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Dune

(Dune #1)

4.22  ·  Rating details ·  649,149 ratings  ·  17,910 reviews
A deluxe hardcover edition of Frank Herbert's epic masterpiece--a triumph of the imagination and one of the bestselling science fiction novels of all time.

This deluxe hardcover edition of Dune includes:
- An iconic new cover
- Stained edges and fully illustrated endpapers
- A beautifully designed poster on the interior of the jacket

- A redesigned world map of Dune
- An
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Hardcover, Deluxe Edition, 688 pages
Published October 1st 2019 by Ace Books (first published June 1st 1965)
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Popular Answered Questions
Nasos Delveroudis - (warning, wall of text incoming)

Short answer: No, it's not necessary to read the rest of the series. Dune can be treated as a standalone book and…more
- (warning, wall of text incoming)

Short answer: No, it's not necessary to read the rest of the series. Dune can be treated as a standalone book and story.

But why would you want to do that? You'll miss most of the fun, as some of the subsequent books are arguably better (especially God Emperor of Dune which, in my opinion, is probably the best and deepest sci-fi work of all time by far). Moreover the saga of Dune by no means ends with that #1 book, as only in the second volume there are huge plot twists and the story develops drastically taking a whole new turn (quite unexpected too).

Long answer: The Dune saga practically consists of two parts. The first six books were written by Frank Herbert in the period between 1965 and 1985. These are::

1) Dune (1965)
2) Dune Messiah (1969)
3) Children of Dune (1976)
4) God Emperor of Dune (1981) (like I said, arguably the best book of its genre)
5) Heretics of Dune (1984)
6) Chapterhouse: Dune (1985)

One may read them in this exact order, as they're not only sorted by publishing date but it's also how the epic unfolds in chronological order. Unfortunately Frank left his work unfinished and the story incomplete, because he passed away before he had the chance to finish the seventh book.

But his legacy lived on and it was his son Brian Herbert who resumed the Dune series, in collaboration with Kevin Anderson (widely known for contributing to the Star Wars universe by writing lots of original stories, especially "The Jedi Academy Trilogy").

Not only that but just after they'd started writing the first few books of the "modern" Dune era, they discovered long lost and forgotten material by late Frank, sealed for 15 odd years in a bank locker. It turned out these notes were actually rough guidelines about the legendary Dune 7, the missing part of the saga, the one which would complete the series, which no one had expected to see.

Brian and Kevin have released 12 books so far (but we should be expecting more to come), which I'll cite below. They are separated by thematic context, which is required as most have been written in trilogy form and need to be read in this particular order:

--- Prelude to Dune series (it's about a period beginning about 35 years before the events of the original Dune and ending about 15 years before them):

1. House Atreides (1999)
2. House Harkonnen (2000)
3. House Corrino (2001)

--- Legends of Dune series (refers to the old galaxy-wide war between humankind and machines, about 10 thousand years before Dune, when the foundations of the saga were actually built):

4. The Butlerian Jihad (2002)
5. The Machine Crusade (2003)
6. The Battle of Corrin (2004)

- Dune 7 (as a matter of fact it's an untitled series but it's practically Dune 7, split in two parts and it obviously resumes the story from where Frank Herbert left it in distant 1985):

7. Hunters of Dune (2006)
8. Sandworms of Dune (2007)

--- Heroes of Dune series (it's about a period starting around 15 years before Dune until its very beginning):

9. Paul of Dune (2008)
10. The Winds of Dune (2009)

--- Great Schools of Dune series (OK, I'll have to admit I haven't read these two yet, so I haven't got the slightest idea what they're about! Hopefully I'll find out soon enough)

11. Sisterhood of Dune (2012)
12. Mentats of Dune (2014)

The emerging question is in which order does one have to read all these books (the usual and everlasting dilemma of non-linear/multi-volume series such as the Lord of the Rings/Hobbit/Silmarillion, Ender's Saga etc). Do we have to follow the order in which they were written/published or the chronological order in which the story develops? Do we need to first read Dune (1965) or perhaps go with the Butlerian Jihad (2002) which, after all, takes place 10 thousand years earlier?

My suggestion is to read them exactly in the order in which they were presented above. I think it'd be a sin (really) if your first impression about Dune were from the books of Brian Herbert and not from Frank's.

One could also ponder if all these books are really worth it, all 18 of them. Perhaps some might actually be skipped altogether? I'd say the first twelve of them (from Dune-1965 to The Battle of Corrin-2004) are really a must read. Obviously the first six books (by Frank) are MUCH deeper but if you could make some concessions, Brian's volumes are pretty good themselves. You only need to not expect the same level of depth and lower your requirements. They'll turn out to be pretty enjoyable.

However I believe that beginning from Hunters of Dune, the story takes a somewhat Star Wars-ish turn and deviates from Frank's original spirit (eg. instead of the usual layered plots within plots within plots with increasingly difficult to grasp notions, you're starting to read more and more about space fights and lasers and the like).

All in all, I hope you'll enjoy the Dune Chronicles!(less)
Lucas Well, seeing as I am a 12 year old reading this book I would suggest this book to many people, im not that far into the book but I think that it's a…moreWell, seeing as I am a 12 year old reading this book I would suggest this book to many people, im not that far into the book but I think that it's a great book so far. I would definitely recommend this to my friends.(less)

Community Reviews

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Average rating 4.22  · 
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 ·  649,149 ratings  ·  17,910 reviews


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Manny
There's a characteristically witty essay by Borges about a man who rewrites Don Quixote, many centuries after Cervantes. He publishes a novel with the same title, containing the same words in the same order. But, as Borges shows you, the different cultural context means it's a completely new book! What was once trite and commonplace is now daring and new, and vice versa. It just happens to look like Cervantes's masterpiece.

Similarly, imagine the man who was brave or stupid enough to rewrite Dune
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John Wiswell
Jun 24, 2007 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Science fiction readers, fantasy readers, speculative fiction readers
No one should argue the importance Dune. It laid the foundations for a great deal of the themes and constructs in modern science fiction. Frank Herbert was as important to the genre as Isaac Asimov and Arthur Clarke. Unfortunately, just like them, he's quite dated, and his books can be a labor to read. One thing he maintained from old science fiction was prim and scientific dialogue that no one would ever actually speak. I've known many scientists, and they don't talk like this. You're not going ...more
Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
Nope. Sorry I don't get it.

I was able to finish it by listening to the audiobook but I was bored throughout the whole 21h.

So many descriptions... anyone else found the way Paul's mom describing him kinda weird?

And let's not even mention how many times I laughed at the main female character being called Jessica.

I'm sure I'll get plenty of comments telling me it's a classic and it brought so much to the genre... At the end of the day, my rating is always based on my enjoyment.
Rajat Ubhaykar
In my head, the purpose of this review is very clear. It is to convince YOU to read this book. Yes, you! Waste time no more. Go grab a copy.

Machiavellian intrigue, mythology, religion, politics, imperialism, environmentalism, the nature of power. All this set in a mind-boggling, frighteningly original world which Herbert ominously terms as an "effort at prediction". Dune had me hooked!

First impression

The very first stirring I felt upon opening the yellowed pages of Dune was that of stumbling
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Lyn
Dune.

No other single syllable means as much to the science fiction genre, a single word that conjures images of sandworms, spice wars, great battles between rival dynastic families and a massively detailed and intricately crafted universe. No wonder this is widely regarded as not just a Science Fiction masterpiece, but a literary achievement as well.

Like a study of Shakespeare, the reader finds that this is an archetype upon which many influences and imitators have based their works. The
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Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
LOOK DAMN IT! OMG!













Mel
••••••••••••••••

 :

I was so worried that I wouldn't understand a thing in this book. I will admit there are some things that went over my head but for the most part I figured it out.

I remember a billion and 65 years ago I watched the movie and was like what the? Basically all I remember is Sting and sandworms. I would love to watch it again and see if I understand it more after reading the book.

I'm still not sure what all the spices were about on Arrakis. I keep thinking
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Sean Barrs the Bookdragon
I’m sort of tempted to try this again. I don’t think it’ll be worth the hassle though.

I could never give Dune five stars because I really struggled to get into the novel in the beginning. It has taken me almost two months to read. This, for me, is a very long time to spend on a book. It took me so long to read because I found the writing style incredibly frustrating. I had to read whole chapters again so I could get the gist of the plot. This was more so in the beginning, which I found
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J.G. Keely
People often forget that this series is what innovated our modern concept of science fiction (up until Neuromancer and The Martix, at least). Dune took the Space Opera and asked if it might be more than spandex, dildo-shaped rockets, and scantily-clad green women. Herbert created a vast and complex system of ancient spatial politics and peoples, then set them at one another's throats over land, money, and drugs.

Dune is often said to relate to Sci Fi in the same way that Tolkien relates to
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Bradley
Update 8/28/17

Re-read. Number 13. :) I cry when Paul meets Gurney. I shiver when Jessica consoles Chani. I'm awestruck by the peaks and troughs of time, free-will, and the weakness in Paul even as he heroically strives against the evil that is about to be unleashed upon the universe.

*sigh*

Perfection. Easily the number one book I've ever read. :)

I waver, sometimes, but right now, it is my absolute favorite. :)



Original Review:

This is a phenomenal classic of literature.

It's not just science
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carol.
Oct 03, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: sci-fi fans
I blame the movie.

I was an avid but novice fantasy and sci-fi reader in 1984 when David Lynch’s Dune rolled out as a big-budget adaptation of the 1965 classic book. It was an artistic and box-office failure with Roger Ebert calling it “a real mess, an incomprehensible, ugly, unstructured, pointless excursion.” Numerous references were made to its excessive length, particularly a tv edition that was over 3 hours long. I never did pick up the classic sci-fi book, assuming the commentary heard
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Anne
Jul 28, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Ok, my only reference for Dune was the 1984 movie with Kyle MacLachlan. And, honestly, it was the main reason I've always wanted to read this book.

description
Ohmygod look what that fake-looking piece of plastic shit is doing to poor MacLachlan's nose? How was he even able to act with that thing pushing his nostrils to the side of his face? I can't stop looking at it!

Anyway.
I remember loving that movie when I was young. Ahhhh. I honestly didn't remember much about it other than it was sorta weird, there
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Petrik
Nov 10, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Sci-fi fans
Shelves: owned-ebooks
3.5/5 Stars

Dune oh Dune, seems like I need to raise my Shield Wall for this review.


Dune is one of the most important pieces of literature for the Sci-Fi genre. I’ve been raking my brain for hours on how to properly explain the importance of Dune in the sci-fi literature but you know what? I dune (hehehe) think it’s necessary for me to do so. If you truly wanna know why, you can search it on whatever search engine you use and you'll find hundreds of articles or reviews on why this book is that
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Kemper
Jul 02, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I have to write this review without rhythm so that it won’t attract a worm.

In the distant future Arrakis is a hellhole desert planet where anyone who doesn’t die of thirst will probably be eaten by one of the giant sandworms. It’s also the only place where the precious spice melange can be found so it’s incredibly valuable, and the honorable Duke Leto Atreides has been ordered by the Padishah Emperor to take over control of Arrakis from his mortal enemies, the House Harkonnen. While this seems
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Matt
Jun 02, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Like most of my five star books, I’ve read Dune multiple times. In fact, I’d say that what makes a book more than just enjoyable and instead truly amazing is that you want to read it more than once and are rewarded for doing so. I’ve probably read Dune six times, and I’ve never gotten tired of it but my understanding of the work has increased over time.

To begin with, the first time I read Dune, I got about three pages into it, realized I didn’t understand a thing and that I was hopelessly
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Jay Z
Apr 29, 2014 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sci-fi
If this is the gold standard against which all science fiction must measure and be judged, let's just blow our brains out right now and call it a day.

As far as I can tell, Dune largely inspires two points of view. One marvels at its historical importance and world-building (unique, fascinating, complex, rich), and the other dislikes the stilted writing but does so apologetically because Frank Herbert couldn't help the fact that he wrote science fiction in the 1960s and that Edward Said hadn't
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Michael Finocchiaro
I reread Dune for the first time in several decades and immensely enjoyed it. I also went back to watch the feature film and had quite mixed feelings - while it was close to the overall aesthetic that Frank Herbert describes with the gorgeous desert sets and the terrifying worms, the parts of the story that were necessarily culled out was disturbing (that and the woeful special effects at the time trying (and IMHO failing) to visualize the personal shields that the characters wear in ...more
Matthew Quann
I’ve been sitting at this keyboard for longer than I care to admit trying to coalesce my thoughts about Dune into something coherent. You already know it’s fantastic though, right? Dune is one of those novels that is spoken of in reverential tones by seasoned reader and relative newbie alike. It’s considered by many to be THE best sci-fi novel of all time and Herbert’s son, Brian Herbert, rightfully calls it sci-fi’s equivalent to Lord of the Rings for inspiring all that came after its ...more
Luffy
Jun 02, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This science fiction book was scary. The story set very far into the future has no prudence in it. This is a possible scenario. When I read this book, I was affected by this dark and dismal future.

Sure, the book is sometimes like an adventure. But a lot of it has to do with politics. There is a struggle to control the only planet (Arrakis) which has the spice melange in it. The French noun mélange means mixture. Melange practically makes a superhuman out of a mere man.

I was drawn into the story
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Spencer Orey
Aug 26, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Mostly riveting! In general, I think I loved it?

The worldbuilding is still legendary here, all these years later. I'm going to leave the issues alone (Obviously, there are issues. 1965 was a long time ago).

Mostly, I can see why this book is a beloved classic and why it's been so inspirational. It's a wild ride, interweaving a lot of cool threads, with so much to say about so many dimensions of human life in the possible future. Really cool overall. And the worms are awesome.
Kevin Kelsey
Epic and highly inventive, but not nearly as great as I remember it being. I think Herbert's writing really gets in the way of the story. He continuously tells the reader what each character is thinking through italicized internal dialogue. Sometimes uses the third person narration to do the same thing in a more elegant way. The problem is that he does both, often times for the same character in the same paragraph. It's super clunky, and took me out of the story every time.
Joe Valdez
Mar 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sci-fi-general
I can't explain what attracted me to Dune--the 1965 science fiction epic by Frank Herbert, winner of the first Nebula Award and (in a tie, with This Immortal by Roger Zelazny) the Hugo Award--any better than T.E. Lawrence could explain what attracted him to the Arabian Peninsula. The book's prestige among genre fans was a factor, as were admissions by many that they read it in junior high school and found Herbert accessible. As inclined as I am towards local coffeeshops, perhaps Herbert's head ...more
Alexa
Welcome to Unpopular Review Time! Where I go against what almost everyone else says about a book.

Before we start, please do not be fooled by the three star rating. Even if I didn't like really like the book, I have to acknowledge there are reasons why Dune is a cornerstone of the Sci Fi genre.

Now, let's talk about the important stuff.

This is a masterpiece of world building.

We get a new planet, and while it's obvious that Herbert based his desert planet on real sights and cultures, it's still
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Markus
Buddy re-read with Athena!

“To begin your study of the life of Muad'Dib, then, take care that you first place him in his time: born in the 57th year of the Padishah Emperor, Shaddam IV. And take the most special care that you locate Muad'Dib in his place: the planet Arrakis. Do not be deceived by the fact that he was born on Caladan and lived his first fifteen years there. Arrakis, the planet known as Dune, is forever his place.”

Thus begins one of the greatest novels ever written.

About ten years
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Terry
Is it space opera? Is it political commentary? Is it philosophical exploration? Is it fantasy? _Dune_ is all of these things and possibly more. One thing I do know: it's a kick-ass read!

I've loved this book since I first plunged into it's mightily constructed, weird and obscure world. Of course it's hailed as a classic, and I am one of those that agrees. The sheer magnitude of Herbert's invention, his monumental world-building tied with an exciting story of betrayal, survival, rebellion and
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Richard Derus
Jun 24, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Rating: 4* of five

UPDATE 5/18/2019 The 1984 film is free with Prime on Amazon. With a new version being filmed right now and including some serious firepower from Director Denis Villeneuve to Timothee Chalamet as Muad'dib the Kwisatz Haderach, it seemed like a good moment for a rewatch. It truly is a gorgeous film, but really not so hot on the woke front. Surprise surprise surprise says my brain in its full Gomer Pyle mode.
2/15/17: I found this 2003 mini-documentary about the 1984 film on
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Apatt
Apr 28, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
Does the world need another Dune review? I very much doubt it needs mine but that never stopped me before, saturation be damned!

Dune in and of itself, in isolation from the rest of the numerous other Dune books, is by general consensus the greatest sci-fi novel of all time. You may not agree, and one book can not please everybody but statistically Dune comes closest to achieving just this. Witness how often you see it at or near the top of all-time best sf books lists.

I never read Dune with the
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Trish
Aug 28, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Holy Shai-hulud! It was definitely time for me to finally read this truly great classic of science fiction!

I must say that I've watched the two mini-series, Dune and Children of Dune, in my teenage years. Thus, I already had a grasp of the story, what it was about.
However, nothing could have prepared me for the great writing style, the dense philosophy, ecology, and mythology of this story. It takes the term "world-building" to a whole new level.

So what is this about?
Well, that is not easily
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BAM The Bibliomaniac
I bought the audio!!!! It has various narrators! I'm sooooo excited! This is a desert island read for me. I'm not kidding I was ready to press play to listen again as soon as it finished.

12/26/18 audio reread #266

3/28/19 audio reread I have no idea how many times I’ve read this book. The audio is one of my favorite go-tos. The full cast breathes life into the characters. I’d like to discuss the amazingly original plot, but it’s been years since I read the paper copy and can’t remember the
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Evgeny
Sep 05, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: scifi
This is a classic science fiction book with both movies and miniseries adaptations, so I assume the majority of the people are familiar with the plot which means I will be a little less careful about giving spoilers than usual.

In the distant future the humanity is ruled by an intergalactic feudal Empire - is absolute monarchy the best the humanity could come up with after all its history? Anyway, Duke Leto Atreides accepts control of a desert planet called Arrakis (aka Dune) which also happened
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Manuel Antão
Aug 01, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 1993
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.


Islamic Thought: "Dune" by Frank Herbert


A great book full of grand themes.

Time has only made it grander in its vision. I mean, there was a time when Islam wasn't the great, dangerous "other" to Western eyes. Moderate Islam had an appeal to the west, for example, Goethe's west-eastern Divan. Dune stands in this tradition. It describes a world which is full of Islamic thought. It is world in which Islam probably pushed aside Christianity
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7,136 followers
Frank Herbert was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author.

He is best known for the novel Dune and its five sequels. The Dune saga, set in the distant future and taking place over millennia, dealt with themes such as human survival and evolution, ecology, and the intersection of religion, politics, and power, and is widely considered to be among the
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Other books in the series

Dune (8 books)
  • Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2)
  • Children of Dune (Dune Chronicles, #3)
  • God Emperor of Dune (Dune Chronicles, #4)
  • Heretics of Dune (Dune Chronicles, #5)
  • Chapterhouse: Dune (Dune Chronicles, #6)
  • Hunters of Dune (Dune Chronicles #7)
  • Sandworms of Dune (Dune Chronicles #8)
“I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.” 9406 likes
“Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.” 1121 likes
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