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Organic Community: Creating a Place Where People Naturally Connect
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Organic Community: Creating a Place Where People Naturally Connect

3.63  ·  Rating details ·  111 Ratings  ·  18 Reviews
Community is a fundamental life search and one of the key aspects people look for in a congregation. But community can't be forced, controlled, or easily created. The problem, says Joseph R. Myers, is that churches are too focused on developing programs instead of concentrating on environments where community will spontaneously emerge.

Organic Community challenges key leade
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Paperback, 190 pages
Published August 1st 2007 by Baker Books (first published May 1st 2007)
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Tom
Jun 30, 2008 rated it really liked it
Joseph Myers is the author behind this book and his previous bestseller: The Search to Belong: Rethinking Intimacy, Community, and Small Groups.

I was a little hestitant to get this book, not because his other book was bad (in fact, it was good)…but as I was flipping through it I found myself thinking….”his last book was good, but how does one begin to incorporate his insights and wisdom”. And while his latest book starts to answer that question it remains purposefully slim on “here is what you d
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Corey
Jun 08, 2012 rated it really liked it
In his 2007 book, Organic Community, Joseph Myers talks about the dynamics of community and hits on something that has been bugging me for years. His main thesis is that we can’t manufacture community or force it to happen, but so much of what the institutional church does is exactly that. As he says, “When we tried sharing our insights with the congregations with whom we worked, however, we found that church growth practices were so entrenched that proposing a different process of thought was m ...more
Robby Eckard
Apr 12, 2018 rated it it was ok
I feel like this book didn't say much of anything to be honest. The main message was "Master Plan bad, organic good" which the author drummed into our heads over and over again. That's the problem with writing a book about being organic; you can't really give any practical steps to achieving becoming organic, because to do so would not be organic. The book does give a series of 9 tools to doing this, but to me each one basically boils down to: "This thing you're doing, stop doing it." I do agree ...more
Bryan Reeder
Oct 14, 2017 rated it it was ok
Wasn't what I was expecting. A book more about what not to do than what to do.
Garland Vance
Oct 16, 2011 rated it did not like it
I found this book practically useless. It's a book filled with ideas about what community should look like and how to create an environment of community, but very little practical help (which the author admits in the beginning).
There are two major complaints that I have with the book:
1. The author sets up an unnecessary tension between organization leadership (vision, strategic plan, etc.) and organic order. Most of the tensions he creates are espoused by GOOD leadership practices. Good leadersh
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Kevin Beasley
Nov 14, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: ALL organizational leaders
This is an excellent book for organizational leaders. Moving from a master plan to organic order is the key to freeing your organization to accomplish its full potential. Prescriptive vs Descriptive leadership... Representative vs. Individualized responsibility, Bottom line to Story measurement... Bankrupt vs. Sustainable growth patterns... Positional vs. Revolving power... Cooperative vs. Collaborative coordination... Accountable vs. edit-able alliances... noun-centric vs. verb-centric language ...more
Lee
Apr 23, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: anyone who wants better relational connections
Recommended to Lee by: from reading the author's other book
This book is a challenge to really consider the approach to helping people build relationships which is really what "being" the church is largely about. Love the Lord our God with all our being and loving our neighbor as ourself. Without relational connections it is impossible to do either!

Joseph Myers is great because he says so much in so few words. A VERY quick read technically, but you will want to wrestle with the issues presented for a long time. The charts of comparison in the text are ab
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Joe
Mar 07, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: pastors, small group people
Recommended to Joe by: Leonard Sweet
Organic Community is basically a book about thinking different. It challenges us to consider the old ways of doing things, identify what in them isn't healthy, and identifying a different approach.

Among the ten ideas that are introduced, the one that has been most profound in my life has been the difference between an accountant and an editor.

The true challenge with a book like this is to keep the concepts in the forefront, otherwise you'll simply drift back into old patterns.
Resa
Apr 29, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommended to Resa by: Rustin
Good...describes a lot of what is going on at Vox Dei. Funny to see myself in the pages as God is helping me shift from master planner to organic girl. My fav quote I read yesterday: "Organic community is not a product, not an end result. Organic community--belonging--is a process, a conversation, a jazz piece, an elegant dance. It is not the product of community that we are looking for. It is the process of belonging that we long for."
Trish
Jun 23, 2013 rated it really liked it
Lots of good stuff about creating a space where community naturally happens. I love this quote " Organic order is open sourced, less concerned with holding on, more intent with going forward in the messy, relational, living verb of who we are."
Anthony
Sep 05, 2010 rated it liked it
Says alot of stuff that you intuitively suspect, but don't have the wherewithal to implement. However, it also dismisses some effective ministries.
Is not a book built on biblical foundations (not that is is unbiblical). It is sociological observations, not theological statements.
Matt Glidden
Aug 17, 2010 rated it really liked it
I read this for the second time--I have to keep reminding myself to move from heavy, top-down programming to natural, bottom-up community.
Organic order not master plan
descriptive not prescriptive
story not bottom line
collaboration not cooperation
environmentalist not programmer
Justin
Oct 22, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Really enjoyed the section about the 4 types of relationships that one can have intimate, personal, social, and noise.
Eric
Dec 15, 2011 rated it really liked it
Excellent book! It'll make you think, and reconsider some of the foundational ideas we often hold about "community" and how to nurture it and help it grow.
Brandon
Jul 19, 2009 rated it really liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
Great follow up to "The Search to Belong." I would think this book essential for any church leader's bookshelf.
Tim Beck
Jul 17, 2010 rated it liked it
Shelves: 2010
on page 128 of book. will come back to it later
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