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Apologetics to the Glory of God: An Introduction
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Apologetics to the Glory of God: An Introduction

4.10  ·  Rating details ·  788 ratings  ·  39 reviews
John Frame distinguishes three main kinds of apologetic: 1. Proof- presenting a rational basis for faith. 2. Defense- answering objections to unbelief. 3. Offense- exposing the foolishness of unbelieving thought. Frame offers a fresh look at probability arguments and gives special attention to the problem of evil. Particularly helpful are his extensive use of Scripture and ...more
Paperback, 265 pages
Published February 1st 1994 by P & R Publishing
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4.10  · 
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 ·  788 ratings  ·  39 reviews


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Paul
Jan 13, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: apologetics, van-til
I read this book while I was looking into the claims of Christianity. A friend of mine was attending Westminster Seminary at the time and he gave me this book so I could read the mock apologetic dialogue at the end of the book. I read that, as well as the rest. I was an unbeliever, but something clicked in my mind while I was reading it. I could see how Christianity could be rationally defended. How my critiques had been presupposing the falsity of Christian theism. My friend told the news to Jo ...more
Peter B.
Sep 19, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: theology, apologetics
A helpful and biblical outline for Christian apologetics. Frame defines apologetics as proof (the basis for the Christian faith), defense (answering objections to the faith), and offense (exposing the foolishness of unbiblical thought). He organizes his book by these three aspects. Frame does not deal primarily with the practical implementation of apologetics (though he does spend a chapter on it), but he does an effective job at explaining the framework and basis for apologetics. It was especia ...more
Jon Harris
Dec 09, 2018 rated it really liked it
I've been debating with myself for the past couple days as to whether I should review the book Apologetics to the Glory of God by John M. Frame. The book does make some good points, however, there are some issues I have with its communication or lack thereof. In view of its redeeming qualities, I've decided to recommend it but first I want to express these difficulties. Professor Frame seems to expect that his readers are already somewhat familiar apologetics and Reformed apologists since he doe ...more
L. R. Bouligny Bouligny
Jun 05, 2009 rated it really liked it
John Frame has written an excellent work as an introduction to the subject of apologetics. What makes it so helpful is that it is not only informative, covering a broad range of issues dealing with the subject, but it is also easy to read. Frame’s writing style makes the reader feel that he can grasp these often extremely technical subjects, and get a feel for how the particular topic operates within different apologetic contexts.
Accurately subtitled An Introduction, Frame’s work defines what
...more
Jacob Aitken
Aug 04, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: apologetics
My review will be on two lines. I will evaluate the book on its own terms and then offer my own criticisms. My criticisms should not detract from the book's initial value.

The story of Van Tillian presuppositionalism is similar to the Confederate army: it is a victim of its own success. Ever since the Bahnsen-Stein debate, presups think they can repeat Bahnsen's arguments and gloriously slaughter the opposition. It simply doesn't happen that way.

And that's where Frame helps us. For, another pro
...more
Adam Calvert
Nov 24, 2009 rated it it was amazing
This introduction to apologetics is of great value. While admittedly not being nearly as in depth as in 'Doctrine of the Knowledge of God, (DKG)' John Frame does a wonderful job of presenting a Biblical view of apologetics.

Frame has a good way of making things clear and orderly. And he presents a very compelling theory and method of argumentation in this book. At the same time, however, some of his thoughts raise questions for the reader that he does not answer. (Although he seemingly anticipate
...more
Chad Barnes
May 16, 2011 rated it it was amazing
This is one of my favorite books on apologetics mainly because of its thorough and honest treatment of the so-called “problem of evil.” Frame identifies/explains the flaws with a number of popular attempts to explain the problem (i.e., the free-will argument, the ), and essentially comes to what seems to the same conclusion as Paul in Romans 9. That said, Frame does provide wonderful detail and explanation along the way, defending God’s perfect goodness and absolute sovereignty while upholding h ...more
Micah Lugg
Mar 24, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: apologetics
Provided a clear presentation of presuppositional apologetics. After Every Thought Captive, this is the first book I'd recommend on the subject.
Charlie
Jun 23, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: apologetics
This is perhaps the only book ever written by a presuppositional apologist that is attractive even to those who differ with presuppositionalism. Success is the best evidence for a theory; this volume delivers a plan that may well lead there.
Karen
Jul 10, 2019 rated it really liked it
There are so many things I like about this book. Working in apologetics, there are several theologians I work with who seem to take slightly different approaches to the subject - some more evidentialist, some more presuppositionalist. Because we are worldview ministry and the Probe line is that everyone has a wv, basically we're all presuppositionalists to some extent. Frame's crique is quite helpful.
I also really liked how he divided apologetics into offensive, defensive, and proof, and gives b
...more
Christopher David
Feb 07, 2019 rated it really liked it
Frame is an amazing writer and in this work he distills Van Til's thought in apologetics in very easy to understand terms and explains exceptionally well the particularly Van Tillian terms. He also openly states when he deviates from Van Til's thought such as in the positive use of the transcendental arguement which is helpful to make the distinction.
This is a must read for anyone interested in Presuppositional apologetics.
Aaron Ventura
Dec 12, 2017 rated it liked it
Blazed through this in one sitting so I can't confess to interacting with all of Frame's points. I am very sympathetic to Van Til/Frame/Presup and have yet to hear a persuasive counter-position to the methodology of Bahnsen or Doug Wilson who I am more closely imitative of. Planning to read some anti-presup folks in the future.
Ana Bachand
Jul 16, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Great introduction to much of John Frame's thought and presuppositional apologetics (the two go hand in hand!). Recommended for those who enjoy Keller's The Reason for God and are looking for a little more of a challenge
J. Rutherford
Oct 26, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Fantastic book, my introduction to presuppositional apologetics and epistemology.
Jimmy
When I was still very new to Van Til’s Presuppositional apologetics, I attempted to read John Frame’s Apologetics to the Glory of God but eventually stopped because it seem to deviate from Van Til’s apologetics in some key areas. In addition, there were names of Christians Frame mentioned who were strangers to me. It seemed back then as if Frame was boxing some shadowy unknown interlocutors, whom he assume his readers were aware of. Some years later, I finally re-read John Frame’s intro ...more
Jason
Apr 12, 2008 rated it really liked it
Professor Frame introduction to Apologetics has attempted to pull off the near impossible: appeal to the in depth theological student and the general Christian reader. He nearly pulls it off. His ultimate goal, providing reasons for thinking and explaining the reasons of a Christian's hope is done well enough. The general reader who is not as familiar with debates within the apologetic community or in some of the philosophical and theological concerns may find some of the material hard to follow ...more
Luis Alexandre Ribeiro Branco
Jan 04, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: lidos-em-2013
In this book, John M. Frame sheds needed light on the message and method of genuinely Christian apologetics. Giving special attention to application of the truth, he insightfully examines apologetics as proof, defense, and offense. Frame clarifies the relationships of reason, proofs, and evidences of faith, biblical authority, and the Lordship of Christ. He offers a fresh look at probability arguments and gives particular attention to the problem of evil.

I couldn't find any weakness in the book
...more
Jeff Bettger
Oct 10, 2011 rated it it was ok
Shelves: apologetics
It took me a while to get into this book. I am not much of a guy for technical jargon, and this book is full of it. It is well crafted and has some good ideas here and there. It just kept putting me to sleep. However I am not much of an intellectual, and don't really try to pretend I am, so the manual type language of the book is what put me off. Big words without explanation of them make it a hard read. Many guys I am around love this book, but I am not one of them. I would rather recommend Tim ...more
Heather
Feb 07, 2008 rated it it was amazing
There are so many things I like about this book. Working in apologetics, there are several theologians I work with who seem to take slightly different approaches to the subject - some more evidentialist, some more presuppositionalist. Because we are worldview ministry and the Probe line is that everyone has a wv, basically we're all presuppositionalists to some extent. Frame's crique is quite helpful.
I also really liked how he divided apologetics into offensive, defensive, and proof, and gives b
...more
Catherine Gillespie
Feb 07, 2015 rated it liked it
Shelves: theology
I’m glad I read the book, although at times it was over my head or denser than I needed. Although it wasn’t so much a practical applications book, I do think that understanding the foundations of how to have a discussion about doctrine, sovereignty, the problem of evil, and other issues that I think come up naturally when you’re having discussions with people with whom you’ve developed relationships.

Overall I think the book was worthwhile and I’d recommend it if you want a good foundation in the
...more
Chris Comis
Feb 05, 2009 rated it really liked it
Shelves: theology, philosophy
Frame is such a clear and concise thinker and writer. This book is a great introduction to presuppositional apologetics. But Frame also leaves some elbow room for the classical/evidential approaches as well. I think this is Frame's strength over that of G. Bahnsen. He knows where to draw the line, and where to back off. Plus he's much more pastoral than GB.
Luke Stamps
May 09, 2013 rated it really liked it
Great intro to apologetics from a presuppositional/transcendental perspective. Frame incorporates the best of Van Til but corrects some of his inconsistencies and extreme positions. I especially appreciated how Frame recast the traditional theistic arguments in a transcendental light (ch. 4). The fictional dialogue in ch. 9 helps the reader to see how this method might play out in an actual apologetic encounter.
Todd Miles
Jan 14, 2013 rated it really liked it
This is an excellent primer on apologetics, focused on a presuppositional approach, but correcting some of the extremes of van Til. Frame focuses on apologetics as proof, defense, and offense. He also interacts well with arguments for the existence of God and evidentialism. Highly recommended.
Drew
Sep 24, 2013 rated it really liked it
Great introduction to much of John Frame's thought and presuppositional apologetics (the two go hand in hand!). Recommended for those who enjoy Keller's The Reason for God and are looking for a little more of a challenge.
Jeffrey Backlin
Mar 15, 2014 rated it did not like it
I'm not a fan of the presuppositional method of apologetics, it is circular. When I was looking into apologetics this book came up as recommended so I read it. Wouldn't recommend it, glad to familiarize myself with other views though.
Jeff Boettcher
Aug 04, 2012 rated it really liked it
This is probably my best recommendation for a one stop shop for Apologetics. He builds a strong case for how the Bible discusses apologetics, while at the same time recognizing the helpful contributions that traditional apologetics have made. Still not as practical as I would like...
Cho Yim
Sep 21, 2014 rated it really liked it
Great clear book to read if you want to understand presuppositional apologetics. Does a great job of summarizing Van Til's work and making it a bit easier to understand. Also a better apologetics read for understanding presup than the 5 Views Chapter on presup.
David
May 04, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: theology
Terrific presentation of apologetics, with a presuppositional view.
Jay D
Aug 09, 2011 rated it liked it
A few insightful chapters, but severe Calvinist anthropological errors.
Matt Smart
Jan 28, 2013 rated it really liked it
Great book! It's value lies in the author's approach to explaining and confronting the problem of evil in the world while there is an all-powerful and all-loving God on the throne.
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For his education, Frame received degrees from Princeton University (A.B.), Westminster Theological Seminary (B.D.), Yale University (A.M. and M.Phil., though he was working on a doctorate and admits his own failure to complete his dissertation), and Belhaven College (D.D.). He has served on the faculty of Westminster Theological Seminary and was a founding faculty member of their California campu ...more