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Uncanny Magazine Issue 30: Disabled People Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue

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4.05  ·  Rating details ·  91 ratings  ·  33 reviews
The September/October 2019 Disabled People Destroy Fantasy special issue of Hugo Award-winning Uncanny Magazine.

Featuring new fiction by Sarah Gailey, Lane Waldman, Jei D. Marcade, Tochi Onyebuchi, Karlo Yeager Rodríguez, and Aysha U. Farah. Essays by Kari Maaren, Gwendolyn Paradice, Day Al-Mohamed, A.T. Greenblatt, Cara Liebowitz and Dominik Parisien, poetry by Roxanna Be
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Kindle Edition, 148 pages
Published September 3rd 2019 by Uncanny Magazine
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Average rating 4.05  · 
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 ·  91 ratings  ·  33 reviews


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Start your review of Uncanny Magazine Issue 30: Disabled People Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue
Nataliya
Jul 19, 2020 rated it it was ok
This review is for Hugo-nominated novelette Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey:
“I try to stay still for as long as I can. I try to swallow down the feeling of numbness. I know better than to hope, but I hope anyway—maybe today will be the day I get to keep that feeling. Maybe today will be the day nothing hurts.“

In a nutshell, it’s about a shapeshifter Suss, a young woman suffering from disabling chronic pain from which she can escape by changing into the wolf form. But when she’s a wolf,
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Silvana
Rating and review only for Sarah Gailey's "Away with the Wolves" novelette, currently being nominated for the Hugos.

I listened to this via Uncanny spotify account, which is an alternative way to enjoy their stories. The narrator was really good, she brought the story to life. It's rather fascinating, the way the author related lycanthrophy with disability. The main character turned into a wolf regularly, while although her village tolerated her (as long as she paid the damage she caused) and she
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Paul
2.5 for the whole fiction side of the issue.

Stories in this issue:
Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey - 3
Tower by Lane Waldman - 2
Seed and Cinder by Jei D. Marcade - 1
The Fifth Day by Tochi Onyebuchi - 1
This is Not My Adventure by Karlo Yeager Rodriguez - 2.5
The Tailor and the Beast by Aysha U. Farah - 4

I really liked The Tailor and the Beast by Aysha U. Farah. It is a story about the father of a woman who is taken by the Beast in a castle. The father ends up trading his life at the castle for
...more
Felicia
Feb 26, 2020 marked it as comics-and-magazines
Favorites:
Away with the Wolves (Sarah Gailey)
Tower (Lane Waldman)
This Is Not My Adventure (Karlo Yeager Rodríguez)

Favorite essays:
Sudden and Marvelous Invention: Hearing Impairment & Fabulist (non)Fiction (Gwendolyn Paradice)
The Blind Prince Reimagined: Disability in Fairy Tales (Kari Maaren)
Part of That World: Finding Disabled Mermaids in the Works of Seanan McGuire (Cara Liebowitz)
David H.
Oct 16, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: fantasy, magazine
This special issue's got 6 original stories, 6 poems, 6 essays, and 2 interviews (and a Hugo acceptance speech!).

This issue was a followup to last year's Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction! special issue, though without the "double-issue" bonus, so it's a normal length issue aside from some extra poems and essays.

"This Is Not My Adventure" by Karlo Yeager Rodríguez (a revisited portal fantasy) and "Away With the Wolves" by Sarah Gailey (a person disabled in human form, but not their wolf fo
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Andy
Jun 04, 2020 rated it liked it
Shelves: 2020, hugos-2020
I've only read 'Away with the Wolves' by Sarah Gailey, as I'm voting in the Hugos this year and it's nominated for best novelette.

Gailey has crafted an interesting take on the werewolf tale, in the context of someone suffering chronic pain and the release they experience with the change. Contrasting the psychologically exhausting, cumulative and unrelenting impact of chronic pain with the differing ways acute pain is experienced and can be tolerated, potentially even enjoyed (if you go so far),
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Amanda
Hugo 2020 Nominations (Best Novelette);

"Away with the Wolves"

I am pleased to have learned on looking up the issue of this Uncanny, that it was entirely devoted to Sci-Fi/Fantasy Stories about (and by) differently-abled people. This story was an interesting one, but not as compelling as I wished it was.

This was the story of a disabled girl, whose body often caused her too much pain to function in the space of each single day after rising, but who has the ability to shift into the from of a wolf
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Margaret
Favorites from this collection:

"Away with the Wolves" by Sarah Gailey, about a woman who has chronic pain, except when she transforms as a wolf. But as a wolf, she tends to wreak havoc on the village. Can she manage to find a way to continue to live in the village? Should she try to repress her wolfish self?

"The Tailor and the Beast" by Aysha U. Farah: A queer retelling of "Beauty and the Beast." I loved that the father stays to save his daughter.

"Sudden and Marvelous Invention: Hearing Impairme
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A.J.
Jun 27, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: hugos-2020
Read for the 2020 Hugos
Story: Away with the Wolves

Note: I listened to the audio version of this story that's on the Uncanny Magazine Podcast. The reader was excellent. Highly recommended.

So, about the story itself. It's a simple, but really good one. What would you do if you lived in chronic pain, but had a chance to get away from that, with conditions? How far would you go to live with those conditions? Can you find a balance? Those are the questions that this story asks. Obviously, the answers
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saradevil
Jan 11, 2020 rated it really liked it
Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey - The first, and probably my favorite stores in this issue.

Tower by Lane Waldman - An interesting narrative.

Seed and Cinder by Jei D. Marcade - I both liked and disliked this, however, it did haunt me long enough for me to feel it worthwhile.

The Tailor and the Beast by Aysha U. Farah - Not my favorite.

This Is Not My Adventure by Karlo Yeager Rodríguez - I found it difficult to connect with this story.

The Fifth Day by Tochi Onyebuchi - Again, I just had a
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Melissa
3-4 stars overall with several items of 5 star quality. "Away With the Wolves" by Sarah Gailey is deservedly nominated for Hugo for Best Novelette. Also of very high quality are the stories "Seed and Cinder" by Jei M. Markade and "The Tailor and the Beast" by Aysha U. Farah and the essay "Part of that World: Finding Disabled Mermaids in the Works of Seanan McGuire" by Cara Liebowitz. I read this for my 2020 Reading Challenge (Read Harder "literary magazine") and the 2020 Hugo nominations (Best N ...more
Pete Aldin
Jan 10, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Superb. Everything in this collection is good and carries emotional depth. Standouts for me among great stories, poems and essays: This Is Not My Adventure, Tower, Away with the Wolves (I love interesting shapeshifter tales; The Visions that Take their Toll (an essay every fantasy writer must read); “The Thing In Us We Fear Just Wants Our Love”

Anything that makes me pause my reading to think, and then stays with me, was well worth the time and money. Five stars!
Shannon (That's So Poe)
Nov 10, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2020-books
I enjoyed a bunch of the stories and essays in this collection! I particularly liked "Tower" by Lane Waldman and the interview with her, as well as the poems "‘Eating Disorder’ does not begin to describe it" by R. B. Lemberg and "goddess in forced repose" by Tamara Jerée, both of which were filled with a lot of power and anger. I wish this collection had been a bit longer like the Science Fiction (issue #24) one so that it could have explored more voices, though. ...more
MollyK
Apr 22, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: read-in-2020
“Away With the Wolves” by Sarah Gailey - 5 stars
“Tower” by Lane Waldman - 3 stars
“Seed and Cinder” by Jei D. Marcade - 4 stars
“The Fifth Day” by Tochi Onyebuchi - 3.5 stars
“This Is Not My Adventure” by Karlo Yeager Rodríguez - 3.5 stars
“The Tailor and the Beast” by Aysha U. Farah -5 stars
Rebecca Crunden
These covers are always so beautiful. <3

I started with 'Monsters & Women—Beneath Contempt' by Roxanna Bennett.

Dismiss reversal of promises & missing curatives,
who notices holes in the old narrative


Read it here.
...more
Flinx
May 30, 2020 rated it liked it
If one doesn’t want to live disabled/with chronic pain, one can change their life altogether, eventually paying the price. This story tells me in a sweet, naive manner that the price is worth paying and that one can have the best out of all worlds. Obviously fantastical.
Lisa Feld
Jul 23, 2020 rated it really liked it
This is a review of Sarah Gailey’s “Away with the Wolves.” I’m a big fan of the “traditional werewolves had reasons they thought transforming was a good thing” trope, and having a protagonist with a chronic illness, which is something I usually don’t see in high fantasy, makes it even better.
FrauMiest
Dec 23, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Even more than the stories (the tailor and the beast is marvellous) did I love the articles.

That's what I want to read, more of it, much more.
...more
Cynthia Joy
Mar 01, 2020 rated it really liked it
Highly Recommended
Titus Fortner
I only read (listened to the podcast of) Sarah Gailey's _ Away with the Wolves_
Interesting take on werewolves and disability.
...more
Paul Morisset
Jun 21, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: shorts
Rating for ‘Away With the Wolves’ by Sarah Gailey.
Kristīne Vītola
Aug 21, 2020 rated it liked it
Shelves: sff, shorts-to-read
Read:
Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey
Sarah Jean
Sep 06, 2020 rated it really liked it
I especially liked Gailey’s story and the essays in this book.
Jess
May 23, 2020 rated it really liked it
I really enjoyed this and loved the way Gailey used a form of lycanthropy as a lens through which to explore living with chronic pain. Their writing was lovely in this novelette – I love that traditional fantasy town feel, it’s a very comforting setting for us fantasy lovers – and that the main love that appears in this story was platonic was so satisfying.
Marco
May 11, 2020 rated it really liked it
This review is for Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey.
Every year I read all the finalists of the most prestigious science fiction awards (at least in the English speaking world): the Hugo awards. This story is a finalist in the Novelette category.
I have previously read and loved some other stories by this author, and I was looking forward reading this. I was not disappointed.
This is the story of Suss, a lycanthrope / werewolf. She lives in a town, where everybody knows about her shape-shifting
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Else
Sep 29, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Content list - my rating

FICTION
✓🔊 Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey ★★★★ (see review below)
✓ Tower by Lane Waldman ★★★★ (Rapunzel re-imagined)
Seed and Cinder by Jei D. Marcade
The Tailor and the Beast by Aysha U. Farah
This Is Not My Adventure by Karlo Yeager Rodríguez
✓🔊The Fifth Day by Tochi Onyebuchi ★★★★ (Great story, too heavy & surreal for me, I highly recommend the interview with the author on the podcast!)

POETRY
Monsters & Women—Beneath Contempt by Roxanna Bennett
Cavitation by Toby MacNut
...more
Cristina
May 25, 2020 rated it it was ok
“Away with the Wolves” (2020) Optimistic but somehow repetitive, clumsily written and naive.
Norman Cook
Apr 30, 2020 rated it really liked it
Read online at Uncanny Magazine: Disabled People Destroy Fantasy Special Issue, September/October 2019.
This novelette is a werewolf story about finding your true self. Considering that it is published in the Disabled People Destroy Fantasy Special Issue, I read into it as an allegory about how disabled people might feel, although in this case it seems that for the protagonist the disabled state is being in her human form. As such, the ending seems a little bit like wish fulfillment, which is not
...more
bee
Sep 08, 2019 rated it really liked it
Fiction
Away With the Wolves by Sarah Gailey: 4.5/5
Tower by Lane Waldman: 3.5/5
Seed and Cinder by Jei D. Marcade: 4/5
The Fifth Day by Tochi Onyebuchi: 2.75/5
This Is Not My Adventure by Karlo Yeager Rodriguez: 5/5 (REALLY good, my favourite of the issue)
The Tailor and the Beast by Aysha U. Farah: 4/5

Non-fiction
The Blind Prince Reimagined: Disability in Fairy Tales by Kari Maaren: 3.75/5
Sudden and Marvelous Invention: Hearing Impairment and Fabulist (non)Fiction by Gwendolyn Paradice: 5/5 (
...more
Krista McCracken
Sep 20, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Favourites from this issue:

"Away With the Wolves" by Sarah Gailey (Fiction)
"The Tailor and the Beast" by Aysha U. Farah (Fiction)

"Building the Door, Hold the Door: Protecting the Citadel of Diverse Speculative Fiction" by Nicolette Barischoff (non-fiction)
"Fears and Dragons and the Thoughts of a Disabled Writer" by Day Al-Mohamed (non-fiction)
"Part of That World: Finding Disabled Mermaids in the Works of seanan McGuire" by Cara Liebowitz (non-fiction)

"The Thing In Us We Fear Just Wants Ou
...more
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In my day job, I am the Head of the Rare Books and Manuscript Library and Juanita J. and Robert E. Simpson Rare Book and Manuscript Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, one of the largest public university rare book collections in the country. I used to manage pop culture special collections that include the papers of over 70 SF/F authors at Northern Illinois University. I ...more

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