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Degrees of Knowledge

4.03  ·  Rating details ·  35 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Distinguer pour unir, ou Les degrés du savoir was first published in 1932 by Jacques Maritain. In this new translation of The Degrees of Knowledge, Ralph McInerny attempts a more careful expression of Maritain's original masterpiece than previous translations. Maritain proposes a hierarchy of the forms of knowledge by discussing the degrees of rational and suprarational un ...more
Paperback, 528 pages
Published January 15th 1995 by University of Notre Dame Press (first published 1995)
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Scott Kleinpeter
Dec 26, 2012 marked it as to-read
Extremely deep account of Neo-Thomistic thought. It would take a good deal of time and concerted attention to read this. This is not a conversation I am as of now totally prepared to engage in. It is likely, though, that I'll arrive here eventually.
Seth Holler
Aug 27, 2013 marked it as to-read
I tried. Will try again someday.
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T. S. Eliot once called Jacques Maritain "the most conspicuous figure and probably the most powerful force in contemporary philosophy." His wife and devoted intellectual companion, Raissa Maritain, was of Jewish descent but joined the Catholic church with him in 1906. Maritain studied under Henri Bergson but was dissatisfied with his teacher's philosophy, eventually finding certainty in the system ...more
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“We do not need a truth to serve us, we need a truth that we can serve” 34 likes
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