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Dance Of The Infidels: A Portrait Of Bud Powell
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Dance Of The Infidels: A Portrait Of Bud Powell

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4.41  ·  Rating details ·  74 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
What Charlie Parker was to the saxophone, Bud Powell (1924–1966) was to the piano: No jazz pianist can rival his brilliance. But his life was filled with tragedy, including years of electroshock therapy in psychiatric institutions, illnesses, physical and mental abuse from people who fed him dangerous drugs to control him, and the indifference of his contemporaries to his ...more
Paperback, 368 pages
Published March 22nd 1998 by Da Capo Press (first published March 21st 1998)
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David
Jan 02, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Dance of the Infidels is one of the most enlightening books I have read in a long time. After seeing the wonderful film Round Midnight, I couldn't wait to read this book, as the film is based upon Paudras' work.

The book more than exceeded my expectations. Francis Paudras manages to successfully recreate the Paris of the late 50s, the smoky air of the Blue Note club, and the intriguing idiosyncrasies of the many jazz musicians he meets. He also paints a beautiful picture of Bud Powell, and throug
...more
C. Michael
Apr 11, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Dance of the Infidels: A Portrait of Bud Powell
Francis Paudras
355 Pages
ISBN: # 0-306-80816-1
Da Capo Press
1998


Pianist Earl Randolph "Bud" Powell (1924-1966) is one of jazz's brightest stars and most tragic figures. The new millennium has enjoyed a renewed interest in Powell, his life and art with Alan Groves and Alyn Shipton's Glass Enclosure: The Life of Bud Powell (Bloomsbury Academic, 2001), Peter Pullman's Wail: The Life of Bud Powell (Peter Pullman, LLC, 2001) and Gruthrie Ramsey's The
...more
Shenanitims
May 19, 2013 rated it liked it
I think this book could seriously use a better introduction. Going in, I had no idea who Francis Paudras was, so his devoting entire chapters to his own growing up listening to Bud Powell seemed kind of weird. Had I known he'd later be one of Powell's good friends, and help Powell's (short-lived) recovery, I might've been more accepting.

Though, as it stands, it is still an unusual portrait. "Portrait" being the imperative word as the story is mainly Bud Powell as seen through Paudras' eyes. So y
...more
Laurie
Dec 30, 2010 rated it it was amazing
This is the best book on a jazz musician that I know. I admit I am a jazz music geek. and all of the greats are my family. But this book combines the stress of mental illness (Powell's, on Powell) and the stress of African American relationship woes. His marriage to his wife was absurdly loveless and her abuse was palpable. The author, Paudras, is a fan who takes him to Paris, lifts him out of his abusive relationship with American society and his wife, and who saves him in as many ways as a per ...more
Paul Secor
I bought the original French edition of this book, published by L'Instant, back in 1987 or so. There are hundreds of wonderful photos in that book but, unfortunately for me, the text is in French, and I can only read French very very haltingly. When Da Capo published an English translation, it was a godsend. The Da Capo edition omits most of the photographs, but I already have those. With the two editions combined, I have it all.
Soledad
Oct 23, 2016 rated it it was amazing
It's a moving book because Powell's life was so dramatic and Paudras was incredibly generous to support him as a brother. You feel so happy when the jazzist is being welcomed and accompanied by Francis and his friends. Two men who knew tragedy but will always be remembered by the magnificence of their souls.
Ingo
Apr 30, 2012 rated it really liked it
Quite an entertaining and easily readable journey through time in philosophy and sociology. Maybe Precht is trying a bit too hard to impose his own personal views on certain ethical issues on the reader. You can agree with these or not, but maybe that is precisely what makes the book so digestible.
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