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The Angel and the Assassin: The Tiny Brain Cell That Changed the Course of Medicine

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4.33  ·  Rating details ·  3 ratings  ·  1 review
A thrilling story of scientific detective work and medical potential that illuminates the newly understood role of microglia--an elusive type of brain cell that is vitally relevant to our everyday lives.

"The rarest of books: a combination of page-turning discovery and remarkably readable science journalism."--Mark Hyman, MD, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Food:
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Hardcover, 320 pages
Expected publication: January 21st 2020 by Ballantine Books
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Ashlee Bree
Dec 04, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: tbr-2019, science
My first thoughts: Illuminating. Startling. Objectively informative. Emotionally and psychologically resonant. Broad conceptually yet personal in context. Explanatory on the whole without crossing the line into yawn-inducing drudgery that slaps research statistic after research statistic, or fact after scientific fact, to the forehead in the hopes that details about microglia will be absorbed into the brain via osmosis then fired from synapse to synapse until it embeds itself there: read but not ...more
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Award-winning journalist and internationally-recognized speaker Donna Jackson Nakazawa began writing at twelve years old, after her father passed away unexpectedly. Recording her thoughts and feelings in a journal helped her to make sense of a world without him. When she came to the last page of her diary, she wrote, “I think I’m going to be a writer.”

Later, in college, she joined the staff of
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