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Four Black Revolutionary Plays: Experimental Death Unit 1, A Black Mass, Madheart, and Great Goodness of Life
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Four Black Revolutionary Plays: Experimental Death Unit 1, A Black Mass, Madheart, and Great Goodness of Life

3.38  ·  Rating details ·  39 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
The sum total of three hundred years of contained fury, these four plays are powerful statements about the real meaning of white oppression of black people. in their militancy and anger, they perfectly express the mood and frustrations of black America.
Paperback, 105 pages
Published July 1st 2000 by Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd (first published 1969)
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Desiree
Jul 11, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone who's interested in the history of racism.
My first thought upon starting to read this book was that the writing is awful and that has absolutely nothing to do with the subject matter and may just be because the author, LeRoi Jones, wasn't as experienced as he could've been before publishing his work. Of course, this book was released in the late 60s so that in and of itself is an accomplishment against the expectations of the time, especially considering the subject matter. However, back to the poor writing, I feel like that coupled wit ...more
Ben
Dec 26, 2012 rated it it was ok
The social issues addressed are important and these plays were written and staged in the 1960s, a time of massive social change. I've read a bit of Amiri Baraka's poetry and "The Dutchman and the Slave" (which is a far better play than any of those contained in this collection). These plays came across as reactionary, and the writing somewhat sophomoric and 1960s-psychedelic, seeming to reduce all sorts of black social problems to issues of race (and more precisely racism by whites). Baraka/Jone ...more
Rubayya
Feb 04, 2012 rated it it was ok
Only read A Black Mass. It was radical and disturbing, but I believe it was meant to be so.
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Baraka was born Everett LeRoy Jones in Newark, New Jersey, where he attended Barringer High School. His father, Coyt Leverette Jones, worked as a postal supervisor and lift operator. His mother, Anna Lois (née Russ), was a social worker. In 1967 he adopted the African name Imamu Amear Baraka, which he later changed to Amiri Baraka.

The Universities where he studied were Rutgers, Columbia, and Howar
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More about Amiri Baraka...