You see, I have always been a big fan of interesting world-building, compelling back stories and histories and unique magic systems and fantasy elements. The problem is that as you read more and more fantasy stories you start to recognize variations on all the well trod (and often trampled) ground an ...more
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N. K. Jemisin lives and works in New York City.
More about N.K. Jemisin...

Other Books in the Series

Inheritance Trilogy (3 books)
  • The Broken Kingdoms (Inheritance, #2)
  • The Kingdom of Gods (Inheritance, #3)
“In a child's eyes, a mother is a goddess. She can be glorious or terrible, benevolent or filled with wrath, but she commands love either way. I am convinced that this is the greatest power in the universe.” 538 likes
“We can never be gods, after all--but we can become something less than human with frightening ease.” 225 likes
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