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Letters to Lalage: The Letters of Charles Williams to Lois Lang-Sims

3.65  ·  Rating details ·  17 ratings  ·  3 reviews
Paperback, 89 pages
Published January 1st 1990 by Kent State University Press (first published December 1989)
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3.65  · 
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Richard
Nov 07, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Letters To Lalage comprises the letters sent to Lois Lang Sims by Charles Williams when he was acting as her spiritual mentor. It is a rather short work but requires quite intensive reading. The relationship began in September, 1943. The last encounter between the two was three months before his death in 1945.

In the book we have a brilliant introduction by Glen Cavaliero which outlines the mystical theology of Williams, his use of a mythic approach and puts these into the context of his life. T
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Leandro Guimarães
Apr 12, 2017 rated it really liked it
Regrettably missing Lois’ side of the correspondence, casts quite some light on Charles Williams’ unhingedness — which is a pity since it seemingly killed one of the great geniuses of the XX Century way too early.

She was a young woman in process of reverting to Romanism, which is not actually that surprising given both Williams and Dorothy Sayers, a name quite present in these letters, were Anglo-romanists, and Tolkien a Romanist; even Lewis, the other big name presence, was a high-church Anglic
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Andrew Stout
Jan 28, 2013 rated it liked it
An insightful, yet sad look inside the last couple of years of Williams' life. These letters make clear that not all of his eccentricities were purely innocent. Still, these letters give us some remarkable phrases from Williams, like this one: "Time is the dungeon of my intentions..." (78).
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Charles Walter Stansby Williams is probably best known, to those who have heard of him, as a leading member (albeit for a short time) of the Oxford literary group, the "Inklings", whose chief figures were C.S. Lewis and J.R.R Tolkien. He was, however, a figure of enormous interest in his own right: a prolific author of plays, fantasy novels (strikingly different in kind from those of his friends), ...more