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The First Dinosaur: How Science Solved the Greatest Mystery on Earth

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4.25  ·  Rating details ·  20 ratings  ·  8 reviews
A Kirkus Reviews Best Middle Grade Book of 2019
An Orbis Picture Recommended Title

“An outstanding case study in how science is actually done: funny, nuanced, and perceptive.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Join early scientists as they piece together one of humanity’s greatest puzzles—the fossilized bones of the first dinosaur!

Dinosaurs existed. That’s a fact we
...more
Hardcover, 224 pages
Published October 8th 2019 by Margaret K. McElderry Books
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Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)
There is a certain wow factor when you open up this book and flip through the pages. Older students who love dinosaurs will find this book fascinating.
Anne
Jan 17, 2020 rated it it was amazing
The First Dinosaur is a surprisingly excellent book. I say surprisingly because I had no idea what I didn't know about the discovery of dinosaurs. It brought to mind the old saying, "the student doesn't know enough to ask a question." As I read The First Dinosaur I realized that people had been seeing bone fragments and other fossils for thousands of years and had no idea what they were looking at and had no way to check further. Until the 1600s through the Scientific Age when men, usually ...more
Beth
Dec 05, 2019 rated it really liked it
A history of fossils and the discovery, identification and naming of megalosaurus, with an emphasis on how the science worked, including the invention of science. I really like the description of the growth of the scientific method, and the emphasis on the challenge of knowing what questions to ask, especially when an entire topic is unknown. The text is engaging with great illustrations, taking time to show each historical figure as an individual.
Mae Respicio
Oct 19, 2019 rated it it was amazing
An inspiring STEM-based book rich with fascinating details, fun anecdotes, and surprising facts—with gorgeous illustrations and cool archival photos to match. (Bonus: Decapitated shark!) I loved this book and the often humorous tone made it easy to read with my son. I’d recommend it for any kind of reader.
Terry Nolan
Nov 10, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Thoroughly enjoyable read! Although this book is aimed at older kids I would recommend this for any parents with inquisitive younger kids (or if you fancy a good time rollicking through the story of the discovery of the first dinosaur). Great illustrations and a knack of keeping the story ticking along with amusing / interesting / plain weird titbits make this a very entertaining read.
Biggertony
Oct 21, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Not only did my kids adore this book, but I loved it just as much! It never even occurred to me that the very notion of "dinosaurs" had to be pieced together from countless tiny clues. Seriously, this is one of the coolest historical mysteries I've ever encountered, and one that I've never seen anywhere else. An incredible must-read for any curious human!
Mary Norell Hedenstrom
Oct 26, 2019 rated it really liked it
The beginning of scientists, geology, paleontology, and determining the age of earth.
PWRL
Jan 22, 2020 marked it as to-read
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Ian Lendler is, first and foremost, a person. After that, the details get a bit sketchy. We’re pretty sure he has two arms and two legs. There are rumors of a third thumb, which you may laugh about now but let’s see what you think 1,000 years from now when evolution decides that three thumbs is way better because you can use can-openers more efficiently and hitchhike with aplomb and everyone will ...more
“Rocks are the ticking clock that measure the age of the Earth.” 0 likes
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