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Retorno a Brideshead

really liked it 4.0  ·  Rating details ·  78,947 Ratings  ·  3,559 Reviews
The most nostalgic and reflective of Evelyn Waugh's novels, Brideshead Revisited looks back to the golden age before the Second World War. It tells the story of Charles Ryder's infatuation with the Marchmains and the rapidly-disappearing world of privilege they inhabit. Enchanted first by Sebastian at Oxford, then by his doomed Catholic family, in particular his remote sis ...more
Paperback, 352 pages
Published 1993 by Tusquets Editores (first published 1945)
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Barbara Definitely appropriate. I first read this book in Contemporary Literature class when I was a senior in high school. And, this was a Catholic high…moreDefinitely appropriate. I first read this book in Contemporary Literature class when I was a senior in high school. And, this was a Catholic high school.(less)
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Paul Bryant
Apr 25, 2008 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
********Please note - contains spoilers ************

One's head is rather spinning, there are so many terribly good things and likewise so very much abject wretchedness it's hard to begin. Let us try.

1) This book is the twisted story of a homosexual affair, which I was truly not expecting it to be. It's famously set amongst the upper classes, firstly in Oxford, so you get pages of blissed-out descriptions of life amongst British aristocratic students in the 1920s and how many plovers eggs they ea
...more
Schmacko
Jun 15, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
I just finished rereading Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited, a book I pick up every couple of years or so. This time I read it because of the new movie version movie (the one with Emma Thompson as the Lady Marchmain Flyte). As a critic, I get to see a pre-screening of the new movie on Tuesday; I am taking Dr. Steve. Also, I am a huge fan of the original, very-literal British miniseries from 1981 (it is the first thing that brought Jeremy Irons to international attention, and it had the excessi ...more
Fabian
Jul 21, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Bright Young Things
Shelves: favorites
"Brideshead Revisited" is almost the opposite of "Vile Bodies"/"Bright Young Things" in that it starts off as a tragedy, or at least pretty damn close to E. M. Forster's "Maurice" territory (thus tres tragique) and ends in such a jubilant & comedic form (sorry for this mega old spoiler). It seems to me that Waugh is a master of Contrasts, & it works all too well... the book ends & the reader is deeply disappointed that it does. I practically ignored most of Seattle as I read a paperb ...more
Diane
Sep 15, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I finished this excellent book weeks ago but I have been stuck on how to review it. I sometimes have problems writing about the books I really like, and I loved this novel. I was familiar with the plot having seen the 2008 movie, but I didn't expect to love the book as much as I did or to get so completely immersed in the story.

I even loved the names of the characters: Charles Ryder. Sebastian Flyte. Julia Flyte. Lady Marchmain. I was caught up in each person — I felt Charles' yearning, I unders
...more
Aubrey
2.5/5

When I first started reading this book, I was puzzled, lost even in my effort to find what exactly the author was attempting. As time and pages passed, I grew horribly angry with it all, and wondered if I would be able to finish and review the story without a note of fury running through it and wrecking what analysis I could present. Now that I've finished, I find myself saddened by the entire experience. With that in mind, let me explain.

This story had a great deal of potential in it, obli
...more
Cecily
Evocative and nostalgic tale, infused with religion and (homo)sexuality, and hence passion, betrayal and guilt.

The later part, about Charles and Celia and then Charles and Julia is more subtle, realistic and sad than the light frivolity of Oxford days.

Hollinghurst's "The Stranger's Child" has many echoes of this (review here: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...).


It's five years since I last read this, but a few ideas that have come back to me by discussing it elsewhere:

SEGREGATION
People we
...more
Glenn Sumi
Just as Charles Ryder is seduced by the aristocratic Marchmain family in Brideshead Revisited, I was seduced by Evelyn Waugh’s gorgeous prose, elegy to lost youth and dreams, and the glamorous between the wars setting.

The pacing is strange, but it’s hinted at in the subtitle: “The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder.” Memories are sporadic, apt to be uncomprehensive, subjective.

Ryder, an officer (“homeless, childless, middle-aged and loveless”), is stationed at the magnificen
...more
Camille Stein
May 09, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
voxsartoria — Knits For The Chill 194. Anthony Andrews and...










If you asked me now who I am, the only answer I could give with any certainty would be my name. For the rest: my loves, my hates, down even to my deepest desires, I can no longer say whether these emotions are my own, or stolen from those I once so desperately wished to be.

...

Perhaps all our loves are merely hints and symbols; vagabond-language scrawled on gate-posts and paving-stones along the weary road that others have tramped before us; perhaps you and I are types and this sadness which so
...more
Lauren G
Sep 25, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
'"Light one for me, would you?"
It was the first time in my life that anyone had asked this of me, and as I took the cigarette from my lips and put it in hers, I caught a thin bat's squeak of sexuality, inaudible to anyone but me.'

This book hit me, hard. I read it for a course in 'Catholic Literature' which was an excuse for my favorite professor to teach a small group of students about his all-time favorite books. He made up the name so he could teach it as a theology/literature course.

We read
...more
Jason
Jul 09, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: the well-read and those who claim to be
Shelves: favorites
An English novel dating from near the end of World War II, Brideshead Revisited is an elaborate and fascinating reminiscence of a time passed. A novel told in reverie by eyes looking back.

At the core of the novel is the friendship between Oxford classmates Charles (the narrator) and Sebastian. One thing separates Charles and Sebastian. Class. A ubiquitous theme in the best English novels, portrayed here as well as it is in any counterpart in English fiction. One thing unites them. Affection. Per
...more
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Goodreads Librari...: What publisher to choose? Book club plus regular publisher 10 33 Jan 08, 2018 03:32PM  
Bright Young Things: April 2012 - Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh 80 124 Jul 30, 2017 06:21AM  
What Would Sebastian's Favourite Books Be? 5 17 May 03, 2017 05:38PM  
British Literatur...: Book Review: Brideshead Revisited 1 8 Mar 13, 2017 02:31AM  
Book Review 1 7 Mar 12, 2017 04:50PM  
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Evelyn Waugh's father Arthur was a noted editor and publisher. His only sibling Alec also became a writer of note. In fact, his book “The Loom of Youth” (1917) a novel about his old boarding school Sherborne caused Evelyn to be expelled from there and placed at Lancing College. He said of his time there, “…the whole of English education when I was brought up was to produce prose writers; it was al ...more
More about Evelyn Waugh...
“Sometimes, I feel the past and the future pressing so hard on either side that there's no room for the present at all.” 2849 likes
“It doesn't matter what people call you unless they call you pigeon pie and eat you up.” 1214 likes
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