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Franny and Zooey

3.97  ·  Rating details ·  194,984 ratings  ·  7,276 reviews
‘Everything everybody does is so—I don’t know—not wrong, or even mean, or even stupid necessarily. But just so tiny and meaningless and—sad-making. And the worst part is, if you go bohemian or something crazy like that, you’re conforming just as much only in a different way.’

First published in The New Yorker as two sequential stories, ‘Franny’ and ‘Zooey’ offer a dual port
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Paperback, 201 pages
Published January 30th 2001 by Back Bay Books (first published 1955)
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Margie Taylor I loved Catcher in the Rye, and love Franny and Zooey even more, reading it again so many years later. But honestly, if you hated Holden, you'll hate …moreI loved Catcher in the Rye, and love Franny and Zooey even more, reading it again so many years later. But honestly, if you hated Holden, you'll hate these two. Give it a pass :)(less)
Melanie "Franny and Zooey" was published by Little, Brown in 1961, while "Franny" appeared by itself in the New Yorker in January 1955 and "Zooey" appeared by…more"Franny and Zooey" was published by Little, Brown in 1961, while "Franny" appeared by itself in the New Yorker in January 1955 and "Zooey" appeared by itself in the New Yorker in May 1957.(less)
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Community Reviews

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Average rating 3.97  · 
Rating details
 ·  194,984 ratings  ·  7,276 reviews


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s.penkevich
Feb 09, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Everyone
Recommended to s.penkevich by: Poems between books on shelves
I'm sick of not having the courage to be an absolute nobody.

The blinking cursor that preceded this review, the place-holder of possibility before the big bang of creation, speaks volumes when taken in relation to J.D. Salinger’s exquisite Franny and Zooey. In a novel about identity, about forging who we are from a blank slate in the void of society and humanity, we are constantly called to the floor and reminded how often we impose our ego, or wishes, our desires, and become a caricature of ours
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Lee
May 30, 2007 rated it it was amazing
I am a huge JD Salinger fan, and I'm one of those people who's read "Catcher in the Rye" like 200 times, several times a year since I was about twelve. I buy into every cliche said about it: it changed my life, it made me want to write, it validated my own teen angst, Salinger captures teen-speak amazingly well, Holden Caulfield is vulnerable and wise, a kid-hero, etc. I have such an emotional attachment to the book that I find it hard to tolerate much criticism of it. Case in point: I recently ...more
Jason
Sep 04, 2007 rated it it was ok
Recommends it for: no one
If you liked Catcher in the Rye more than your average novel, then you probably have considered reading Franny and Zooey. It's one of very few books that J.D. Salinger wrote because he kind of turned into a weird old recluse. I was really excited about reading this. I expected big things. Needless to say, I was very disappointed.
Problem number one: Zooey, who is essentially the "protagonist" (or one of two main characters) is pretty much identical to the main character from Catcher in the Rye, H
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Kenny McCool
fight

“I’m just sick of ego, ego, ego. My own and everybody else’s. I’m sick of everybody that wants to get somewhere, do something distinguished and all, be somebody interesting. It’s disgusting.”

This was my first exposure to Salinger. I’ve made attempts in the past to read Catcher in the Rye, but I was never able to connect with it. My friend Spenky raved about Salinger’s “Franny and Zooey,” so I decided this would be my introduction to Salinger. To say I was enthralled with Salinger’s writ
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Ben
This is great; it really is. In many ways it’s the anti Cornwell-Patterson-Grisham-King-Coben-Brown. Franny and Zooey isn’t fast paced or plot driven; it isn’t thrilling (in the traditional sense), and its concepts aren’t surfaced-based or easy to come by (or even embraced by the mainstream populace), but Salinger didn’t write for these people; he wrote for himself and if you identified with what he wrote, good for you -- if not, so be it. Even so, it’s not flourishy or fancy; there’s nothing pr ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
(445 From 1001 Books) - Franny And Zooey, J.D. Salinger

Franny and Zooey is a book by American author J. D. Salinger which comprises his short story "Franny" and novella Zooey. The two works were published together as a book in 1961, having originally appeared in The New Yorker in 1955 and 1957 respectively. The book focuses on siblings Franny and Zooey, the two youngest members of the Glass family, which was a frequent focus of Salinger's writings.

عنوانها: «فرانی و زویی»؛ «فرنی و زویی»؛ «فرنی و
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emma
me typically: :/
me after i think about the glass family: :)
me giving you the link to this full review on my blog: https://emmareadstoomuch.wordpress.co...

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I loved this book so much I couldn’t figure out what to do with myself for several hours after reading it.

Logically, it seems that maybe shorter books would be harder to love. You spend less time with the characters, the narrative complexity must be limited, you live in the world for a minimal amount of time.

But for the past few years
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Dave Schaafsma
So, this semester I am teaching a course on postwar American novels. I am basically a former high school English teacher who became an English educator (preparing people to become English teachers themselves), and only relatively recently have been asked to teach “straight” lit courses at my university as I usually have taught methods (of teaching) classes (though also YA and Graphic Novels) in the past quarter century. I just turned 61, and have not read many of these novels for this course for ...more
Henry Avila
Mar 25, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is in actuality two short stories combined by the enigmatic writer to form a novel and even together not very long at that.. The opening looks rather ordinary a boy waits for his girl at a train station ( set in the 1950's) in an unnamed city in the eastern U.S., as the unpleasant cold, winter weather freezes the college student's bones. Lane Coutell is ambitious, happy, wants to make a splash in the world just the opposite of his girlfriend, Franny ( Frances) Glass of the brilliant yet tro ...more
·Karen·
Aug 11, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: mttbr-2012
"Well you are stupid Mum, you are one of the most stupid people I know, really what were you thinking when you decided to even read this for God's sake." Lights another cigarette. "I mean to say, for God's sake, it's full of this kind of histrionic dialogue with incessant overuse of italics, and the people in it don't so much speak as hold forth as if they were on the stage somewhere for God's sake, and they just go on and on about Jesus and chakras and anahata and all this goddam mystical stuff ...more
Fergus
Dec 08, 2020 rated it it was amazing
I read this marvellous book in the winter of 1973-74 and it marked for me a moment at which my adult intelligence was crystallized. The product was a plodding, alienated way of thinking that marked me with a modern label: a keenly sensitive existentialist.

Oh, not so sensitive as I’ve become, many, many books of life stories later.

I was still a chrysalis that hadn’t yet broken open into the world’s stark terror. Like Franny. A child of Pax Americana. Alone and isolated and struggling to come to t
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Jason
Nov 04, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Did you know that Zooey Glass was voted People magazine’s Sexiest Man Alive in 1961?

What? No, I’m kidding. Why would you have ever believed that? Did you think the magazine even existed back in ’61? Geez.

But if it did, fictional or not, Zooey could almost certainly have been a contender. And back then he would have been eligible, too. Of course, you wouldn’t get the Zooey Glass looks without a little of the Zooey Glass attitude, and are you sure you’d want to have dealt with that? It was a littl
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Michael Finocchiaro
Jan 29, 2017 rated it really liked it
Most people of my generation read JD Salinger's A Catcher in the Rye back in high school, were amused by it's vulgarity and forthrightness and then forgot about it. I personally haven't reread it since. Instead, for this online Yale class on US lit since 1945, I read Franny and Zooey as it is on the syllabus. It is an interesting diptych. The shorter first part has Franny Glass meeting her boyfriend Lane at Yale and going to eat before a football game (Yale-Harvard perhaps.) The boyfriend reread ...more
Nataliya
Aug 14, 2020 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Nataliya by: James
Shelves: 2020-reads
I have no idea what life would be like if I were an emotionally edgy genius. Apparently the children of the Glass family, Salinger’s favorite creation, would have made a quick work out of me. You see, obviously I’m very average, the mediocrity that Franny Glass is appalled by and yet pretends - even to herself - to envy. These young people, apparently, are very much not average or mediocre.
“I’m sick of not having the courage to be an absolute nobody. I’m sick of myself and everybody else tha
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Mariel
Nov 29, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: and she gave away the secrets of her past
Recommended to Mariel by: and she expressed herself in many different ways
I'll tell you one thing, Franny. One thing I know. And don't get upset. It isn't anything bad. But if it's the religious life you want, you ought to know right now that you're missing out on every single goddam religious action that's going on around this house. You don't even have sense enough to drink when somebody brings you a cup of consecrated chicken soup- which is the only kind of chicken soup Bessie ever brings to anybody around this madhouse. So you just tell me, just tell me, buddy. E
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David
Jul 02, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: everyone on the planet
Shelves: top-20
I swore to myself that I would write a review of this book before the end of 2010, so here goes. I should issue a warning - I'm totally stoked up on hot Jameson toddies due to this nasty cold that took over my body on Monday (recipe: ample whiskey, cloves, lemons and suagar, all of which you mash together - and this is important - BEFORE you add the hot water; then guzzle as the situation demands). But then, it was unlikely that I would ever be able to review this - one of my top 3 books of all ...more
Seth T.
Jul 30, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: bookclub
I am the luckiest person in the world. The last few months have led me through an unbroken string of good books. I have had so much fun reading that I'm just in love with books right now.

And isn't that the way it should be?

In any case, Salinger's Franny and Zooey is the most recent in what I hope will be a continuing tradition of engaging, well-written stories. I have to admit I approached the work with some skepticism, having been wholly uninterested in Catcher in the Rye when it was forced up
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Carmen
Lane was speaking now as someone does who has been monopolizing conversation for a good quarter of an hour or so and who believes he has just hit a stride where his voice can do absolutely no wrong.

Oh-kay. Let's break this down.

Salinger is a brilliant writer. And the first part of this two-part book is absolute perfection.

The section called "Franny" is amazing. It's about 20 percent of the book. It's a wonderful and to-the-point story about a college "girl" who becomes increasingly fed up with t
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Barry Pierce
Ugh I love Salinger. It's a crime that he left behind just a handful of work. This collection contains a short story (Franny) and a novella (Zooey). Both deal with typical Salingerian problems (death, grief, "what is the true meaning of life" and whatnot) and he handles them really well. His writing is nothing short of superb and flawless. I do feel that Zooey went on for a bit too long however. Spending that much time with Salinger's characters can be a bit trying (hence the universal hate of H ...more
Marchpane
Dec 23, 2018 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 19-20-19
Sorry Salinger fans but I really did not enjoy this one.

I guess Salinger intended this book to be like a Platonic dialogue, full of profound wisdom. But instead of Franny being hectored by Zooey, reading this felt like I was being hectored by the author. The whole story is contrived, the characters are irritating & supercilious, Zooey’s ‘advice’ is condescending and actually, just terrible advice. Which would be fine if that was the point, but it felt like Salinger wants us to love Zooey, think
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Steve
May 09, 2012 rated it really liked it
Something my Uncle Bob once told me about his days as a competitive bridge player always stuck with me. He said the further he got into it, and the more advanced the players were, the less fun it all became. I guess at some level it got to be a serious business – one where everyone wanted to show that they were as smart as or smarter than all the other laser-focused competitors. Any social element of the game was beside the point, or worse still, a distraction. J.D. Salinger’s idée fixe for many ...more
Cheri

’I used to believe we were just like those trees
We'd grow just as tall and as proud as we pleased
With our feet on the ground and our arms in the breeze
Under a sheltering sky’

‘Twirl me about, and twirl me around
Let me grow dizzy and fall to the ground
And when I look up at you looking down
Say it was only a dream’

-- Only a Dream -- Mary Chapin Carpenter

I’ve had this book on my to-read list for years, so long now that I can’t remember when I put it on there, only that my son recommended that I read
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Matthew Ted
61st book of 2019.

When I read this last year, I remember thinking I wanted to be Franny's lover. In fact, I have a very distinct memory of lying on my back and reading as my now ex-girlfriend was blow-drying her hair. We were in Cornwall; the window was open, and outside one could see St Ives' houses stretching and curling around the lick of beach, which by this time, was quiet. The sun was low, but not set. The light was golden and sleepy in a way, with the premonition of dusk. On my back there
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 ~Geektastic~
I just don’t know how I feel about Franny and Zooey. I really don’t. I read it a couple of weeks ago and couldn’t write anything about it, as I couldn’t decide if I loved it, just liked it or absolutely hated it. I can rule out hating it I suppose, as I finished it and I never finish books that I truly despise. And I don’t think I loved it. I’m pretty sure I didn’t. My overall reaction, by process of elimination, is a general ambivalence. Part of my issue here is the damn star rating. Two makes ...more
Annelies
What a magnificent book. To make a book out of a conversation between brother and sister, and making it interesting and profound, is masterful. The conversation is actually about between being religious or not, they call it the Jesus-prayer. Then a discussion starts about between living for it or not. Here I stop my review. Because it's so compact a telling the risk is there about spoilers. ...more
Megha
Aug 05, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: reviews
Yesterday was the day of Rakshabandhan, an Indian festival celebrating the relationship between brothers and sisters, and I spent this day a few thousand miles away from my siblings. Last night I spent 2 hours at the dinner table talking to my roommate about those years when I used to celebrate Rakshabandhan at home with my sister and brother, about the years when we were growing up together. After yesterday's somewhat long dinner, I picked up Franny and Zooey from the page where I had left it t ...more
Francisco
Mar 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing
I think I lost count of the number of times I've read this little book. The first time more than forty years and then periodically every few years. I'm sixty-two-years-old today and I just realized that there will come a time when all I will want to do is re-read the books that have impacted me in some way or another. There's not much time, you know. This is a religious book written at a time much like our own when writing a book with religious themes was a risky endeavor. The author risked bein ...more
Ellen
Nov 09, 2009 rated it liked it
Shelves: novels, young-adult
description
Edited to include visual: "Disaffected Young Adult," which is a picture of MFSO, used with his permission, with the following explanation (in his words): "I refer to it [the picture:] as 'Too Much Fun' and that it's from the end of my first year in college in the summer of 2004 while in the midst of three days with no sleep or food and a lot of chemicals."

* * *

As a former Salinger aficionado, I wanted to look back and consider how I felt about Salinger now.

In Salinger’s two-part novel, Franny an
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Romie
It’s us. We’re freaks, that’s all. We’re the Tattooed Lady, and we’re never going to have a minute’s peace, the rest of our lives, till everybody else is tattooed, too.

Franny and Zooey are both outsiders, they think one way when the rest of the world thinks another, they don’t fit. And they never will.
They’re trying to find a way to live in this selfish world, a world they just cannot stand because it goes against everything they believe in.

Franny absolutely despises the world she lives in : the
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Antoinette
Imagine you are born into a super intelligent family. So smart, in fact, that all the kids used to be on a show called “It’s a Wise Child”. For Franny and Zooey, it has become a curse. They both have problems listening to others expound on their ideas and opinions, without disagreeing and cutting them down.

“I’m just sick of ego, ego, ego. My own and everybody else’s. I’m sick of everybody that wants to get somewhere, do something distinguished and all, be somebody interesting. It’s disgusting.”

T
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Jerome David Salinger was an American author, best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye, as well as his reclusive nature. His last original published work was in 1965; he gave his last interview in 1980. Raised in Manhattan, Salinger began writing short stories while in secondary school, and published several stories in the early 1940s before serving in World War II. In 1948 he publishe ...more

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