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The Life and Death of a Druid Prince

3.71  ·  Rating details ·  197 ratings  ·  23 reviews
This thrilling human drama and spellbinding scientific discovery--the most sensational archaeological find of the decade--unlocks the mysteries of the Druid past. "Mesmerizing . . . a tour de force of scientific sleuthing".--Chicago Tribune.
Paperback, 176 pages
Published July 15th 1991 by Touchstone (first published 1989)
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Average rating 3.71  · 
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Cara M
May 15, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: nonfiction
A fast engaging read, that takes the discovery of a body in a bog as an open door into the lost, forgotten, and buried past of Celtic Britain. Although all conclusions are tentative at best, the clear presentation of sources and deductions allows the reader to accept this as a reasonable theory, though by no means concrete fact. Druids are always a contentious topic, whether they're treated as tree hugging nature worshippers, bloodthirsty savage priests, or political and economic powerhouses, ...more
Joan Brown
Jan 27, 2008 rated it it was amazing
FromLibrary Journal via Amazon
The discovery of a 2000-year-old man's body in a peat bog in Lindow Moss, near Manchester, England on August 1, 1984 brought the authors together to study his remains, specifically his last meal. Ross is a Celtic specialist and archaeologist; Robins a chemist specializing in archaeological work. Their collaboration has resulted in this engrossing archaeological study which unfolds like a well-told detective story. With clarity and scientific skill, they reconstruct
...more
Nimue Brown
Apr 04, 2012 rated it did not like it
This is an amazing read. In the sense that I was repeatedly amazed by the leaps in logic, the imagined details that mysteriously turned into facts, the reliance on recent folklore as evidence for ancient practice, and the internal logic that didn't hold together.
Nathan C.
I found the archaeological facts very interesting, as well as the historical background of the Celts around the first century B.C. (during which time the authors assume Lindow II lived), but the conclusions the authors draw--everything from the man's name to his nationality to the reason and date of his death--were very unconvincing to me. I would need a lot more proof before assuming one third of what they assume.
Deb White
Mar 01, 2012 added it
Shelves: other
This was one of the worst books I've read in a long time. It is highly revealing how our eductional systems have failed to produce quailified scientist for decades.
Laurel Bradshaw
Nov 19, 2007 rated it really liked it
Review from Library Journal
The discovery of a 2000-year-old man's body in a peat bog in Lindow Moss, near Manchester, England on August 1, 1984 brought the authors together to study his remains, specifically his last meal. Ross is a Celtic specialist and archaeologist; Robins a chemist specializing in archaeological work. Their collaboration has resulted in this engrossing archaeological study which unfolds like a well-told detective story. With clarity and scientific skill, they reconstruct the
...more
Gary
Sep 07, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: historical
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is a wonderful example of an interesting historical diversion on a topic which most of us spend little time considering, the archaeology of bog burials with respect to archaic Celtic society. Treat yourself and read this book. I for one deeply enjoyed the descriptions of Celtic life, the descriptions of the abiding Celtic traditions in the modern world, and the thought experiment of attempting to place an archaeological find in the context of a historic ...more
Dorothy
Jul 26, 2013 rated it it was amazing
If you like history and forenics this is a great read. It vividly brings to life what this Prince might have experienced while alive. Since he was preserved in a bog they were able to determine his station in life, his last meal and where he most likely lived. Totally engrossing and I'll probably read it again.
Bookendsused Pefferly
A compelling story based on modern Archeology/CSI methods. A 2,000 year old corpse if found in a bog in Lindow, England. A full history is literally pieced together before the reader. It is a thin book and a quick read, but it sometimes becomes mired in the reiteration of facts.
Erik Graff
Mar 22, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: someone interested in forensic paleoanthropology
Recommended to Erik by: no one
Shelves: history
A light, popular read concerning the discovery of body parts dating from the first century in an English bog. Very highly speculative, the portions about the exhumation of ancient remains are interesting, those detailing the authors' theories are unconvincing.
Stephanie
Aug 15, 2011 rated it really liked it
Fascinating nonfiction that makes good background reading for fiction books such as Siobhan Dowd's Bog Child.
John
Aug 02, 2014 rated it liked it
Shelves: 1history, box18
Interesting but a lot of assumptions.
Trishwah
May 30, 2015 rated it really liked it
Fascinating book about how archeologists do tests and think about what to make of remains.
Kelsey
Sep 17, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
interesting, though obviously with a hypothesis that is a massive reach. the background info is useful.
Annie Perriment
Feb 28, 2016 rated it it was amazing
One of my all-time favorite books. I've read this many times and find it absolutely riveting as well as incredibly enlightening about what was going on in Britain during the Roman period.
Jennifer Nesbitt
I read this book shortly after it was published, and it has stuck with me ever since. Like the authors, my imagination was captivated by the possibilities that could be this man's story.
Darius Rips
Aug 04, 2018 rated it liked it
Lindow Man, as he came to be called, was the extraordinarily well preserved body of a man who died between 2 BC and 119 AD. Anne Ross and Don Robins worked together to try to find out who was and how and why he died. The Life and Death of a Druid Prince presents their methods and conclusions. Scholars who study these matters have disputed their conclusions, but the book makes a good tale, and presents some fascinating details of how the authors reached their conclusions.

Don Robins, although
...more
Pam Baddeley
Oct 03, 2018 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history
I read this book a few years ago so have consulted notes made at the time:

This was a follow on from the BBC documentary 'The Body in the Bog'. Interesting but I could only go so far with the conclusions which in a lot of places took theory/speculation and treated it as established fact. In fact someone wrote a review that pretty much sums up what I thought along those lines - https://www.amazon.com/review/R33VAG5RSKIT0R/ref=cm_cr_dp_title/183-9137747-6337412.
Becky
Feb 12, 2019 rated it it was ok
Interesting content, but many leaps in logic stringing it together.
Mark
Apr 28, 2013 rated it it was ok
A highly speculative story, I found it hard to know if the book was to be taken seriously or if it was supposed to be a bit of fun speculation about what could have been. It seemed more to me that the authors had decided on a story and went out looking for evidence to prove that story, instead of the other way around - the evidence pointing them in the direction of the story.

All the same there was plenty of interesting information about the Celts and their Druid priests. Sometimes far too much
...more
Thom Dunn
On the discovery of Lindow Man in a peat bog in the English Midlands, 1984. Contends that "Lindow Man is found to be a Druid no bleman and priest who was ritually murdered in a spectacular Celtic May Day ceremony, sacrificed to appease the gods following the brutal invasion of England by the Roman army."

Really ! ?
Charly
May 02, 2015 rated it it was ok
Recommends it for: Anyone especially history fans.
i picked this up at a book sale because it seemed interesting. In fact the discovery process that helped identify the nature of the death and how it was determined that he was a prince was interesting; however the book is much more an academic monograph than an entertaining piece written for general consumption.
Richard A
Great story of a Druid .
Lucy Fuge
rated it it was ok
Aug 02, 2014
Gwyll
rated it liked it
Jun 05, 2012
Annie
rated it liked it
Aug 14, 2010
Diana
rated it really liked it
Sep 22, 2012
John Whitaker
rated it it was amazing
Oct 29, 2019
Helen
rated it it was amazing
Jun 18, 2012
Andrzej
rated it liked it
May 19, 2019
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