Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Quantum Reality: The Quest for the Real Meaning of Quantum Mechanics - a Game of Theories” as Want to Read:
Quantum Reality: The Quest for the Real Meaning of Quantum Mechanics - a Game of Theories
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Quantum Reality: The Quest for the Real Meaning of Quantum Mechanics - a Game of Theories

4.14  ·  Rating details ·  21 ratings  ·  8 reviews
Quantum mechanics is an extraordinarily successful scientific theory. It is also completely mad. Although the theory quite obviously works, it leaves us chasing ghosts and phantoms; particles that are waves and waves that are particles; cats that are at once both alive and dead; and lots of seemingly spooky goings-on. But if we're prepared to be a little more specific abou ...more
Hardcover, 320 pages
Published June 25th 2020 by Oxford University Press
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Quantum Reality, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Quantum Reality

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-52
Average rating 4.14  · 
Rating details
 ·  21 ratings  ·  8 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Quantum Reality: The Quest for the Real Meaning of Quantum Mechanics - a Game of Theories
Brian Clegg
Oct 28, 2020 rated it really liked it
At one time it was popular amongst some physicists to be extremely critical of philosophy. For example, in their book The Grand Design, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow aimed to answer a series of what have long been seen as philosophical (such as 'Why are we here?', 'What is the nature of reality?' and 'Did the universe need a creator?') by ignoring philosophy and taking a purely scientific viewpoint. Philosophy, those authors assured us, like religion, was now dead.

I'm afraid Hawking and M
...more
Dan Graser
Sep 14, 2020 rated it really liked it
Rare among Jim Baggott's ouput, this volume is actually mostly focused on philosophy of science as opposed to popularizing difficult concepts of specific scientific theories. While it is absolutely true that he discusses quantum mechanics throughout, the focus is on the larger philosophical disagreements this remarkable theory has spawned. He is particularly strong on the metaphysical presuppositions that even the most ardent naturalist/realist physicists begrudgingly (or obliviously) accept. I' ...more
DiogenesCFG
Oct 26, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Jim Baggott begins this book with some philosophical questions, and raising ontological issues about what it actually means to be. Oddly, the book starts dealing with philosophers Plato (his idea of there being a world that's only the shadow of something outside) Descartes (and his idea that thinking must imply his existance, and from there, deriving the existance of a reality), and Kant (in his division of the noumenon, the things in themselves, and the phoenomenon, the perception of the observ ...more
Peter McLoughlin
Nov 30, 2020 rated it it was amazing
I reviewed this on my account that I deleted in panic. This book discusses the problem of the proper interpretation of Quantum mechanics. So it touches on metaphysics and epistemology. The author is a conservative from the days of the mid-twentieth century Copenhagen Interpretation (a paradoxical conservative in the sense of Zizek where being conservative is essentially like being a left-wing social democrat, not an accelerationist neoliberal.) The author takes a variety of views of the wavefunc ...more
Roo Phillips
Nov 04, 2020 rated it it was ok
Not a great overview of Quantum Mechanics. The author has an obvious chip on his shoulder from the get go, which taints his perspective. He has a confusing mix of high level explanations and very technical details (gave little thought of an audience). The chapters are extremely long and meander, so you can't remember where you started and what you've accomplished by the time you end one. The graphics look like they are from a 3rd grade copy of a copy of a homework assignment. His descriptions of ...more
Karl Nehring
Nov 30, 2020 rated it really liked it
Well written and interesting, but I must admit that at times I found my 71-yr-old brain unable to keep pace. My problem, not the author's.
John Rennie
Sep 18, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Jim Baggott has worked really hard at this book and I take my hat off to him. An immense amount of work must have been needed and I doubt I would have had the stamina for the task. He does an excellent job of discussing the issues involved.

The problem is that I cannot see who the target audience will be. A lot of the issues discussed are pretty technical and to anyone is unfamiliar with quantum mechanics the book will be impenetrable. There are numerous places where Baggott says "take my word fo
...more
Vincent
rated it really liked it
Sep 29, 2020
luli
rated it it was amazing
Oct 09, 2020
Aydin Sakar
rated it it was amazing
Jul 24, 2020
Wojcech Zbikowski
rated it really liked it
Sep 19, 2020
Julius Hrivnac
rated it really liked it
Sep 18, 2020
Gustav Matijek
rated it it was amazing
Sep 23, 2020
somethingness
rated it really liked it
Aug 20, 2020
Jacob Riley
rated it it was amazing
Sep 17, 2020
Diane A
rated it it was amazing
Aug 18, 2020
Carsten
rated it really liked it
Aug 11, 2020
Thomas Koetting
rated it really liked it
Nov 07, 2020
Fernando Fernandes
rated it it was amazing
Jul 15, 2020
Paul Vittay
rated it it was amazing
Aug 30, 2020
Esh
rated it really liked it
Aug 28, 2020
Michael Smith
rated it really liked it
Sep 18, 2020
Mustafa
rated it really liked it
Oct 17, 2020
Paul Pantea
rated it really liked it
Aug 22, 2020
Ng Xin Zhao
rated it it was amazing
Nov 03, 2020
Cindy
marked it as to-read
May 18, 2020
Emrys
marked it as to-read
Jun 27, 2020
John
marked it as to-read
Jun 29, 2020
Maciej Płonka
marked it as to-read
Jun 30, 2020
Glyn Normington
marked it as to-read
Jul 04, 2020
Liaudoz Kr
marked it as to-read
Jul 12, 2020
Galuh
marked it as to-read
Jul 12, 2020
Richard Guttenberg
marked it as to-read
Jul 12, 2020
Lukas Felix
marked it as to-read
Jul 12, 2020
Thomas
marked it as to-read
Jul 12, 2020
Shreenidhi
marked it as to-read
Jul 12, 2020
Anubhav Lamichhane
marked it as to-read
Jul 13, 2020
Evy
marked it as to-read
Jul 15, 2020
A Young Philosopher
marked it as to-read
Jul 16, 2020
Brian
marked it as to-read
Jul 17, 2020
Anubhav
is currently reading it
Jul 18, 2020
Laura
marked it as to-read
Jul 18, 2020
Alex
added it
Jul 23, 2020
Lin Ding
marked it as to-read
Jul 23, 2020
Julien
marked it as to-read
Jul 23, 2020
Gnossos Pappadopoulis
marked it as to-read
Jul 23, 2020
Laura
marked it as to-read
Jul 24, 2020
Frances Burrage
marked it as to-read
Jul 24, 2020
Tiago
marked it as to-read
Jul 25, 2020
Cissy
marked it as to-read
Jul 25, 2020
Millet
marked it as to-read
Jul 25, 2020
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • Einstein's Unfinished Revolution: The Search for What Lies Beyond the Quantum
  • The Stone Sky (The Broken Earth, #3)
  • The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking)
  • The Obelisk Gate (The Broken Earth, #2)
  • Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World
  • Quantum Entanglement
  • Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime
  • Cosmology's Century: An Inside History of Our Modern Understanding of the Universe
  • The System: Who Owns the Internet, and How It Owns Us
  • The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity
  • Piranesi
  • Reality is Not What it Seems: The Journey to Quantum Gravity
  • The Selfish Gene
  • What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics
  • Rage
  • The Mastermind: Drugs. Empire. Murder. Betrayal.
  • The Triumph of Christianity: How a Small Band of Outcasts Conquered an Empire
  • Antiquity
See similar books…
92 followers
Jim Baggott completed his doctorate in physical chemistry at the University of Oxford and his postgraduate research at Stanford University.

News & Interviews

“Let us remember: One book, one pen, one child, and one teacher can change the world.” That’s Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani human rights...
13 likes · 3 comments