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Tales of Impossibility: The 2000-Year Quest to Solve the Mathematical Problems of Antiquity

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4.27  ·  Rating details ·  22 ratings  ·  6 reviews
A comprehensive look at four of the most famous problems in mathematics



Tales of Impossibility recounts the intriguing story of the renowned problems of antiquity, four of the most famous and studied questions in the history of mathematics. First posed by the ancient Greeks, these compass and straightedge problems--squaring the circle, trisecting an angle, doubling the cube
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Hardcover, 456 pages
Published October 8th 2019 by Princeton University Press
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Hakan Can Gunerli
Feb 18, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: formal-sciences
I'm not big brain enough to understand this
Fernando Pestana da Costa
Jun 11, 2020 rated it it was amazing
This is a really excellent book. Its starting point are the classical geometrical problems of Antiquity: the squaring of the circle, the trisection of a general angle, the doubling of the cube, and the construction of a general n-gon (a polygon with sides) using only a compass and an unmarked straight edge. The problems are stated with precision (and the reader is alerted to the crucial importance to state problems with precision!), and then the wonderful history of the effort of countless perso ...more
Dave
Oct 16, 2020 rated it liked it
Decent book, but it did not captivate me like Euler's Gem.
Steve Gross
Apr 12, 2020 rated it really liked it
More than you ever wanted to know about the three/four classic problems of antiquity. Touches on many other areas of mathematics.
Yossi Khebzou
Jul 16, 2020 rated it really liked it
I enjoyed this book because I think the most beautiful and exceptional area of Mathematics is proofs. However, I’m personally not very emotionally fond of Euclidean Geometry, which takes a good part of the book. Anyhow, it’s still a great read about the development of impossible problems, the history of Mathematics and the advancements that were made trying to solve these problems.
A   J
Jan 28, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: good-stuffs
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David Richeson is a professor of mathematics at Dickinson College and the editor of Math Horizons, the undergraduate magazine of the Mathematical Association of America. He received his undergraduate degree from Hamilton College and his masters and PhD from Northwestern University. He lives with his wife and two children in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

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