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Identity and the Life Cycle

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4.02  ·  Rating details ·  454 ratings  ·  12 reviews
Erik H. Erikson's remarkable insights into the relationship of life history and history began with observations on a central stage of life: identity development in adolescence. This book collects three early papers that—along with Childhood and Society—many consider the best introduction to Erikson's theories."Ego Development and Historical Change" is a selection of ...more
Paperback, 192 pages
Published April 17th 1994 by W. W. Norton Company (first published 1967)
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Mike Morris multiple chapters on his theories and section on the individual crises. his theories begin with references to remembrances of the womb and advance…moremultiple chapters on his theories and section on the individual crises. his theories begin with references to remembrances of the womb and advance into adulthood in the confines of this book. He does make development more personal than social, but the social side is ever present in the material. Also, first half of book is all about the very young years, being notes from a previous book on childhood..... The second half jumps into post-adolescence. (less)

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Maira
Feb 16, 2017 rated it it was ok
i thought this book would never end.
Hyland
Jul 15, 2009 rated it it was amazing
This is an amazing book. It's one that works best when read during college, so that you can understand what is happening to you in the midst of what EE calls the "identity crisis." But the book even has a healing effect when read forty years late.
Vanita
Jul 14, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: uni
Leicht zu lesendes Buch über Eriksons Theorie der Identitätsentwicklung.
Arkadiy Volkov
Dec 05, 2010 rated it really liked it
Фройд с человеческим лицом. Надо еще его почитать.
Tarannom
Jul 08, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
دبدگاه روانی _ اجتماعی اریکسون نسیت به تحول انسان ، از جهاتی با دیدگاه روانی _ جنسی فروید. همسو است ولی از جهاتی دیگر متفاوت ، اریکسون انسان را منفعل صرف نمی داند و او را صاحب اراده و اختیار می داند که طی مراحل تحول دو بعد متناقض را سپری می کند. دو بعد مثبت و منفی ، با غلبه هر کدام از این دوبعد انسان. یا با روانی سالم و یا غیر سالم وارد مرحله بعدی از تحولش می شود ، جالب است بدانیم کودک تا یکسالگی اگر عاطفه و لبخند و توجه. متعادل را دریافت نکند. به تمام جهان بی اعتماد می شود و دچار بدخیمی و ...more
Howard Blumenfeld
Aug 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
This is classic developmental psychology. Erik Erikson, along with Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky, is considered to be pre-eminent figures in the field of early childhood development, but Erikson explores identity development across a broad spectrum, going all the way from infancy to late adulthood. While his theories are certainly patriarchial and mainly appeal to the upper class at the time, they provide an excellent starting point for modern interpretations of identity development. This book is ...more
Pradnya
Nov 01, 2019 rated it liked it
In-depth look at identity development.
Aaron
Sep 17, 2008 rated it it was amazing
A good read, if at times technical, and a good introduction to Erikson. This book provides an accessible overview of his theory of psychosocial development first proposed in Childhood and Society, without getting into much detail or illustration for the stages. Afterwards it explores in detail the stage of Ego Identity vs. Role Confusion, marked by Erikson's concept of the (now common term) Identity Crisis. Erikson illustrates this stage in great detail.

This book is notable for its detailed
...more
Karen Floyd
I found this difficult to read but worth it. The writing was dense and I had to go back and re-read sections to understand them, and even get out the dictionary. All, those psychological terms! There was also an assumption that the reader was familiar with the theories of Freud and Jung and other lesser known psychological figures. That made it harder to follow, but the book is based on papers read to collegaues, not necessarily for the general reading public. Valuable insights and theories. ...more
Liam
Nov 01, 2011 rated it it was ok
"In general, the concept of the ego was first delineated by previous definitions of its better-known opposites, the biological id and the sociological 'masses': the ego, the individual center of organized experience and reasonable planning, stood endangered by both the anarchy of the primeval instincts and the lawlessness of the group spirit." (18-9)

"Freud was once asked what he thought a normal person should be able to do well. The questioner probably expected a complicated, a 'deep' answer.
...more
Joshua
Sep 07, 2012 rated it really liked it
Erickson is gifted. I'm writing this review 11 years after reading it. I'm just looking at a note I put in the book after I read it.
So my reviews are a bit 'stale'...
Catherine Woodman
Jul 29, 2011 rated it really liked it
the classic text on the eight stages of man, which I use every week in the teaching of residents
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Erik Erikson was a German-born American developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst known for his theory on psychosocial development of human beings. He may be most famous for coining the phrase identity crisis. His son, Kai T. Erikson, is a noted American sociologist.

Although Erikson lacked even a bachelor's degree, he served as a professor at prominent institutions such as Harvard and Yale.