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Tomorrow And Tomorrow And Tomorrow

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3.86  ·  Rating details ·  28 ratings  ·  9 reviews
M. Barnard Eldershaw was the pseudonym used by the twentieth century Australian literary collaborators Marjorie Barnard (1897-1987) and Flora Eldershaw (1897-1956).

Their final collaborative novel, Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow, published in 1947 as Tomorrow and Tomorrow, is considered to be one of Australia's major early science fiction novels and was highly regarded
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Paperback, 1st uncensored ed., 456 pages
Published 1983 by Virago Press (first published July 11th 1947)
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Average rating 3.86  · 
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Lisa
Oh, dear, it feels disloyal to The Sisterhood and the feminist Virago publishing project to say this, but Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow is a really dreary book. I'm not surprised that the censored (1947) edition wasn't popular with the reading public, and now, having read the uncensored (1983) version, I'm inclined to think that the rejection of this novel had little to do with the censor's scissors. There are two reasons why I persisted with it: I wanted to contribute to Bill's AWW Gen 3 W ...more
Luke
Sep 14, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I can't say that I've ever been too aware of Australian sci-fi, which is more my failing than that of the genre. But I'd heard Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow spoken of in reverential tones, a kind of feminist, socialist meditation on war, peace and politics, conveyed through an historical novel told within a science-fiction framework. And I must admit, I was intrigued.

Then I read that Patrick White thought the book was pretty good, and that made me even more interested, as I couldn't really
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Oanh
Well, this took me forever to read. It was excellent but extremely heavy going and quite depressing. I had to put it down, frequently, and be in the mood for reading it, too.

So, a rendering of Sydney/Australia (but mostly Sydney) of the 1930s and 1940s as told from the perspective of someone living in a socialist utopia (that is possibly a distopia but this is not a distopic sci-fi/speculative fiction). At the end of WW2, instead of a reversion to society as we know it, there is instead an anarc
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Julian Leatherdale
Oct 02, 2017 rated it really liked it
I have been looking forward to reading this book for some time as it comes with a reputation as an undeservedly overlooked Australian classic. The boldness of its conception is breathtaking with the character of a novelist in a 24thC technocratic socialist utopian Australia writing a novel about the struggles of the Common Man in 20thC Australia. And so we have a political sci-fi novel wrapped around what now reads as an historical fiction novel about the hard times and political consciousness o ...more
Ms_prue
Jul 10, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
So, yes, it took me more than a month to get 144 pages and then I marathoned the remainder in less than 48 hours - there was a lot of setup in those first 144 pages, and my Very Attentive reading arrangement for Maximum Note-taking was a bit limiting on time. But the pre-reading I inadvertently did (Come in Spinner, Jean Devanny, Exiles At Home) was very good prep for being able to get straight to the big ideas without getting confused and bemused by the references and their significance. I was ...more
Sammy
Oct 21, 2019 rated it really liked it
I would love to give this 5 stars, but I'm trying to resist that urge these days. The book is flawed, dated, and occasionally a battering ram of ideas, so I'll stick to 4. But other reviewers here have said everything, and I'm mighty sleepy. So all I will say is the concerns of Barnard and Eldershaw (two classic leftie intellectual writers in an era of heavy right-left combat) remain with us. Questions about capitalism and materialism, about the unwanted influence of the USA on Australia, and al ...more
Viola
Sep 19, 2020 rated it liked it
1947 book of "Australian visionary literature": Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow by M. Barnard Eldershaw (the pseudonym of literary collaborators Marjorie Barnard and Florence Eldershaw).

Science fiction vision set in the 24th century and features Knarf (a novelist and historian whose name is an inversion of Frank Dalby Davison's first name).

The book is essentially a story-within-a-story, with much of it comprising an historical novel, written by the character Knarf, about "old" Australia fro
...more
David
Sep 02, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Anne Platts
Jan 25, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I may re-read this book as part of the 2018 challenge
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M. Barnard Eldershaw was a pseudonym for the Australian writers Marjorie Barnard (1897 - 1987) and Flora Eldershaw (1897 - 1956), who collaborated on numerous novels, short stories, and essays on Australian fiction.

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