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The Day of the Triffids (Triffids #1)

really liked it 4.0  ·  Rating details ·  67,349 Ratings  ·  2,477 Reviews
In 1951 John Wyndham published his novel The Day of the Triffids to moderate acclaim. Fifty-two years later, this horrifying story is a science fiction classic, touted by The Times (London) as having “all the reality of a vividly realized nightmare.”

Bill Masen, bandages over his wounded eyes, misses the most spectacular meteorite shower England has ever seen. Removing his
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Paperback, 228 pages
Published July 1st 2003 by Modern Library (first published 1951)
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Gary Fisher Can you cite specifics? I hadn't read the book since my school days but the Kindle edition flowed well and didn't have the inexplicable shifts usually…moreCan you cite specifics? I hadn't read the book since my school days but the Kindle edition flowed well and didn't have the inexplicable shifts usually found in abridgments. It would be a shame for readers to avoid this edition on the basis of unfounded speculation.(less)

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Nataliya
Mar 18, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2014-reads
Some books can be quite ill-served by their title. 'Not enough triffids!' would complain those lured to this book by the promise of a fun sci-fi romp centered around carnivorous sentient plants - just to find something entirely different.

But you gotta agree - a more appropriate title for this unexpected gem of a book such as "How complete disintegration of society and civilization as we know it, the sudden helplessness and the painful realization how little it takes to throw us off our tenuous
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Lyn
Dec 03, 2014 rated it liked it
Audrey II: Feed me!

Seymour: Does it have to be human?

Audrey II: Feed me!

Seymour: Does it have to be mine?

Audrey II: Feeeed me!

Seymour: Where am I supposed to get it?

Audrey II: [singing] Feed me, Seymour / Feed me all night long - That's right, boy! - You can do it! Feed me, Seymour / Feed me all night long / Ha ha ha ha ha! / Cause if you feed me, Seymour / I can grow up big and strong.

John Wyndham published his novel The Day of the Triffids in 1951 and it’s influence on speculative fiction sinc
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Carol.
Aug 19, 2011 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: fans of the apocalypse, classic sci-fi

A classic.

Sometimes classic is good.

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Sometimes classic is interesting.

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And sometimes, it's classic just because it was first, not best.

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For me, Triffids is a classic in the last sense, as one of the first novels in an era exploring the end of civilization. Colored by recent events of World War II, many writers in the 50s focused on nuclear holocaust. Wyndham went a slightly different direction, forseeing genetic manipulation and biological warfare. While his vision interested me, the didactic tone,
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Raeleen Lemay
This was so great! I have a lot of thoughts so I'll try to write up a review later.
Apatt
Aug 30, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: sci-fi, pre-80s-sf
“When a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere”

Not exactly up there with “It was the best of times etc.” but a great opening line I think. The Day of the Triffids is John Wyndham’s best known and most popular book by far. A case can be made for some of his other books being better, The Chrysalids and The Midwich Cuckoos for instance, but “Triffids” is the people’s choice, and having just reread it, decades after
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Lisa
For a person who claims not to like science fiction, I read and enjoy quite a lot of it! (In my professional life, I would now expect my students to rephrase their claim, as it is obviously not matching the evidence, but being stubborn, I stay firm!)

This is a thought-provoking novel, and it has not lost much of its message since its first publication. Humankind is still prone to self-destruction by carelessness and short-sightedness, and we still have diverse ways of dealing with and interpretin
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Dan Schwent
Feb 07, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: fans of survival horror and early sf
Shelves: early-sf
Everything seemed fine with the domesticated Triffids until the Earth passed through the tail of a comet, blinding much of the world's population. It was then the Triffids struck!

I love the proto-sf of the first half of the 20th century, when the lines between sf and horror were more blurred than they are now. Day of the Triffids is one of those books that many things that came later owe a debt to. The roots of the survival horror genre can be found within its pages, in my opinion. Many zombie f
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Richard Derus
Sep 17, 2012 rated it really liked it
This review can now be found at Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud!
Alex
Dec 21, 2014 rated it did not like it
Shelves: 2014, rth-lifetime
One of the reasons scifi gets a bad rap is that so much of it is so very shitty, and here's a prime example. There was a major strain of woman-hating, mansplaining, faux-intellectual, oft-Randian bullshit that sprang up in the latter 20th century, spearheaded by the idiot propaganda of Robert Heinlein and Ray Bradbury; this miserable 1951 book was a harbinger.

The setup is standard scifi: human overreaching leads to a holocaust. In this case the overreach takes the shape of mass blindness - like
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Megan Baxter
Aug 31, 2011 rated it really liked it
For some reason, I had the impression that Day of the Triffids was about the sudden attack of man-killing mobile plants. So I was surprised when it was revealed that the triffids had been around for a long time and a worldwide case of blindness was the cause of the catastrophe - the triffids merely took advantage of it.

Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.

In the meantime, you
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Penny
Sep 11, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
When I was about 14, I read my father's old Penguin classic copy -- a bright orange paperback from the 1950s. And absolutely loved it. I've read it countless times since, and is one of the books I think about most. Officially my favorite book.

Having said that -- it has no literary pretensions, most characters are fairly one dimensional, and the triffids themselves (walking, thinking, carnivorous plants) I have always thought of as a rather annoying distraction. What gripped me, and grips me sti
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Joe Valdez
Jan 17, 2014 rated it really liked it
The next stop in my end-of-the-world reading marathon was The Day of the Triffids, the 1951 man-versus-plants tale by John Wyndham. After an apocalyptic journey across the United States in The Stand and Swan Song, it was fascinating to read about how the U.K. might tackle doomsday and I have to say that the stoic and unruffled British response gave me hope for mankind's endurance.

With the first of several imaginative chapter titles (The End Begins) and cheeky wit, Wyndham introduces our narrato
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Lotte
4.5/5. // Have you ever been afraid of plants? No? Well, you will be after you've read this book.
Stephen
4.0 stars. I am very glad that I finally got around to reading this classic post-apocalyptic novel. I really liked Wyndham's writing style and the way he presented the story. It was well written, well plotted and kept me interested throughout the book. As with most really good post-apocalyptic science fiction novels, the true point of the story is the exploration of human nature by showing how different people act when the society they have grown up in falls apart. Recommended!!!
Algernon
May 07, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2013

I didn't plan ahead, but in a funny (or disturbing) coincidence, I've read this book on the fated day when the world ended, May 8 according to John Wyndham : When a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere. The opening chapter is one of the best in the genre, with protagonist Bill Masen waking up in a hospital and trying to understand what is wrong with the world around him without relying on his bandaged eyes. It
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Manny
Jan 09, 2010 rated it it was ok
Shelves: science-fiction
Stop me if you've heard this one before. It's a shame we don't have some ham. (You're supposed to say "Why?")

Well, because then if we had some eggs, we'd have ham and eggs! Gotcha.

The Day of the Triffids is rather similar. It's lucky that scientists haven't used bioengineering to create a deadly but slow-moving carnivorous plant. Because then if a mysterious comet caused everyone to go blind overnight, we'd all be sitting ducks!

It's not quite as bad as I'm making out. Admittedly, on a scale of s
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Jan-Maat
This 1951 novel was written when nuclear war and the potential end of civilisation as it was known was a more immediate concern than today. Early in the book there is an oblique reference to Lysenko and the Soviet Union - which helps to date it to that post war period. Truly Wyndham's concern is not with the potential end of civilisation itself, but really with what comes next.

Destruction then, whether by bomb or plant, isn't the point of this book. It becomes a device to get to the Robinson Cru
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Chris
I have a long fondness for Apocalyptic novels. The Stand was one of my early favorites from junior high school, and I really enjoyed its cousin by Robert McCammon, Swan Song. There's something about the End Of The World that just grabs me and won't let go. Maybe it's the thought that, should the world end, I would be one of the survivors. The rule of law would break down, all shackles of modern life would be loosed, and I would finally be free to choose my own destiny. Which, knowing me, would p ...more
Joseph
Jan 17, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: science-fiction
Reread or rather listened to the audio narration from Kindle Unlimited.

As a kid, I liked the movie. Needless to say, the book is better and much more detailed than the movie. Triffids, a mobile plant, have been around for a while. They are caged or anchored to spot and used as decoration. They also have a poison stinging whip that kills humans. One night, a green meteor shower lights up the sky and all that watch it are blind by morning. The great majority of the population is blinded. Only tho
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Mandy
Really enjoyed this post-apocalyptic tale which I wasn't expecting to like so much. It didn't really sound as dated as some other books of the time and was quite humorous in places. What a great opening line too!
Barry Cunningham
Apr 04, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I was 1 year old when this book was published so, understandably, didn't read it for a number of years after that, Think it was around 1958 when I first read it, even then it was groundbreaking, radio programmes, films wow what a concept. One of the very early novels that dealt with mass extinction of humankind and the consequences of survival. Science fiction was really still in its infancy in those days and authors like Jon Wyndham were laying the ground for the massive genre it became. In 195 ...more
Paul O'Neill
Sep 29, 2016 rated it really liked it
A book everyone should read. I love it when a story takes a jab at humanity and how balls up it generally is or can get.

A rather amusing, cleanly told story. Amongst the many, many, many (oh so many) crappy post apocalyptic books out there, this still has to be one of the best and most original. It has walking killer plants for goodness sakes!!

Read it, and you'll never look at your garden in the same way again...

Very cleanly written, short and interesting.
Jonfaith
Mar 21, 2014 rated it really liked it
Children have a different convention of the fearful until they have been taught the proper things to be shocked at.

Gauging our current run of apprehensions, one would be wise to explore this gem of the dystopian curve. The proliferation of hydrogen bombs and biological warfare certainly chilled the time of John Wyndham. The possibility in recent weeks of a thermonuclear exchange makes this novel all the more relevant today. Day of the Triffids is a meditation. There is no epic effort to capture
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Michael
Jul 30, 2012 rated it really liked it
Satisfying apocalyptic tale published in 1951. A mysterious massive meteor shower makes the vast majority of people on the planet blind, resulting in the collapse of civilization. The small population of sighted humans struggle with various strategies of survival and competition for resources. The disaster allows some unusual mobile carnivorous plants, widely nurtured because of valuable oils, to spread widely and threaten human extinction, the triffids. My memory of the book from my youth, dist ...more
Scarlet Cameo
Dec 12, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Lectura conjunta para el Hell-o-win con el grupo La cafetería de Audrey

"Los que poseen algún tesoro siempre llevan una existencia precaria"

"El día de los trifidos" se presenta como una obra como pocas, tras una serie meteoritos que dejan ciega a toda la población del mundo que disfrutó observándolos, aquellos que mantienen su capacidad visual deben buscar sobrevivir, lo cuál incluye aprender a realizar actividades básicas como cocinar u obtener agua, evitar ser sometidos por aquellas personas
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Maria
Apr 12, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Minunat este stilul lui John Wyndham...

Oamenii nu mai aveau realitate nici măcar în amintiri. Cu toții deveniseră o pagina îngălbenită a istoriei, ca auditoriul din Colosseumul Romei sau ca vasta armată asiriană.

Cum să nu îți atingă sufletul?

Lirică, profundă și emoționantă, Ziua Trifidelor a fost publicată la începutul anilor '50, într-o lume încă bântuită de ecourile macabre ale celui de al doilea război mondial și înspăimântată de perspectivele din ce în ce mai probabile ale unui conflict n
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Mark
Read this for the first time years ago, must have been when I was about 15 but suddenly thought I would post a few Wyndham reviews whilst eating my lunch cos he is a brilliant writer; although John Wyndham and a comfortably swallowed lunch probably are not the best of bedfellows. The story in some ways is of a skewed natural world in all its many guises rising up and seeking revenge. Whether it be, initially, the comet shower which most people go out to gaze upon and are then blinded by its affe ...more
Ryan
Jan 25, 2017 rated it liked it
The Good:
It was an interesting look at how the apocalypse and its fallout might've appeared to Brits shortly after WWII. I thought the atmosphere of loss and dread was conveyed very well, and the story was exciting and well paced.

The Bad:
It showed its age, as everything eventually does I guess. Most glaring for me were the characters - with the cynical, no nonsense hero and his ditzy female sidekick, it felt like an extended episode of Garth Marenghi's Darkplace.

'Friends' character the protagoni
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Bill
Jan 31, 2008 rated it it was ok
Shelves: science-fiction
The Day of the Triffids had such a great and promising start to it. A man wakes up in a hospital only to realize that he has been spared from a cataclysmic meteor shower that has left most of the remaining
population either dead or blind.
Somehow, this has something to do with the Triffids, a bizarre plant whose origins are a mystery. As the story progresses, more facts and history of the Triffids unfold to reveal sinister characteristics.

Unfortunately for me, my interest began to wane halfway thr
...more
Penny
I think this may be one of the most harrowing post-apocalypse stories I've read. (view spoiler)

That said, it was not difficult to read. The humour and tone of the narrator was fun and I had a great time running a
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« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
  • The Night of the Triffids
  • The Death of Grass
  • Non-Stop
  • When Worlds Collide (When Worlds Collide, #1)
  • The Drowned World
  • Rogue Moon
  • Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang
  • More Than Human
  • The Demolished Man
  • Mockingbird
  • Dying Inside
  • The Black Cloud
  • A Case of Conscience (After Such Knowledge, #4)
  • Make Room! Make Room!
  • Who Goes There? and Other Stories
  • Earth Abides
  • Sirius: A Fantasy of Love and Discord
  • Wasp
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John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris was the son of a barrister. After trying a number of careers, including farming, law, commercial art and advertising, he started writing short stories in 1925. After serving in the civil Service and the Army during the war, he went back to writing. Adopting the name John Wyndham, he started writing a form of science fiction that he called 'logical fantasy'. ...more
More about John Wyndham...

Other Books in the Series

Triffids (2 books)
  • The Night of the Triffids
“When a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere.” 148 likes
“It must be, I thought, one of the race's most persistent and comforting hallucinations to trust that "it can't happen here" -- that one's own time and place is beyond cataclysm.” 108 likes
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