Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present (Stories and Studies in World History)” as Want to Read:
The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present (Stories and Studies in World History)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The World That Trade Created: Society, Culture, and the World Economy, 1400 to the Present (Stories and Studies in World History)

3.71  ·  Rating details ·  301 Ratings  ·  35 Reviews
Why are railroad tracks separated by the same four feet, eight inches as ancient Roman roads? How did 19th-century Europeans turn mountains of bird excrement from Peru into mountains of gold? Where has most of the world's oil come from in the 20th century? This new edition of "The World That Trade Created" reveals the answers to dozens of tantalizing questions like these. ...more
Hardcover, 287 pages
Published October 31st 2005 by M.E. Sharpe (first published December 1st 1999)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The World That Trade Created, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The World That Trade Created

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Gavin
Jul 29, 2010 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
If you love economics and hate long-winded books with irrelevant graphs, this is the book for you. It's call-of-nature length sections are quick and easy to digest while imparting important tidbits about the history of trade. Moreover, the book does an excellent job of illuminating the impact of commodities on world trade and a countries development. It is historically accurate, well written, and entertaining.

One caveat: If you have a low tolerance for the constant reiteration of the fact that
...more
Emily Logue
This book was literally the bane of my existence in high school. The message is undoubtedly important, but its delivery is dry and unappealing. The book is filled with long winded stories that lead to a point that could have just as easily been expressed in a few short sentences. This book as taught me that as important as your message may be, you still have to make in sound interesting to get your audiences’ attention.
Cory
Oct 24, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I love this book because it's all essays. You can pick it up and read one section at a time to get a mini history lesson.
Adam
Aug 28, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very dense book, but fascinating. Wish it went into more detail on a lot of the topics.
Mike DeClue
Jan 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This might be the best required reading I've ever went through in high school, I don't recall if it was economics or history class, but I had to write a paper on it and I was absolutely blown away at the intricate web of connections that trade has through the different continents around the Atlantic.

There probably isn't a more extreme example of cultural shifts on trade than the Japanese ending their self
imposed exile of the world thanks to a rather intimidating navy knocking at their door, but
...more
Nightkid
  閱讀時間足足跨越了二十二天,歷時之長,對我來說,也算是創紀錄的了。
  雖然坊間對此書評價甚高,但是,我卻讀得不甚暢快,經常一天才看完三、四十頁。或者,又是我期望過高吧。
  《貿易打造的世界》的內容描寫得不夠深入,絕對是未能吸引我的主因。
  每一節只有短短兩、三頁,若是對歷史不了解的讀者來說,已綽綽有餘;但從我這種歷史系畢業生的眼光來看,未免太簡單……
  綜觀全書,幾乎從開始到結束,都看到作者對石油、鴉片、甘蔗在碎碎唸……第一次、第二次還可以接受,但幾乎每章都有幾節與此相關,未免太喋喋不休了。
  內容的高度重覆,實在令我難以一氣呵成看畢全書。
Huan
Aug 19, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Somewhat dry at points, but the fact that the book is presented in the form of a progression of essays mitigates that.

It gave me a lot more perspective on why some things are the way they are now, and why things might change and how, in the future; a key point I learned, that now seems obvious in retrospect, is that sometimes, systems and institutions weren't constructed in a logical way just to exist, as it might seem, they emerged to serve specific goals (usually profit) and gained enough pow
...more
Robert Morris
Mar 04, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Loved it. Fantastic book. This sat on my shelf for years because of its dull academic trade dress. When I finally took it down last month I was first pleasantly surprised, then fascinated, and then sad to come to the end.

The book is made up of three to four page sections dedicated to the history of a particular commodity or trade route. I think the book originated as separate articles in a trade publication, but it's actually a good way to address the topic. Themes of exploitation and the impor
...more
Lauren Hakimi
Jun 21, 2015 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I guess this is what happens when you try to stuff 600+ years of history into a 300-page book: It becomes a string of irrelevant and incoherent details with minimal commentary. For a 300-page book, the author should've focused on big ideas, as opposed to a bunch of small, un-insightful ideas in two-age chapters. The opening paragraph to each chapter was corny. The puns at first were cute but then it got to the point where it was unprofessional. Another thing, the author probably used the word 'u ...more
Lorraine Herbon
Feb 19, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book is a little treasure hidden under a pile of economy history! Originally a series of essays written for a magazine on world history, Kenneth Pomeranz and Steven Topik, along with their other contributors, have taken a dry subject and made it interesting and accessible for the average reader. You can learn all about interesting characters, from the familiar (Marco Polo and Christopher Columbus) to the only-slightly-less-famous (Stamford Raffles, John Sutter, and Claus Spreckles). The cha ...more
Colin MacDonald
Really interesting, but kinda hard to digest. It's a collection of short essays, grouped loosely by topic. Each one is quick overview of a topic, so the whole is very high-density. It covers many aspects of global trade and events over a 500-year span, and without a strong organizing structure it's hard to fit it all together. Lots of good insights, anecdotes, and historical tidbits. Definitely a good starting point if you're browsing for topics to explore in depth. I'll probably keep coming bac ...more
Two-fisted History
Jan 01, 2014 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: No one
Recommended to Two-fisted by: Professor
The best thing I can say about this book was that there were some interesting stories about the development of trade the use of goods we still use today.

In the end the author's rampant revisionist tendencies and blatant anti-Western bias proved too much for me and left a decidedly sour taste. I feel that this is the least accurate historical 'non-fiction' book that I have read. It was the first book I ever wrote in, and it was solely to express my distaste with the author.
Lauren
Aug 31, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The cultural and societal aspects are what drew me to this book, being ever curious of how past lives have been lived. It's dense, to be sure, I struggled to be caught by the intro all the way to the first essay, but once getting into the laborious flow of the writing it was definitely rewarding. A book I would call an essential intro for dipping your toes into the waters of trade history linked to societal evolutions.
Georgene
Mar 12, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history
This book covers the events that lead to the discovery of the Americas and the impact this had on the economies of the entire world. A sweeping statement, but accurate. I had no idea of what events lead Europeans to sail off into unknown seas in the hopes of reaching the Far East.

Based on a multitude of magazine articles, this book explores the events preceding the discovery of the New World and how that impacted and changed how the world was.

Very interesting read.
Kevin Lawrence
Nov 05, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the type of book that I wish would just keep going and going -- I wish Pomeranz and Topik had a blog and could sustain looking at commodities and their relationship to social/political/cultural history. These little essays make history and economics enjoyable for the common reader without sacrificing any historiographical rigor. A book I'm always pushing on people, especially social studies teacher friends!
Brendan Sweeney
Nov 28, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-history
The book had some interesting historical stories involving the development of trade and common goods we still use today (the history of coffee and chocolate was fascinating). Overall, however, the author's rabid revisionism towards history and blatant anti-Western bias made the work difficult to muddle through.
Sovatha
Nov 08, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very insightful book to read on how the global trade has affected the world as it is today. By insightful, I mean how some small trivial phenomena happening somewhere in the world that you had never heard of could change something that forever affects how things work at the global scale. If you want to read about economics but don't like number, this is a good book for you.
T.J.
Jul 29, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A bit dry and slightly academic, this will have enough information for the new grad student or the occasional history buff. The telling of world history on an economic level without sticking straight to orderly chronology may be distressing for some, but it's a pretty decent, strong analysis.

A bit soporific in the middle, but otherwise a great read on world history.
Zachary Moore
Jul 29, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Intersting histroy of trade told in easy to digest vignettes. Isn't as deep as it might be and some of the vignettes are too short to give you much besides a word picture, but still an informative read if you are interested in the formation of the modern world economy.
Penny Jenkins
this book was said to be hard to understand by my 15 year old and along with some of her friends. They now need to write a review on the book about the society, culture and the economy. Can we get some help for you out there? Please
Larspeart
Jun 03, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Perhaps my favorite book of Economic history, delightfully given to me by a former colleague. Told in a series of short essays, this book wonderfully explains human nature through the lens of, well- humans.
David R.
Aug 04, 2009 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Quite possibly the worst book I read in the last five years. The author is plainly bitter about the way our economic history turned out and manufactures one venomous screed after another. I didn't even bother with the last 25% of the book.
Robby
Jul 12, 2016 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Terrible book in my opinion so boring
Grace
Honestly, a pretty good way to frame the study of world history through trade. I especially liked the chapter on drug commodities.
Josh Brett
Oct 05, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Uncle John's Big Bathroom Reader of post-colonialist global economic history.
Renee Blackmon
May 22, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Pick a commodity from chocolate to cocaine. Nicely organized for reading what interests the reader most.
Jessica
Jul 23, 2013 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
YES OMG I'M DONE. A few pages of this book was really good and interesting. The rest was just bleh. Wanted to vomit while reading this.
Jessy
Aug 27, 2012 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Awfully dry and dull but I guess I did learn a bit from it. Maybe I would have liked it more had it been voluntary reading and not required to squeeze out an essay from .__.
Ruth
Apr 13, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I had to read this book for my AP World class and I found it to be really interesting. It is obviously informative, but it's not horribly long and dry like some other historical books are.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
summaries 1 57 Aug 29, 2009 01:08PM  
  • A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World from Prehistory to Today
  • An Empire of Wealth: The Epic History of American Economic Power
  • The Search for Order, 1877-1920
  • The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America, 1815-1846
  • ReORIENT: Global Economy in the Asian Age
  • A Monarchy Transformed: Britain, 1603-1714
  • The Thieves' Opera
  • The American Future: A History
  • Obscene in the Extreme: The Burning and Banning of John Steinbeck's the Grapes of Wrath
  • The Human Web: A Bird's-Eye View of World History
  • Turkey: A Short History
  • The Pursuit of Glory: Europe 1648-1815 (Penguin History of Europe)
  • Before European Hegemony: The World System AD 1250-1350
  • The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century
  • Irresistible Empire: America's Advance Through Twentieth-Century Europe
  • Identity Economics: How Our Identities Shape Our Work, Wages, and Well-Being
  • New Worlds, Lost Worlds: The Rule of the Tudors, 1485-1603
  • The Modern World-System I: Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of the European World-Economy in the Sixteenth Century

Share This Book