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Blooding, The

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3.92  ·  Rating details ·  1,307 Ratings  ·  94 Reviews
Fifteen-year-old Lynda Mann's savagely raped and strangled body is found along a shady footpath near the English village of Narborough.  Though a massive 150-man dragnet is launched, the case remains unsolved.  Three years later the killer strikes again, raping and strangling teenager Dawn Ashforth only a stone's throw from where Lynda was so brutally murdered.  But it wil ...more
Paperback, 428 pages
Published March 1st 1995 by Bantam (first published 1989)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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Deanne
Jul 31, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone who likes true crime
Shelves: true-crime
In 1986 when Dawn Ashworth was murdered I was 13. I remember the case because at the time I was living in Leicester, and often went to Enderby.
The university of Leicester was less than a mile away, and DNA testing was big news as was the blooding.
It's also important that DNA testing cleared the first suspect before being used to prove the real killer guilty.
The book goes into the details of both murders, describes the hunt for the killer and the lengths the Leicestershire constabulary went to t
...more
Lisa
Mar 21, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I just finished reading this for my genetics book club. Great true-crime. Suspenseful and gripping. It's the story of a serial rapist-murderer in a small town in England who is eventually caught using the then-new technique of DNA fingerprinting. A quick read -- great airplane book! Hard to find.
Jim
Jan 02, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: crime, non-fiction
As far as I am concerned, this was Wambaugh's best true crime account. Perhaps because it is based in England, I could relate to the streets of Nottingham more than to the streets of LA, and Wambaugh's writing carries the story without prejudice. Never flinching from the darker sides of life, the book follows the progress of solving a murder case through the then groundbreaking use of DNA fingerprinting. I'm always wary of writing review cliches like "A true classic of crime literature", but, I ...more
Jill Hutchinson
Jun 04, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: true-crime
Wambaugh tackles his first book set outside of the US and selects the groundbreaking case which revolutionized how crime was detected......the use of DNA to identify the perpetrator.

In two small, close knit contiguous villages in England the rape and murder of two teenage girls throws the population into panic. Violent death was something that was foreign in these towns beyond the occasional pub or domestic fights which resulted in the unintentional death of one of the participants. The police b
...more
Gram
Aug 11, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Despite knowing the outcome of the 1980's investigation into the murder of two teenage girls, Joseph Wambaugh manages to maintain tension in this true crime story.
As he details the huge police search and DNA screening, which resulted in the 1st ever criminal conviction by means of DNA "fingerprinting", he weaves in the thoughts and words of 2 of the police's main suspects in a chilling way.

And he does it all in less than 300 pages (crime fiction and true crime writers, please note!). I read th
...more
Gerald Kinro
Mar 18, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A body of a fifteen-year-old who was raped and strangled is found along a foot path near the English village of Narborough. This launches a massive effort by law enforcement officials with no results. Three years later it is déjà vu as another teenaged girl’s body, also raped and strangled is found near the same location as the first. But it will take four years, a scientific breakthrough, and an effort by 4000 crime fighters to solve the murders.

The story is riveting, as Wambaugh uses techniqu
...more
Shelley
Apr 06, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was recommended to me by a Criminal Justice Professor. It's the true story of the very first case solved with DNA. Two unsolved murders occurred just as the technology was being perfected at a nearby University in the Middle Villages area of England. Wambaugh has an insider's understanding of the challenges of a murder investigation---he's retired LAPD. I was very humored by the fact that lots of the men were afraid to give blood, not because they were guilty but because they were needle sh ...more
Mari Stroud
Dec 11, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Wambaugh recreates the layers and idiosyncrasies of a small town in North England as well as he does Los Angeles. If you like his other works, you'll like this one for its possession of much the same strengths: fantastic grasp of character and voice, exhaustive research, and odd moments of absurdist humor.
Juli
Dec 19, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book offered 2 different insights into murder cases - 1) the evolution of DNA testing and how it came to be used to identify or eliminate suspects and 2) how different murder investigations are outside of the U.S. - there is no way that a mass "blooding" would have been allowed (the ACLU or some other group would have stepped in to stop it).
Ram
Jan 22, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: true-crime
a true crime narrative by joseph wambaugh - murders set in small village in rural england - wambaugh has built the suspense very well, in the middle, i thought the narrative was sagging, but nice fast paced thriller - my first one by wambaugh
Stacy
Jan 06, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another awesome book if you are into detective/crime fiction and non fiction.
Liz Thomson
Mar 03, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Excellent true story of the Narborough Village where there were the murders were first solved by DNA testsing. Well written and very interesting!
Naomi Blackburn
Sep 06, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fantastic book about the first use of DNA testing in the solving of two brutal rapes and murders in an English village.
Barb
Nov 04, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I literally could not put down this book. If I hadn't started reading it so late at night it would have been one sitting instead of two.
Mary Waters
Jul 05, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A great read if you can get around the British vernacular.
Robert Banfelder
Excellent window into the mind of a serial killer.
Karl Jorgenson
Jun 18, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Early Wambaugh, non-fiction. The story of a serial killer in England where the case is solved by the new DNA matching, just invented. Wambaugh does fantastic research and couples it with fine writing. Every character comes alive and the scenes are as vivid as though you were there. The drawback, to all non-fiction, is that things take time and don't always proceed with tension and drama. Wambaugh's greatest strength may be that he can take an enormous amount of tedious detail and pare it down to ...more
Chris Bartholomew
May 24, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A true story of serial murders in a small English village. One of the first times genetic testing is used to solve a crime. Joseph Wambaugh is a great story teller.
Michael Sova
Some months ago, while giving the television remote a workout, I suddenly found myself engrossed in an episode of Modern Marvels on the history channel. The show is very well done. Sit down for an hour and you can learn about everything from fried food, to the fishing industry, to freight trains. The episode in question happened to be on forensic science, a topic I have a very general knowledge of but had never really thought about. Once upon a time, crime detection boiled down to whether or no ...more
Laurie
Apr 08, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Genetic fingerprinting takes centre stage for the first time ever! The Blooding takes you on the development of DNA in forensic investigation in real time. A savage rapist and murderer is stealing teenage girls in the UK. With painstaking investigations underway and seemingly producing no results, a scientist maps out DNA for the first time. While it was originally used in a limited capacity for paternity suits, it became the tool for tracking a sociopathic killer, who believed in science enough ...more
Clare O'Beara
This is the true story of the first widespread use of blood samples for genetic fingerprinting in a murder case.

The English villages involved were shocked by the rape and death of two young women and the police went all-out to find the killer. A new technique called genetic fingerprinting was available and a decision was made to trial this by asking every man of a certain age group to come forward and give a blood sample. This would be matched against evidence found at the scenes.

I found this
...more
Glen Stott
Jan 23, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history
Back in the '70s I was a Wambaugh fan; “The New Centurions,” “The Onion Fields,” etc. drew me in. The story for “The Blooding” has more promise than the previous books, but it failed to deliver the quality I was expecting. It’s the story of a serial killer being chased by a seriously flawed but totally dedicated policemen. The investigation covered a period of roughly seven years. Thousands of clues were followed to dead ends before the big breaks came – primarily the development and use of DNA ...more
Lorrie
Oct 03, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Love Love Wambaugh's books. The reason it took me awhile to read this book is that I only read it on the recumbent bike or in the bathtub. An extraordinary true crime story....For the first time, Joseph Wambaugh turns his attention outside the United States to deal with two murder in neighboring English Midlnds villages. The victims of the terrifying rape murders two fifteen year old girls who do not know each other have in commmon fatal mistake they choose to walk the foot path.
The murders occ
...more
Nancy Day

Interesting, kept my attention. The story about how a little village in England introduced forensic DNA testing. Not Wambaugh's best book. It was written nearly two decades ago, and my hunch is that now cringes at his tactless comments. Example: He "humorously" describes the cops having fun telling men that "the good news is you're not the killer, the bad news is that you have AIDS." Ha ha. His more contemporary books strike me as extremely humane and broad-minded. Thank goodness we all evolve.
Janis Gilbert
Fifteen-year-old Lynda Mann's savagely raped and strangled body is found along a shady footpath near the English village of Narborough. Though a massive 150-man dragnet is launched, the case remains unsolved. Three years later the killer strikes again, raping and strangling teenager Dawn Ashforth only a stone's throw from where Lynda was so brutally murdered. But it will take four years, a scientific breakthrough, the largest manhunt in British crime annals, and the blooding of more than four th ...more
Amber
Jan 15, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I was initially interested in this book because I saw a forensics show based on the book's true story. It follows the search for a killer of young women in small village England in the 1980's and the birth of DNA fingerprinting being used in criminal cases. Too much graphic detail about the crimes and too little scientific detail. It could have been so much more interesting had the author elaborated on the science of forensics. By failing to do do, it cheapened the story of the 2 murdered girls ...more
Sjb59
Jul 26, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fascinating to read this having just read Paul Britton's 'The Jigsaw Man' and seeing the same crime represented by psychologist and then from the police perspective. Coming from Leicester I remember these murders and the fear of the whole city at that time. Also, working down the corridor from Alec Jeffreys for the last 16 years, I thought I had to read it. It is easy to forget how far we have come as a result of his discovery.

The only thing I found strange as a Leicestrian was the American narr
...more
Amanda
Jan 13, 2015 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Not nearly as dull as I was expecting for non-fiction. The author manages to keep the mystery in the story while still giving the facts of the investigation. It would have been nice to have more information or focus on the DNA fingerprinting rather than having it as a murder mystery with some few details about it on the side. I am interested in reading more of the author's books since his non-fiction was good.
Jim Thomas
Oct 02, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-2014
I used to read all of this author's work but seemed to forget about him. I was looking for a good true crime book and so I went to look at the Edgar winners for true crime books and this was one that grabbed my attention. It's the true story of the very first murder where DNA was used to find and convict the killer. Wambaugh is up to the task of making this more interesting than just fact finding. I enjoyed it
Emily
Oct 13, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was a very good book. It was interesting to read about how DNA came to be used in solving crimes and about the mass blooding that occured. Both were unprecedented techniques used in crime solving. I had to read this book for a Forensic Science class and I am so glad I did. It was also interesting to see how things were different in crime solving in Britain than in the US. I would have thought that mass bloodings would never have happened in the US but I learned that they have!
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Joseph Wambaugh, a former LAPD detective sergeant (1960-1974), is the bestselling author of twenty-one prior works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Choirboys and The Onion Field. Wambaugh joined the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) in 1960. He served 14 years, rising to detective sergeant. He also attended California State University, Los Angeles, where he earned Bachelor of Arts and M ...more
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