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Silas Marner

3.63  ·  Rating details ·  64,376 ratings  ·  3,080 reviews
George Eliot's tale of a solitary miser gradually redeemed by the joy of fatherhood, Silas Marner is edited with an introduction and notes by David Carroll in Penguin Classics.

Wrongly accused of theft and exiled from a religious community many years before, the embittered weaver Silas Marner lives alone in Raveloe, living only for work and his precious hoard of money. But
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Paperback, 262 pages
Published July 1st 2005 by Simon Schuster (first published 1861)
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Swapna Sundar pastoral, realism...I think it is a good contemporary commentary on the changing rural life of England through the industrial revolution.

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3.63  · 
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 ·  64,376 ratings  ·  3,080 reviews


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Howard
Feb 03, 2015 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Howard by: Ms. Park
Dear Ms Park,

I finally finished reading Silas Marner. Yes, I know you assigned it during my sophomore year in high school, but I didn't finish it until this past February. I know I passed the test you gave us on the story and I even made a passing grade on the paper that I wrote about the story. But I have to confess that it was Jake D.'s Classic Illustrated Comics version of the story that allowed me to make those grades. Poor Jake. Even after reading the comic book from cover to cover he still
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Henry Avila
Jun 26, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
An innocent young man Silas Marner, is accused of stealing Church money, the actual crime committed by his best friend, William, (a common occurrence ?) the culprit wants Silas's fiancee, Sarah. She soon rejects Silas, but not the treacherous William. The distraught weaver flees Lantern Yard, when his brethren do not believe him blameless in the affair, to the country village of Raveloe . A bitter broken man he becomes, his life ruined ... Apparently set in the English Midlands, during the Frenc ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
875. Silas Marner, George Eliot
Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe is the third novel by George Eliot, published in 1861. An outwardly simple tale of a linen weaver, it is notable for its strong realism and its sophisticated treatment of a variety of issues ranging from religion to industrialization to community. The novel is set in the early years of the 19th century. Silas Marner, a weaver, is a member of a small Calvinist congregation in Lantern Yard, a slum street in Northern England. He is
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Michael Sorensen
Apr 08, 2008 rated it it was amazing
When I was a teen, I heard that Silas Marner was a horrid old book about a rotten old miser and that I never wanted to read it. My Thanks to modern day Steve Martin who has updated several classics (ie Cyrano de Bergerac's 'Roxane') and 'Silas Marner' with modern movies that beautifully hold true to the books. The Movie was "A Simple Little Wish" and it was a beautiful story of a man and a child he adopts. In the credits I saw that the movie was based on 'Silas Marner'. At that point I had to re ...more
Luffy
May 08, 2018 rated it did not like it
Nul à en pleurer - that's the French phrase that sprang to my mind when I finished Silas Marner. It has a low average score here and it's not difficult to understand why, even to those who loved the book to bits.

I have no agenda, but classics and I rarely mix. I've been bitten so many times that I'm a gazillion times shy. I'm seriously considering of moving away from these tepid experiments and stick to my usual and benevolent hunting grounds as far as books are concerned.

Silas Marner is a right
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Jan-Maat
A slight, subtle and subversive fable, a post Christian novel, absurdly perfect in its balance and symbols. Filled with teasing humour and very careful intimate moments.

Yet because of that it seems unkind to even discuss it, since it is barely possibly to do so without revealing great chunks of plot.

As a very young woman George Eliot was a person of severe and earnest Christian faith, the pursuit of which caused her to abandon it, still young she fell out with her father over her refusal to go t
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Loretta
May 07, 2018 rated it it was ok
I was quite bored throughout. Can't say more than that.
Diane S ☔
May 15, 2018 rated it it was ok
I read this in high school many moons ago, and all I remembered about it was that I didn't much care for it, though could remember why. I picked it up again as it was a read for a group I'm in, and was very curious to find out how I felt about it now. Well, you can see by my rating how that worked out. As soon as I started reading I remembered why I disliked it back then. Too wordy, way too wordy, when one sentence would do, it takes four with all the descriptive meanderings. Was she paid by the ...more
Tyler Jones
May 13, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
2011 marks 150 years since the publication of Silas Marner. I can see why some modern readers would find the pace slow, the language difficult, the moral message too strong and the story too neatly tied up. That will happen if you insist that a mid-19th century novel be judged by early-21st century standards. I don't understand why some people refuse to read a book on it's own terms, but insist that the book conform to their terms. It's like they live in a city with great restaurants that repres ...more
·Karen·
The Fairy tale reading

Once upon a time, a poor linen weaver lived in a deep, dark, dank place. He had been much maligned, and had grown bitter and friendless. For comfort, he turned to work and building a crock of gold, which he kept hidden under a floorboard, and brought out at intervals to admire and gloat over. But one fateful evening, the feckless son of the local squire was passing by, and, having ridden his brother's horse to death by reckless hunting, and feeling sadly out of sorts at h
...more
Apatt
Sep 10, 2013 rated it it was amazing
"God gave her to me because you turned your back upon her, and He looks upon her as mine: you've no right to her!
When a man turns a blessing from his door, it falls to them as take it in."
One of the main reasons I like reading Victorian novels is for the eloquence. The above quote there is spoken by the eponymous Silas Marner, a character with little in the way of education or wealth, so there is a plainness in his eloquence. In his position I would have said "F*k off mister, finders keepers!
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Paul
Apr 14, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I didn’t read this at school and so managed to avoid the residual hatred that some have for certain classics as a result of poor teaching. The storyline and plot are well known. Silas Marner is a weaver in a Northern town and part of a religious congregation. He is falsely accused of stealing and his life falls apart. He moves to the village of Raveloe in the Midlands and lives alone on the edge of the community doing his weaving. Over time he builds up a substantial amount of money which become ...more
Terry
Feb 06, 2012 rated it really liked it
A strong 3.5 stars

As with Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life, the only other Eliot book I’ve read thus far, _Silas Marner_ shows off just how keen an observer of human nature Eliot was both in the adept manner she has at detailing the psychological motivations of her characters’ actions and in the more explicit authorial asides in the narrative in which she details her insights into how the human mind and heart work, and the justifications that we give ourselves for our actions. No one in h
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Chrissie
Eliot’s prose style is difficult. It is wordy. Grasping the points she is trying to make is thwarted by her dated and convoluted prose. The sequence of plot events is not hard to follow, but when she switches to her "lecture-mode" what she is saying becomes difficult to understand. Eliot lectures, she preaches, she uses this book as a podium from which she pontificates her views on morality, on goodness, on superstition, on money, on social norms, on class and on religion. I was curious; I wante ...more
Richard Derus
Oct 08, 2011 rated it really liked it
This book was a real-life Book Circle read that, well, got mixed reviews. Some people thought the writing was brilliant and others found it dated; some people thought it was too short, others too long for the short story they felt it truly was and not the novel it's pretending to be.

I think it's a lovely book. I think Silas is about as honestly drawn and cannily observed a character as fiction offers. I think the village of Raveloe is as real as my own village of Hempstead. It's a delight to rea
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Kim
Sep 07, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: audiobook

This is a book which countless teenagers have been forced to read as part of the school syllabus. For some reason I didn't have to read it when I was at school. I'm glad that's the case, because I've a feeling this would not have appealed to me very much when I was a teenager.

As has been the case when I've read other novels by George Eliot, it took a while for me to become fully engaged with the narrative. But once the links between the various characters became clear, listening to the audioboo
...more
Ivana Books Are Magic
Apr 25, 2017 rated it really liked it
I've read this book today and absolutely loved it. It is remarkably deep for such a relatively short novel. I don't remember when exactly I started reading it, but I know I made it to the third chapter in one go, found the story fascinating, but somehow I forgot about it until I picked it up again this afternoon. My favourite way to read doesn't include pauses. Obviously that isn't always possible but when I get the chance to do so I tend to use it- like I did this afternoon. I've really enjoyed ...more
Kelly ...
Apr 25, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 1001-books, classics
I loved this book. The story of this sad and lonely man who finds love and redemption when he adopts a girl was just lovely to read.

Eliot took her protagonist from a tight knit and religious community to a solitary existence and then into the hearts of another community. She explored the theme of individual versus community so beautifully. At the time this book was written a person's village was extremely important; a person's identity was provided by the community. We see this most definitely w
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Erin
I have spent so much of my year reading books that have been published in 2017, that there is something exceedingly special about diving into a book that was published in 1861. It was hard for me to consider that this was the same George Eliot that wrote The Mill on the Floss which I count among my favorite reads. Not that this was in any way a terrible story, but I believe I may be coming down from the 5 star high I had earlier today. A simple enough tale about a miserly weaver that is wrongly ...more
Cindy Newton
How could this be anything other than enjoyable, when it was penned by George Eliot? Although this was a simpler story with a more overt theme than others, like Middlemarch, it still provided plenty of food for thought. It's a simple tale of faith lost and regained, the redemptive powers of love, and the powerful effect that human connections can have on our lives. Lovely, and highly recommended for lovers of classics and excellent writing.
Alex
May 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Wall street douchebags who should reexamine their priorities, maybe adopt an orphan
Silas Marner is the most accessible of George Eliot's novels, by which I mean it isn't like 700 pages long, which is a problem for it because that also means it's the one you had to read in high school. You didn't like it. Partly because your teacher made the whole class take turns reading out loud - why would you do that? - and partly because even at her snappiest Eliot is not the world's most exciting writer. She is the world's smartest writer! So that's nice for her. But she's no Dumas.

And th
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BAM The Bibliomaniac
Catching up with classics

I am surprised at how much I love ❤ this story!

Marler is a loner in a village where everyone knows everyone. He is a weaver who minds his own business and gets talked about a lot. He hoards his wages and eats porridge.
On the other side of town there lives a squire and his disreputable sons who cause nothing but trouble.
These characters' lives will converge in ways in which none will fully recover.
This book is truly tragic in some parts and heartwarming in others. It's
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Kressel Housman
Those of you who’ve been following my reviews for a while may remember that I have an ambition of going to grad school and writing a thesis or dissertation on George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda. Well, even though I haven’t figured out a way to pay for grad school yet, I figured I might as well do the research on my own. So I’ve begun reading George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda Notebooks, which no doubt will take me a while, but I figured it was also high time I completed her entire oeuvre, and Silas Marner ...more
Veronique
Jul 27, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
4.5

“A child, more than all other gifts
That earth can offer to declining man,
Brings hope with it, and forward-looking thoughts.”
—Wordsworth.

It has been a while since I have been able to read a classic, and this was a title I very much wanted to, especially since Middlemarch is one of my favourite novels. Having said this, George Eliot and her masterful writing style are still a little intimidating to me.

Silas Marner is a short novel and deceptively compelling. The narrator follows a solitary
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Werner
Mar 02, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Fans of 19th century fiction
Recommended to Werner by: It was required reading in high school
Required reading assignments in school often aren't the most enjoyable reads, and the element of compulsion may prejudice the reader against them, but this novel proved to be a happy exception to that pattern! (Obviously, given the time frame, I read it in a different edition than the one above.) The above description of "faith and society" as Eliot's subject matter here is apt. After being cast out by his narrow religious sect when he is framed for a theft, Silas becomes an embittered and reclu ...more
Ziad Nadda
Oct 24, 2016 rated it it was amazing
An excellent project of retribution and compensation. It broke my heart to pieces in its bloody dark unfair scenes. However, it flushed the happiness in my cheeks of its happy joyful ending scenes. My heart will always remember Silas Marner, Eppie Marner, Godfrey case, and Nancy Lammeter of Raveloe.

P.S note:
Priscilla (Nancy's sister) is hilarious and I think she is my favorite character in the novel.
Jon(athan) Nakapalau
Sep 18, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: classics, favorites
I think that there are many people around the world who are accused of a crime they did not commit. Silas Marner does not let such accusations define who he is...and his actions speak louder than those who have criminally accused him of a crime.
Serbay GÜL
May 17, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Özellikle ülkemizde hak ettiği ilgi ve alakayı bir türlü görememiş klasikler listesinde başı çekmektedir. Dönem insanı sorunlarına eğilen realist bir kitaptır. Kitapta din ögeleri fazlasıyla kullanılmaktadır ve kiliselere ve cemaatlere duyulan güvensizlikle ilgili, Silas'ın maneviyatı terk etmesi üzerinden eleştiler getirilmektedir. İnsanların acımasız kurnazlıklar peşinde koşarken , kaderin de onlara ne kurnazlıklar ve oyunlar hazırladığına dair olgularla dolu kitap.

Silas Marner bir gün üyesi
...more
Olivia Chanel's Galaxy of Books
I liked this book a lot more than I thought I would, the second half especially delighted me. The characters were all multi-dimensional with both good and bad sides. My favorite characters were Silas, Eppie, and Nancy. My least favorite characters were the ones in the Cass family, though Godfrey did have his moments (I guess).
Maria
It has been a very long time since I felt this much resistance against finishing a book. I just wanted to stay with it longer. Making myself read the last couple of pages took quite a big concious effort. I just read this at exactly the right moment.

In the very beginning I wasn't overly enthusiastic about this book. I had already read Middlemarch earlier and was surprised at the simplicity and straightforwardness of Silas Marner. (view spoiler)
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All About Books: Silas Marner - May June 2018 Classic Group Read 125 85 Jun 10, 2018 06:52PM  
Catching up on Cl...: Silas Marner - SPOILERS 39 63 Jun 06, 2018 03:11PM  
Catching up on Cl...: Silas Marner - NO spoilers 20 57 May 29, 2018 05:59AM  
Old Books, New Re...: * Silas Marner - Background and Resources 6 21 Apr 03, 2018 09:26AM  
Old Books, New Re...: Silas Marner - Week 3 1 3 Mar 31, 2018 11:25AM  
Old Books, New Re...: Silas Marner - Week 2 1 5 Mar 31, 2018 11:23AM  
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Mary Ann Evans, known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She was born in 1819 at a farmstead in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England, where her father was estate manager. Mary Ann, the youngest child and a favorite of her father's, received a good education for a young woman of her day. Influenced by a ...more
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