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The Power of Regret: How Looking Backward Moves Us Forward
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The Power of Regret: How Looking Backward Moves Us Forward

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3.90  ·  Rating details ·  4,785 ratings  ·  543 reviews
From the #1 New York Times-bestselling author of When and Drive, a new book about the transforming power of our most misunderstood yet potentially most valuable emotion: regret.

Everybody has regrets, Daniel H. Pink explains in The Power of Regret. They're a universal and healthy part of being human. And understanding how regret works can help us make smarter decisions, per
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Hardcover, 239 pages
Published February 1st 2022 by Riverhead Books
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Sylvia I agree with David. Lots of redundant anecdotes besides some helpful tips (which definitely require more elaboration). There is so much potential for …moreI agree with David. Lots of redundant anecdotes besides some helpful tips (which definitely require more elaboration). There is so much potential for this book to be better. Personally, I still find it useful and thought-provoking to consider my mid-life options. (less)

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Ryan Boissonneault
Feb 21, 2022 rated it really liked it
You could do your future self a real favor by reading this book. In understanding the most common things that people come to regret, you’ll know what to avoid in your own life.

Daniel Pink launched two extensive research projects in support of this book—The American Regret Project and The World Regret Survey—that collected the regrets of more than 20,000 people from the US and around the world. Pink then categorized these regrets into four core areas—foundation, boldness, moral, and connection re
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Aaron
Feb 02, 2022 rated it liked it
In a fitting moment, I considered whether I regretted reading this book.
Mostly because, like some of his other books, I felt like I was reading a large amount of fluff for a few nuggets of thought on the actual subject(sub-title)=. But, he writes the fluff in an entertaining enough way that I don't end up minding so much.
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Venky
Feb 04, 2022 rated it really liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
Never regret saying “I have no regrets”, is the powerful message that best-selling author Daniel Pink stives to convey to his readers in his newest book, “The Power of Regret”. As the title prosaically suggests, the hitherto scorned, sympathised and negatively viewed emotion of regret can be harnessed towards positive and fulfilling outcomes, both personal and professional. Regret is a phenomenon “into” which one can look, both going backward into the past and forward into the future. Hence befo ...more
Vivian
Mar 04, 2022 rated it liked it
Shelves: non-fiction, library
“Regret is not dangerous or abnormal, a dilation from the steady path to happiness. It is healthy and universal, an integral part of being human. Regret is also valuable. It clarifies. It instructs. “

Four Regret Categories
<>Foundation regrets: long term investments of emotional, mental, physical, financial security; i.e., education, health, saving, etc.
<>Boldness regrets: taking the leap
<>Moral regrets: failure to live up to ideals of being “good”
<>Connection regrets: emotional access to friends
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Zoester
Jan 31, 2022 rated it it was amazing
I've been a Dan Fan since Free Agent Nation, and his latest doesn't disappoint. In some ways, it may be (at least for me) his most relatable book. I'm in my fifties, and I've started assessing my life–– personal and professional decisions I've made; relationships that have endured decades (and those I've allowed to drift away); relationships with family, friends, business acquaintances, and neighbors; and interactions with strangers. Of course I have regrets, and of course I realize there are so ...more
Nabeel Hassan
Feb 18, 2022 rated it really liked it
Pink points to three benefits of regret:
* Regret can improve decisions. Studies have shown that when people think about what they regretted not doing in the past, they made better decisions later on.
* Regret can raise performance. Researchers have found that experiencing even vicarious regret “infused people’s subsequent deliberations with more strength, speed, and creativity.” (p. 47)
* Regret can deepen meaning. Examining regrets can help us clarify our life’s purpose and steer toward meaning.
D
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Mid-Continent Public Library
Regrets, we all have a few. In the Power of Regret, Pink argues why we shouldn't live by the motto "No Regrets" because regrets actually make us better. He outlines what he considers the four core regrets: foundational regrets, moral regrets, boldness regrets, and connection regrets. He shares research on how to undo or reframe those regrets so we learn from them, and also the benefits (and drawbacks) of anticipating regret in order to make better decisions. I do wish this was either really cond ...more
Georgia Scott
Feb 11, 2022 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: listened-to
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Courtney Smith Atkins
I usually like his books. This felt like a book in which the author ran out of ideas. Keeping a journal of regrets was recommended. That is a terrible idea.

Too much time was spent articulating regrets rather than how to use the experience to move forward.
Georgia
Jun 27, 2022 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: audiobooks, self-help
This is a whole lot of words to say that critical self-reflection is a good thing.

2/10
Sebastian Gebski
Apr 12, 2022 rated it liked it
Once I found out there is a new book by Daniel H. Pink, there was no other option - I put it at the beginning of my reading queue. But I failed to fall in love with it - the message the author is trying to pass here is far too contradictory to my stoic way of thinking.

To make it even worse, I'm not 100% certain how to interpret the message. It's clearly contradictory to "no regrets", so (according to DHP) the regrets DO MATTER, but I don't feel he sets a proper boundary between diving into the p
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Angie
Apr 04, 2022 rated it liked it
Regrets, we all have a few. In the Power of Regret, Pink argues why we shouldn't live by the motto "No Regrets" because regrets actually make us better. He outlines what he considers the four core regrets: foundational regrets, moral regrets, boldness regrets, and connection regrets. He shares research on how to undo or reframe those regrets so we learn from them, and also the benefits (and drawbacks) of anticipating regret in order to make better decisions. I do wish this was either really cond ...more
Emily
Feb 05, 2022 rated it liked it
3.5 stars. “If we know what we truly regret, we know what we truly value.”
I am intrigued by books that take a stance that is opposite to popular sentiment (like “The Upside of Stress”). This one takes on the “no regrets” platitude and gives a strong argument as to why regrets are an important part of our progress. Through research on regret, Pink helps us understand and optimize regret to make smarter decisions, perform better, and add meaning to our lives. He covers the four main types of regre
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Kristina
May 16, 2022 rated it it was amazing
I loved the stories and real-life regrets shared. I could identify with much of the sentiment that was shared. I also appreciated the guidance on how to take something that is usually seen as negative (regret) and make it into something that can change our lives in positive ways. Loved it!
Koit
Feb 27, 2022 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I learned about Mr Pink’s take on regret from a podcast I regularly listen to. The short overview the author gave on that was enough to make me pre-order the book—even if it took a while for me to actually get around to reading it. Suffice to say both the topic itself as well as its applications have been on my mind both before and after taking up the book, and this made it an introspective read.

I found the author’s style and structure suitable for the topic. He introduces the emotion, the histo
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Glenda
Feb 16, 2022 rated it really liked it
I’ve long been a fan of Daniel Pink’s books and had high hopes for this one, too, especially because I believe it’s human nature to have regrets, despite the proclamation of many to regret nothing. Pink breaks regrets into action and inaction and further distills them into four categories. Additionally, he offers analysis about how to move forward from regrets and offers insight into how to view major regrets in ways that make them easier to live with.

The book is timely for educators, many of w
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Christie Bane
Apr 03, 2022 rated it really liked it
This is a short but thought provoking book. Most people have regrets, and this book explains how regret can be useful in helping to make future decisions. It also explains how, if you’re bogged down by regret, you can soften that feeling by what he calls “At Least” thinking. (“I went to the wrong college, but at least I met my spouse there” etc.) Useful stuff although I myself truly don’t believe I regret anything. I think I usually made the best choice I could have based on the information I ha ...more
MJ
Mar 15, 2022 rated it it was amazing
I've always considered it absurd that so many people believe in the mantra "No regrets". I guess because I have so very many and I think about them all the time. I just could never relate or even muster up enough confidence to pretend I have no regrets, so I found this book to be incredibly validating and valuable. It talks about why regret is important and gives very easy advice about what to do with one's regrets. I liked it a lot. ...more
Stephen
Apr 17, 2022 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Between a three and a four on this as regret is a pretty interesting subject (especially reading other people’s which there were plenty of due to the extensive research done) but some of this felt like stating the obvious. However categorising regrets into 4 different types and snippets like the parts on silver medalists and the origin of the Novel Peace prize plus how easy and enjoyable a read it was, swings it for me. Definitely worth a read.
Cathy Hodge
Feb 15, 2022 rated it really liked it
Quick read that made me think. I have NOT thought about regret in a positive manner before this book. Whatever brought on my regret is not positive, but I can reflect on my life choices with a broader view at this point. Dan Pink discusses why we regret, how we regret, and how to use our regret for motivation into our future. I liked the research and information. Enjoy.
Lisa Lewis
Feb 27, 2022 rated it it was amazing
A fascinating and compelling read. Pink's deep dive into the research, relatable anecdotes and practical advice make this highly readable and insightful. As he notes, regret helps us do better tomorrow. Learning how to embrace the lessons regret offers us is at the core of this book -- a powerful reminder to extend ourselves grace and to use our regrets as opportunities for growth. ...more
Sara Alaee
When Dan Pink first sent out a survey asking people to participate in a study on regret, I was so excited! And of course I participated. "There is going to be a book about it?" I asked myself. "Right on time! I need it so bad! Perhaps those windows that I closed to the past can be finally opened if I only knew how." This was a great read... ...more
Tracy
Apr 03, 2022 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: books-for-nerds
This was such a nice read. I loved reading the regrets from people around the world and I also really enjoyed learning about how to deal with regrets. This is one everyone would benefit from reading as everyone has something in their life that they regret. This might help you to deal with that regret in a positive way.
Gina Davison
Feb 17, 2022 rated it it was amazing
Gave me a lot to think about.
Gwen
Mar 30, 2022 rated it really liked it
Gleaned lots of insights! It's okay to have regrets -it's HUMAN. Just understand them, don't let them "define" you and learn from them! ...more
Dan Connors
Apr 23, 2022 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2022-books
We've all done things in life that we'd rather not think about anymore. We've all made mistakes, hurt someone, made bad choices, and somehow moved on to better things. But what's the proper way to deal with those past snafus? Ignore them and get a "No Regrets" tattoo on your butt? Or dwell on them and become convinced that you're an irredeemably bad person? There is a third option that's the topic of this great book by Dan Pink on regrets.

Pink has taken on the idea of regret and begun the most
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Lauryn Ashley
May 26, 2022 rated it liked it
Overall, I found the book accessible and interesting. Some of the things that seemed to be written as though they were novel ideas seemed kind of like common sense to me, but at the same time, I’ve sat a lot in my regret and have done a lot of personal work on that front. Someone who has not done that may see it differently than I have.

This book felt a bit fluffy but amongst the fluff there were some really interesting nuggets that have me thinking about my own regrets and further more, how I ca
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Nas
May 06, 2022 rated it it was ok
Everybody has regrets; they are universal and they are a crucial part of our lives. This is a research based book about regret and what it can do to change our lives for the better.

There are 4 core of regrets as identified by Pink, which are:

1. Foundation regrets
2. Boldness regrets
3. Moral regrets
4. Connection regrets

Each of these regret categories bore its own definition and tricks on how to deal with it.

Personally, I do think that this book relates to me in a way; in a sense that it was
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JiaWei Chong
Mar 09, 2022 rated it liked it
This is a pretty straight forward, standard piece of non-fiction, whereby Daniel H. Pink quotes research done in the past on regret and adds in his own opinions to it. Not really an essential read as Pink doesn't really break any new ground - however, I do like some of Pink's ideas on how we might turn things that we regret into working on our productivity and our own selves.

It's an okay read, nothing ground breaking or life changing, but worth a read.
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Alex Givant
Jul 05, 2022 rated it it was amazing
Dalai Lama said: "When you lose, don't lose the lesson."

That's what this book about: regret help us to not lose the lesson.
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Daniel H. Pink is the author of six provocative books — including his newest, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.

WHEN has spent 4 months on the New York Times bestseller list and was named a Best Book of 2018 by Amazon and iBooks.

Dan's other books include the long-running New York Times bestseller A Whole New Mind and the #1 New York Times bestsellers Drive and To Sell is Human. His
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33 likes · 34 comments
“When feeling is for thinking and thinking is for doing, regret is for making us better.” 3 likes
“Self-disclosure is intrinsically rewarding and extrinsically valuable. It can lighten our burden, make abstract negative emotions more concrete, and build affiliation. So, to begin to harness your regrets to improve in the future, try any of the following: Write about your regret for fifteen minutes for three consecutive days. Talk about your regret into a voice recorder for fifteen minutes for three consecutive days. Tell someone else about the regret in person or by phone. Include sufficient detail about what happened, but establish a time limit (perhaps a half hour) to avoid the possibilities of repetition and brooding.” 2 likes
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