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The Poems of Wilfred Owen

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4.34  ·  Rating details ·  4,506 Ratings  ·  181 Reviews
18th March 1993 is the centenary of Wilfred Owen's birth. To mark the Event Chatto is reissuing the definitive single-volume edition of Owen's famous war poems, complied by Jon Stallworthy from his scholarly 2-volume edition. It has sold over 40, 000 copies, first under the Hogarth imprint, and then under Chatto.
Kindle Edition
Published (first published 1918)
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Lisa
Aug 17, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, poetry
I have been circling around World War I for a while now, reading novels that were published around 1915, such as The Voyage Out or Of Human Bondage, and poetry that referred back to that breaking point in history, for example Duffy's Last Post.

As "Dulce Et Decorum Est" is one of my all time favourite poems (if you can say that about something as sad and scary as those lines), I have been meaning to dig deeper into Owen's reflections for a long time.

I find it hard to describe my feelings toward
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Paul
Jan 14, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: world-war-one
I make no apology for starting with one of Owen’s more well-known poems Dulce Et Decorum Est:

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecs
...more
Carol ☀ Walking in Sunshine
I've started reading WW1 poetry every year at this time, last year it was Rupert Brooke Rupert Brooke this year I have sampled one of the most famous anti-war poets of them all, Wilfred Owen. Wilfred Owen

Read his Wikipedia page - his experiences were horrifying and he was killed in action a week before the Armistice. I'm going to be presumptuous and assume that this talented, sensitive young man would literally have been a shellshocked wreck if he survived. How could he not be?

From his most famous poem Dulce et Decoru
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Liz Janet
Sep 28, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favourites
For anyone out there that wishes to understand the effects of war in the minds of a young man, read his poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" as it is one of the greatest I have read, written in such a descriptive manner you feel as if you were the one dying in the trenches. Truly beautiful in the traumatic of it all.
Dulce Et Decorum Est read by Christopher Eccleston
Deborah Pickstone
Umpteenth re-read of some of the most powerful poetry ever written and a big reason I am a committed pacifist since I first read this collection as a child.
Charles
We covered almost all of Owen's poetry in my English class. However, with Owen, poetry is not a chore, but Owen's cognitive approach to war has really changed the way that I, and millions of others, view any form of belligerence (especially between nations).

As I have no doubt that most of you know, Owen's poetry is against any form of military adventurism, the callousness of society, politics and religion ('What passing bells for those that die as cattle?'), and (most imp. I guess) the plight o
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Yara (The Narratologist)
Here is what you need to know about Wilfred Owen: he died too soon.

Owen was twenty-five years old when he was killed in action, exactly one week before the signing of the Armistice would end the war. This means that all of his poems only fill up one 192-page collection (unfinished bits and pieces included) and it is not enough.

The first sixty pages or so are taken up by poems Owen wrote in his youth. Most of these are stylistic exercises, practice runs as he was trying to find his own voice. Th
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Joseph
Jun 02, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: war, poetry
Not poetry for poetry, but poetry expressing sorrow and futility of war.

"Earth's wheels run oiled with blood."

"Happy are those who lose imagination: They have enough to carry with ammunition."

Owen died on November 4, 1918 exactly one week before the armistice, almost to the hour. His mother received the telegram informing her of his death as the church bells were ringing, celebrating the end of the war.
Rachel Louise Atkin
Sep 23, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: owned
His poems are beautiful okay.
Caroline
Jun 20, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry, wilfred-owen
For me this remains the definitive edition of Wilfred Owen’s work. Of course there are other more complete books of his poems and his letters but my rather dog-eared copy of Dominic Hibberd’s edition was the one which introduced me to Wilfred Owen at school and led me to a lifetime of reading and re-reading these poems.

The photograph on the cover is of Owen in uniform and was taken in July 1916. To me as a schoolgirl he seemed stern and serious. Now he looks remarkably young. This book begins wi
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  • The War Poems
  • The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry
  • In Parenthesis
  • World War One British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg and Others
  • The Collected Poems
  • Undertones of War
  • The Great War and Modern Memory
  • The Complete Poems
  • The Complete Poems
  • The Complete Poems (Poetry Library)
  • The Complete English Poems
  • A Shropshire Lad
  • Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness
  • The Selected Poems of Tu Fu
  • One Hundred Poems from the Chinese
  • Crow: From the Life and Songs of the Crow (Faber Library)
  • Collected Poems, 1912-1944
  • The Oxford Book of War Poetry
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author by this name in the goodreads data base.

Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC was an English poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend Siegfried Sassoon and stood in stark contrast to both the public perception of war at t
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More about Wilfred Owen...
Dulce Et Decorum Est

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of disappointed shells that dropped behind.

GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And floundering like a man in fire or lime.--
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,--
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.”
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“Red lips are not so red as the stained stones kissed by the English dead.” 50 likes
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