Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “His Own People” as Want to Read:
His Own People
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

His Own People

3.13  ·  Rating details ·  16 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
The glass-domed "palm-room" of the Grand Conti-nental Hotel Magnifique in Rome is of vasty heights and distances, filled with a mellow green light which filters down languidly through the upper foliage of tall palms, so that the two hundred people who may be refreshing or displaying themselves there at the tea-hour have something the look of under-water creatures playing u ...more
Hardcover, 168 pages
Published July 1st 2007 by Kessinger Publishing (first published October 1907)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about His Own People, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about His Own People

Community Reviews

(showing 1-38)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Perry Whitford
American innocent abroad gets fleeced by faux-aristocratic European cardsharpers.

If only this flimsy novelette had been written by the original author of The Innocents Abroad! It may have raised a few chuckles if Twain had spent half an hour over it. The only remarkable thing about Booth Tarkington's take on this old chestnut is that something so unremarkable could have been written by a two-time winner of the Pulitzer prize.

Nicely illustrated and designed though.
Dave
Feb 09, 2009 rated it it was ok
Shelves: literature, fiction
After numerous stories which take place in the U.S., and the Midwest for the most part, Tarkington at last returns to Europe for the setting of his novella “His Own People”. Unfortunately, this one doesn’t recapture the fun of “Monsieur Beaucaire”. The story is light easy reading, but at the same time there is little of substance included. The book was originally published in October of 1907, and is the fourth of his novella length works, and his eighth book overall.

The hero is Robert Russ Melli
...more
Lydia
Dec 08, 2016 rated it liked it
This was a fun story, one I stumbled upon as part of a writing exercise. I found the opening to be beautiful, written in a style you would be unlikely to see nowadays. The story was predictable but entertaining. Since I found the most successful aspect of this story to be Tarkington's description of physical locations, I wish there had been more of that. There was very little, but what there was is memorable.
Pam
rated it it was ok
Dec 19, 2011
Barrett
rated it it was ok
Aug 10, 2013
William Smithwick
rated it it was amazing
Mar 30, 2016
Frances
rated it it was ok
May 04, 2011
Mj Moore
rated it liked it
Sep 13, 2011
Majenta
rated it really liked it
Feb 17, 2016
Cathy Gillespie
rated it liked it
Dec 28, 2015
Joanna
rated it it was ok
Oct 10, 2014
morgan Stapleton
rated it liked it
Aug 12, 2014
Natalat
rated it it was amazing
Jan 01, 2017
John
rated it liked it
Mar 31, 2014
Joey
rated it really liked it
Aug 27, 2016
Allison Eckberg
marked it as to-read
Jul 17, 2012
Shoshanna
marked it as to-read
Mar 13, 2013
Jennifer Ochoa
marked it as to-read
Feb 02, 2014
Jeana
marked it as to-read
Jan 25, 2016
Jessica
marked it as to-read
Dec 29, 2016
Ellen
marked it as to-read
Dec 12, 2017
Martha
marked it as to-read
Sep 14, 2011
Kirsten Graves
marked it as to-read
Aug 06, 2014
Sandra Pirtle
marked it as to-read
Mar 11, 2017
lynn
added it
Jan 26, 2013
Connie Bablitz
marked it as to-read
Jan 11, 2015
Susan
marked it as to-read
Nov 29, 2015
Lisa
marked it as to-read
Jan 23, 2016
skw
marked it as to-read
Jul 18, 2016
Debbie Hahn
marked it as to-read
Dec 02, 2017
Alva
marked it as to-read
Sep 27, 2016
Sally
marked it as to-read
Apr 04, 2016
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
73021
Booth Tarkington was an American novelist and dramatist best known for his Pulitzer Prize-winning novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams.
More about Booth Tarkington...

No trivia or quizzes yet. Add some now »