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Among the Wild Young
 
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Natalka Burian
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Among the Wild Young

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liked it 3.00  ·  Rating details ·  136 ratings  ·  53 reviews
Cofounder of The Freya Project and author of YA book WELCOME TO THE SLIPSTREAM Natalka Burian's AMONG THE WILD YOUNG, which follows two foster siblings the summer they discover the true nature of a mysterious plant called the vine, which their family harvests and that offers prophetical powers—and unexpected dangers—to all the girls in their foster home as they grow closer ...more
Published by Park Row Books (first published September 22nd 2020)
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liked it Average rating 3.00  · 
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BookNightOwl
Dec 07, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Daughters of the wild deal with some tough tough subjects. Subjects such as child abuse, drugs, regular abuse and more. I listened to the audio book of this book and I thoroughly enjoyed this story. I was interested it kept me wanting to listen and find out what was going to happen next. I suggest that if you have a tough time reading about these issues this book is not for you but if you can see pass that and read a book that deals with something different get a go.
Melissa Fish
Jun 23, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Couldn’t finish. This author abuses adjectives in a way that makes me think she’s got a Pinterest board for them instead of an actual thesaurus. When she described a girl walking away “with meticulous speed” I just recognized that I couldn’t and shouldn’t carry on. Also there’s a boy named Cello in the story, and I’ll bet twenty dollars there’s a horrifically corny story about why he was so named. No thanks.
Jerrie (redwritinghood)
There is a lot of dark stuff in this one - child abuse, marrying off underage girls, drug addiction, etc. But the premise of the story centers around a mysterious vine with some kind of vague powers and there are rituals and . . . The plot gets a little lost somewhere in there.
Cindy
I received an advanced readers copy of this book from the publisher via net galley

This book did not live up to its blurb. I was expecting magic, instead I got a story about abused foster kids being used for farm labor, with the background of something magical. This book made me feel dirty and depressed.

First, the use of "foster" kids. We know they aren't fosters--they are payments to the family from leaches who want the medicine that Mama Joseph hawks. They are brought up in what can only be sq
...more
Courtney Maum
Apr 28, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Transporting-- a story that twists inside of you and takes root just like the psychoactive plant at this novel's fascinating heart. Reads like a Lauren Groff novel with the magic of Marie-Helene Bertino. ...more
Kari
Sep 25, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
My Review of
DAUGHTERS OF THE WILD
By Natalia Burian
Published by Park Row Books
******
The book cover was beautiful, the synopsis drew me in and I knew I had to read this. It had so much promise and the story was sad and I was quickly mesmerized until...a vine; which is the epicenter of the story, is being treated like a God. Children are abused, used as slaves and a baby goes missing and it seems of no importance. Things really don’t seem to make sense. There is an attempt of a boy coming out who t
...more
Cari
Jul 31, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I loved this book!! Look for my review in Booklist.
Donna Hines
Jul 27, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: arc, netgalley
A bunch of fosters kids tend to a vine of heaven while also being subjected to sexual abuse and neglect and drug abuse.
With this noted, I'm not sure what to think because I couldn't really get into this type of mystical, fantasy, cult format, with numerous religious beliefs that were too overwhelming for my taste.
The whole idea centers upon rituals the girls perform to make the vine grow.
It's a bit odd, strangely bizarre, and too far out.
Thank you to Natalka, the pub, NetGalley, and Amazon Kindl
...more
Petite Draig
I can't quite tell if they were supposed to be working an opiate farm - which was kind of what I felt it was, if opiates looked like aloe vera, which they probably don't but anyway - I enjoyed this, except it lost something towards the end.

I loved the communion with the vine thing, though the whole women-only aspect of a lot of these types of books is not my favorite thing - imagine if someone did it the other way around all the time, which yeah, they did for years but how good is it for storyte
...more
Dotty
Oct 14, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
This is one of the weirdest books I’ve ever read. I was intrigued by the premise, but I honestly don’t know what was going through the mind of this author. I read it all the way through, thinking it would get better. It didn’t and I wish I hadn’t finished it. It left me feeling kind of dirty...
Kristin Gore
Sep 18, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Thank you to Park Row Books for the ARC.

I was really looking forward to reading this book as it’s not my usual genre but I just couldn’t get into it. Part of my problem was that none of the characters were like able. I kept hoping things would change as I got further into the book but it just didn’t get better for me.
Irka Zazulak
Sep 15, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is a wonderful book. I couldn't put it down until I finished it and now I really hope the author will write a sequel so that we can find out what happened to all the other beautifully portrayed and interesting characters. Absolutely loved this book! ...more
Radicalmandy
Aug 14, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Gripping and beautifully written. I couldn’t put it down.
Telia
Aug 07, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was a powerful and well written book. I was captured all the way through. It twists and turns unpredictably and has many layers. Loved it!
Telia
Aug 05, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Different from what I normally read but interesting all the way through.
Kaz
Jul 20, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
n the right hands, this could have been a wonderful story of the situational dangers that come with foster care, bad foster families and the good that can be found there. With the right editor the words choice could have been clipped a bit, a book with a great plot could have maybe been cultivated a bit better? However, despite the realistic abuse the book was difficult to follow. Not because, as one might assume, the violence, hurt and deeply felt emotions left you lacking- no those were all ve ...more
The LitBuzz
I wanted to love this book because it sounded magical and empowering of women.
The idea for this story was solid but not executed as well as it could have been. It’s implied to be about a magical vine that relies on women for it’s growth. We don’t understand early on what that means of the women tasked with the vine’s upkeep, and after finishing the book it’s still not very clear to me. After a young woman has her cycle, her responsibility to the vine changes with rituals. The ritual is not as de
...more
Rhiannon Johnson
I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.



From the summaries I read and the comparisons of this book to The Power and The Bell Jar, I assumed this story would be full of magic and female power. Instead, I read a bizarre book about a cult/religion using "foster" kids for farm labor and so much abuse (physical, drug, sexual, emotional). I didn't simply quit the book because it kept my attention and I thought I would surely get some answers to the vaguely a
...more
Sarah
Dec 04, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Natalka Burian starts with an interesting underlying plot: a magic (or possibly alien?) vine is tended by a group of foster children for the benefit of the Joseph family in the mountains of West Virginia. The vine is imbued with magical properties and must be harvested under the direction of a woman with a connection to the vine. The children harvest the plant ceaselessly for the tyrannical Joseph family who then process and sell the vine. However, Burian fails to deliver on almost every interes ...more
Michelle
Sep 21, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
This was not at all what I was expecting. The blurb leads you to believe it will be filled with magic and instead, you are given a dark and depressing book full of child abuse, neglect, and an unsettling incestuous attraction. I felt more depressed the longer I read it and was left horrified and disturbed by the amount of horror those children faced.

Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this title. All opinions are my own.
Melissa Acquaviva
Jan 06, 2021 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Daughters of the Wild is an intriguing , complicated and fantastic story which centers around a mysterious vine that grows in the wild countryside of West Virginia. The vine is discovered in the 1800’s by a young girl after what appears to be a meteor landing. The story centers around what occurs with the girls descendants and their obsessive care of the vine in the 1990s. The family has cultivated and grown the vine all these years and found it to have narcotic like potency. They have built a b ...more
Janet
When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I AM BORED!!) ANd it is too hot to go outside, so why not sit in from of the blasting a/c and read and review books??

I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGal
...more
Kristin
Sep 21, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I was provide an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

I wanted to love this book because it sounded magical and empowering of women.

The idea for this story was solid but not executed as well as it could have been. It’s implied to be about a magical vine that relies on women for it’s growth. We don’t understand early on what that means of the women tasked with the vine’s upkeep, and after finishing the book it’s still not very clear to me. After a young woman has her cycle, her responsibility to
...more
Rosie (readingrosiee)
Daughters of the Wild by Natalka Burian
⭐️⭐️ *

*1.5 stars rounded up

I received an ARC of this book via Net Galley and Harlequin Trade Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

Joanie, Cello, Marcela and other foster kids live on a farm in West Virginia. They help cultivate, tend, and harvest the “Vine of Heaven.” They live in a rundown trailer next to their foster parents, Letta and Sil. Joanie and Cello are the oldest and most knowledgeable when it comes to tending the Vine. Each trained by
...more
Erica
Jun 19, 2020 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, fantasy
2.5 stars rounding up. I received an ARC of this novel via Net Galley and Harlequin Trade Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

In rural West Virginia, Joanie, Cello, and the other foster children live out of a dilapidated trailer where each day they work the fields tending a mysterious and magical plant known as the Vine of Heaven. Only the older girls, who have reached puberty, can cultivate the plant. Using rituals the girls bond with the vine and are able to understand it's needs in o
...more
Kathleen Gray
Sep 19, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is dark, sad, and definitely not for everyone. Primarly told in the third person by Cello, it's the story of his foster sister Joanie, her missing baby, the Vine, and the horrible conditions in which a group of five fosters live. It's set on a farm in rural West Virginia where a valuable vine grows and is tended by the children, whose fingers are small enough to pull weeds, and older girls who can nurture it once they menstruate. Joanie was sold off to her foster aunt (a heinous person) to ...more
Judy Beetem
Oct 20, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Daughters of the Wild is a dark, magical story about a group of foster children living on a farm in the backwoods of West Virginia. The children are forced to work on a farm, but girls who have reached puberty are taught to cultivate the mysterious Vine of Heaven. They bond with the plant who tells them what it needs. Joanie, one of the older fosters, is forced into an arranged marriage and soon becomes pregnant. When the marriage goes terribly wrong, she turns to fellow foster and best friend, ...more
Katelynne
This book really pulled me in and I found myself thinking about it when I was away from it and wanting to know what happened next. While I really enjoyed the characters, especially Joanie and Cello whose POVs we see through, this book didn’t live up to my expectations. Some of the negative reviews I see seem to involve a misunderstanding of magical realism, and that’s not where my problem is. Rather, I expected the ending to be empowering for the characters, and while it felt realistic, it was k ...more
WeLoveBigBooksAndWeCannotLie
Do you have a green thumb?🌱
I have always killed plants, inside or outside, I am terrible with all plants. The Daughters of the Wild was not what I expected in at all, however, these girls are good with plants! I was a little disturbed to find out this book was about a strange and abusive foster home that forced the children to cultivate a worshipped plant called the Vine.🌿
The story was well written but I have never enjoyed reading about cruelty or abuse, this type of book is hard for me to read
...more
Jess
Aug 26, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I received this for free on goodreads.

I read about 25% of it and could not get into the story. There was too much tell not show for my taste. The foster children grew up cultivating a plant and experienced abuse. It's a horrible upbringing and situation and I couldn't find any redeeming qualities in following the characters on this journey. I'm not interested in this kind of story despite the magical elements of the Vine.
...more
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